Ohio University

South Green Hall Namesakes

Adams Hall : Brown Hall : Carr Hall : Crawford Hall : Dougan House : Ewing House : Hoover House

Luchs Hall : Mackinnon Hall : Pickering Hall : Sowle Hall : Tanaka Hall : True Hall : Wray House


Adams Hall

Adams Hall Namesake

Est. 2007

Alvin C. Adams was the first African-American graduate of Ohio University’s School of Journalism, graduating in 1959. He went on to a career working for the nation’s first black daily newspaper, the Chicago Daily Defender, and covered Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech and the assassination of Malcolm X for JET magazine. An Athens County native, Adams and his wife, Ada, co-founded the Multicultural Genealogical Center in Chesterhill, Ohio.

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Brown Hall

Brown Hall Namesake

Est. 1966

Archibald G. Brown was one of Athens County's earliest settlers and an Ohio University graduate from the class of 1822. Brown established the first newspaper in Athens County, the Athens Mirror and Literary Register, and was a charter member of the Athenian Literary Society. Brown practiced law in the county and served as a member of a state constitutional convention. In 1859, he organized the Ohio University's Alumni Association. As evidenced by his 50-year membership on the board of trustees, Brown was highly dedicated to Ohio University.

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Carr Hall

Carr Hall Namesake

Est. 2015

Local to the city of Athens, Arthur Carr was a 1905 graduate of Ohio University. As one of 17 members of the 1903 Ohio University football team, Carr is believed to be Ohio University's first African-American student-athlete. Upon his graduation, Carr attended Howard University Medical School, graduated in 1912 and later taught at Howard Medical School for 45 years.

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Crawford Hall

Crawford Hall Namesake

Est. 1967

Andrew J. Crawford was a family physician and practiced medicine in Glouster, Ohio, located to the north of Athens. As a member of the Ohio Legislature, Crawford introduced legislation for Workman's Compensation and for the eight-hour workday for state employees. Crawford was instrumental in obtaining funds for Ohio University's Ellis Hall, the former Boyd Hall and the Women's Gymnasium.

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Dougan House

Dougan House

Est. 1970

Stanley Dougan was a well-known physician, surgeon and 1914 graduate of Ohio University. A charter member of the Ohio University Athletic Hall of Fame, Dougan played professional baseball before beginning his career in medicine. He was a lifelong member of the Ohio University Alumni Association.

Dougan House was originally known as South Green building number twelve.

 

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Ewing House

Ewing Hall Namesake

Est. 1969

Thomas Ewing was a member of Ohio University’s first graduating class of 1815. He devoted his life to public service through his work as a U.S. Senator, Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, and the first Secretary of the Interior. Ewing also served on the Ohio University board of trustees from 1824 to 1832.

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Hoover House

Hoover House Namesake

Est. 1969

In 1908, Thomas N. Hoover began his 39-year career as an Ohio University professor of history. Hoover was a well-known historian, authoring the book, “The History of Ohio University”. A native of Jackson, Ohio, Hoover was educated at Ohio University and Harvard University. He was a contributor to the American Yearbook and Cyclopedia of American Government.

Hoover House was originally known as South Green building number fifteen.

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Luchs Hall

Luchs Hall Namesake

Est. 2015

Evelyn Coulter Luchs became the first woman trustee of Ohio University in 1949. Luchs was a graduate of Ohio University and was voted the most outstanding student in 1927. Luchs received a Certificate of Merit Award from Ohio University for national contributions to education and religion and was well known for her interest and participation in civic and welfare activities. Luchs was the president of the Ohio Council of Church Women and was actively involved in the National Council of Protestant and Presbyterian Church Women. She served on President Nixon's Committee on Government Contracts and on the board of trustees of the International University of Tokyo.

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Mackinnon Hall

Mackinnon Hall Namesake

Est. 1967

Beginning in the early 1900s, Clinton N. Mackinnon served as a professor of English at Ohio University, holding that position for 37 years. During his career at the University, Mackinnon founded Torch and Cresset, honors fraternities for men and women, respectively.

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Pickering Hall

Pickering Hall Namesake

Est. 1965

Thomas Pickering was a Revolutionary War soldier and a founder of the Newburgh Plan to the Continental Congress in 1783. Many of the ideas in the plan were later incorporated in the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, including the provision for schools and education in the Ohio Territory.

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Sowle Hall

Sowle Hall Namesake

Est. 2015

Claude R. Sowle served as president of Ohio University from 1969 to 1974. Sowle led the University during a tumultuous time, including the closing of the University because of the riots in 1970 after the Kent State shootings. President Sowle was known for his transparency in office, often broadcasting open budget hearings live over the campus radio stations. The office of the ombuds, the office of institutional equity, and the Honors Tutorial College as we know them today were established during President Sowle's term.

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Tanaka Hall

Tanaka Hall Namesake

Est. 2015

Tanaka Hall was named for Tomoyasu and Sumiko Tanaka. Tomoyasu was a member of the Ohio University physics and astronomy faculty from 1971 to 1989, was appointed as an emeritus faculty member, and was widely considered the father of the OHIO-Chubu relationship. He mentored Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, who earned his Ph.D. from Ohio University in 1976 and received the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Sumiko Susuki co-founded the Exchange Program for Developmentally Disabled and Elderly Citizens, while also frequently opening her home to exchange students.

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True House

True House Namesake

Est. 1970

In 1798, Josiah True moved to the Ohio River Valley and became a well-known leader in the startup community of Athens, Ohio. During his long career of public service in the upstart settlement, True served as township trustee, postmaster, justice of the peace and overseer of the poor. True is credited as the mastermind of a plan to establish the Coonskin Library, also known as the Western Library Association, in Amesville, Ohio, in 1804.

True House was originally known as South Green building number eleven.

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Wray House

Wray House Namesake

Est. 1968

Edith A. Wray was an Ohio University professor of English for 36 years (1926-1962), serving as department chair for seven years. Wray was very active in several campus groups including the Y.W.C.A., Mortar Board, and the American Association of University Women, serving as president for the Ohio division in 1950. Additionally, Wray was a charter member of the Phi Beta Kappa Honors Society, Ohio University chapter.

Wray House was originally known as South Green building number thirteen. The hall is easily found on South Green as it is topped with the iconic clock tower and bobcat weathervane.

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