Skip to: Main Content Search Navigation Secondary Navigation
Make It Known

Ohio University alumnus Clarence Page wins Kiplinger Award for Distinguished Contributions to Journalism

Feb 16, 2018

(Center) Clarence Page, BSJ ’69, HON ’93, was awarded the prestigious W.M. Kiplinger Award for Distinguished Contributions to Journalism on Feb. 15. / Photo provided by Bob Stewart

Ohio University alumnus Clarence Page wins Kiplinger Award for Distinguished Contributions to Journalism

ATHENS, Ohio (Feb. 16, 2018)—Syndicated columnist Clarence Page, BSJ ’69, HON ’93, was awarded the prestigious W.M. Kiplinger Award for Distinguished Contributions to Journalism at the National Press Foundation's annual journalism awards dinner on Feb. 15, in Washington, DC.

“Clarence is a great role model for journalists who want to confront society’s ills while maintaining civility in how they express themselves,” said E.W. Scripps School of Journalism Director Robert Stewart.

Page was named Ohio University’s Alumnus of the Year in 2015. He was also inducted into the Ohio Communication Hall of Fame in 2014, bestowed an honorary doctorate degree from Ohio University in 1993 and awarded the L.J. Hortin Distinguished Alumnus from the Ohio University E.W. Scripps School of Journalism in 1991. Earlier this week, the University congratulated Page throughout the city with more than 30 street-level digital posters.

The Kiplinger Award was presented by Knight Kiplinger, editor-in-chief of The Kiplinger Letter, a business forecasting publication founded in 1923. Past winners include NPR’s Diane Rehm (2015), Sports Illustrated’s Frank Deford (2012) and New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman (2007).

In awarding the Kiplinger honor to Page, the judges said his “columns tackle the thorniest issues of the day—from immigration to discrimination—with good humor and humility.”

"Clarence Page's impact on the world of journalism is undeniable and a shining example of what it means to be an Ohio University Bobcat," said Ohio University President M. Duane Nellis. “His global commentary, as a reporter, an editor, syndicated columnist and author, continues to provide unique insight into important global discussions involving culture, race, society and economics."

Deep Ohio Roots

Page, 70, noted his lifelong admiration for the Kiplinger reputation for integrity and independence, starting when Page was an editor of his high school newspaper in Middletown in the 1960s.

Born in Dayton and raised in Middletown, Page’s award-winning journalism career began at age 17 as a freelance reporter and photographer for newspapers in Middletown and Cincinnati. Page earned a journalism degree in 1969 from Ohio University, where he worked at the student newspaper, The Post.

Page joined the Chicago Tribune in 1984; his column is syndicated by Tribune Media Services. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 1989.

“For 50 years, Mr. Page has been a consistent and authentic voice for our nation,” Congressman Steve Stivers (R-OH) said in a tribute published February 5 in the Congressional Record, “and has earned the respect of his peers and his audiences as a reporter, editor, syndicated columnist and commentator.”

Stivers’ district includes Ohio University, home of the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism.

Legacy of Excellence

Ohio University has produced 38 Pulitzer Prize winners, including Page, according to Bob Stewart, director of the journalism school. Recent winners include:

  • Investigative reporter Alex Stuckey, who graduated from Ohio University in 2012, was part of a team that won a 2017 Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of sexual assault at Brigham Young University and Utah State University.
  • Wesley Lowery, editor of Ohio University’s student newspaper in 2011-2012, was on The Washington Post team that won the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting on police “Fatal Force.” His New York Times bestseller book “They Can't Kill Us All" was awarded the 2017 Christopher Isherwood prize for autobiographical prose by the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes. 


In 1982, the top-rated journalism school at Ohio University was named in honor of E.W. Scripps, a penny press pioneer. In 2006, the Scripps Howard Foundation, the Cincinnati-based philanthropic arm of The E.W. Scripps Company, made a $15-million gift to the college, and the college was renamed the Scripps College of Communication.

Page was Ohio University’s commencement speaker in 1993 and 2001.