For more information:

Department of Social and Public Health

W324 Grover Center
Athens, OH 45701

Dr. Doug Bolon
Interim Chair  
740.593.4675
chspss@ohio.edu 
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Undergraduate Admissions

120 Chubb Hall
1 Ohio University
Athens, OH 45710

740.593.4100
View Site  

Child and Family Studies  

The program prepares you to work with children, adults, and families throughout the lifespan in a broad range of settings. The developmental orientation of the program is designed to provide a thorough understanding of every major developmental period in life in multiple contexts from birth to adolescence, to working with mid-life and older adults. It includes child, adult, and family development classes in the Department of Social and Public Health, with a life span emphasis, as well as courses that include diversity in families, family ties and aging, human sexualities, the impact of stress and trauma, and death and dying. Professional skill development is an essential part of the program and intended to give students the practical skill set needed by human services specialists. Required courses from other departments or programs include early childhood education, health, psychology, sociology, and social work. Also required are a 75 hour practicum and a 600 hour full-time internship. These provide practical experience and the opportunity to integrate theory and course content into real-life situations. The program also is designed to provide a strong foundation for those students who plan to go on to graduate school. The child and family studies program offers three different concentrations to choose from: child, adult, and family services; child life; and family gerontology.

Child, Adult, and Family Services Concentration

This concentration prepares students to work with individuals and families in diverse settings, including human and social service agencies, and programs for children, adolescents, as well as young, mid-life, and older adults. Students learn about the nature of individual and family interactions, family dynamics, how individuals within the family contribute to and are shaped by these dynamics, and how broad societal contexts (e.g., schools, peers, gender, poverty) influence individual development and family functioning. By studying varied developmental pathways, including those pathways characterized by stress and trauma, students will have the opportunity to acquire the professional skills necessary to work with individuals, couples and families in a broad range of human service settings.

Child Life Concentration

This concentration prepares students for a career as a Certified Child Life Specialist (CCLS), as designated by the Child Life Council, the governing organization that oversees this profession. The CCLS helps normalize the hospitalization experience for children and families, and provides specific services that include preparations for medical procedures, coping skills for children during stressful health care experiences, support for siblings and parents, therapeutic medical play, planning an implementing activities to enhance growth and development, and interdisciplinary team involvement. In addition to core cores in the child and family studies program, students in this concentration are required to take courses in biology, psychology, early childhood education, and health.

Family Gerontology Concentration

This concentration focuses on aging within the context of families, more specifically the implications, support needs, and outcomes for adults and their family members as they age and the quality of their relationships across the life course. Child and family studies students who chose this concentration also will receive an undergraduate gerontology certificate to help them better prepare for careers advocating for and helping older adults and their family members. With this concentration, students typically seek employment working with mid to later life adults and their family members or pursue graduate work in such areas a marriage and family therapy, social work, human development and family studies, rehabilitation services, and public/community health.

Career Opportunities

With an accumulation of over 700 hours of service-learning, practicum, and internship experiences (includes 600 hour final internship, 75 hour practicum, and required service-learning hours built into selected courses), students who graduate from this program will have ample opportunities to explore career options, gain valuable experience, and develop/refine marketable skills. Child and family studies graduates find employment in many areas of human services, including child and family services, adolescent groups homes, rehabilitation centers, community programs for the developmentally disabled, senior citizen centers and facilities, family planning centers, mental health agencies, probation services, emergency shelters, adult foster care, hospice, hospitals, 4-H programs, and other agencies that assist families and individuals in crisis. The child and family studies program offers three different concentrations to choose from: child, adult, and family services; child life: and family gerontology. All three concentrations are designed to provide a strong foundation for those students who plan to go on to graduate school.

 

Our Faculty

To view our entire faculty, please click here.

 


College of Health Sciences and Professions

The youngest of Ohio University's academic units, the College of Health Sciences and Professions is home to about 100 staff and faculty members and 2,500 students. The College was launched in 1979 under the name Health and Human Services, and was renamed in 2010 during an academic realignment that migrated several of its programs to other campus units.

The College began with three schools in 1979 and had grown to include six by the time it was restructured in 2010. Today it includes four academic units: the School of Nursing; School of Applied Health Sciences and Wellness; School of Rehabilitation and Communication Sciences; and Department of Social and Public Health.

All four are housed in Grover Center, a state-of-the-art facility that underwent an extensive renovation, completed in 2001, that for the first time brought all of the College’s academic programs under one roof.

While the four academic units form its core, the College over the years has branched into outreach initiatives that serve the surrounding community while providing valuable practical experience for students. These include WellWorks nutrition and fitness center; Ohio University Therapy Associates’ Hearing, Speech, Language and Physical Therapy clinics; Atrium Café; and Kids on Campus afterschool and summer programs.


Ohio University

Established in 1804, Ohio University is the oldest public institution of higher learning in the state of Ohio and the first in the Northwest Territory. Admission to Ohio University is granted to the best-qualified applicants as determined by a selective admission policy.