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Molecular and Cellular Biology

Ohio University offers interdisciplinary graduate study in molecular and cell biology through the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Molecular and Cellular Biology. The Departments of Biological Sciences, Biomedical Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Environmental and Plant Biology contribute dynamic faculty and access to world-class research facilities to provide students with the broadest scientific educational opportunities.

 

The program offers the Ph.D. in a broad range of areas in molecular and cellular biology catered to student and faculty interests. M.S. degrees with a concentration in molecular and cellular biology are available in the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Environmental and Plant Biology. MCB graduate students are eligible to earn a graduate certificate in Bioinformatics during their study at Ohio University. A core curriculum has been developed with course offerings in MCB, Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Plant Biology, and Computer Science.


MCB Faculty and Students in the News

Ohio University, Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador expanding their partnership to benefit students, faculty
Leaders from Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador and Ohio University recently signed an agreement providing opportunities for students and faculty from both institutions to expand collaborations focused on global health education and research.
 
New Kopchick awards support OHIO scientific and medical research
Ten Ohio University students and one faculty member have received funding from three new research awards programs supported by a gift from John and Char Kopchick and contributions from five academic colleges and administrative units.
 
Graduate College announces 2014-15 Named Fellows
Graduate College announces 2014-15 Named Fellows
 
How DNA barcoding can boost quality control for medical plant products
In Pakistan, about 70 percent of people use herbal medicines because they don’t have the money for or access to pharmaceutical drugs. More than 350 companies produce inexpensive, effective natural treatments for these consumers, and there are 60,000 registered traditional healers who prescribe such medicines.

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Sep 2, 2015 5:00 PM
Baker Center Front Room

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