Ohio University

Reach for the Stars

Learning to use a 1.3 meter diameter telescope, observing stars throughout the night, and designing a research activity are just a few of the experiences students have while on a field trip to the top of a mountain in the Sonoran desert.
Learning to use a 1.3 meter diameter telescope, observing stars throughout the night, and designing a research activity are just a few of the experiences students have while on a field trip to the top of a mountain in the Sonoran desert.

High-Impact Experiences

Miguel Gomez '16 B.S. Physics & Computer Science learned the value of learning the basics of data reduction and analysis in order to study to stars and supernovae. 

Michael Jaramillo '17 B.S. Astrophysics gained experience working with software to verify proper cataloging of star cluster images and the data associated with the images. 

Gabriel Reineck '17 B.S. Astrophysics learned a lot about cosmology and some software programs. He plotted cosmological constant versus other models to see what value dark matter density or baryonic matter density should be for a flat universe.

Jacob Williamson '17 B.S. Astrophysics & Mathematics learned programming language and studied how to classify supernovae based on light curves and spectral data.

During the summer 2014, Ryan Goetz '17 Astrophysics, learned to write computer code to estimate the mass of galaxies and galaxy clusters. "It allowed me to do something that may help advance our scientific knowledge."

Keith Hawkins '13 HTC became interested in the stars looking at National Geographic in school. Now he's following in the footsteps of theoretical physicists Isaac Newton and Stephen Hawking as a graduate student at Cambridge University.