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Scripps interns offer tips on getting experience, internships

Published: August 26, 2022 Author: Rory Ball

The scramble for internships can be intimidating.

Four Scripps College of Communication students and recent graduates shared advice for internship-hungry students on how to approach interviews and gain experience that will enhance skills and resumes.

Kyle Henn

Kyle Henn, a 2022 alumnus of the School of Media Arts and Studies, is a video producer at Spectrum News 1 in Raleigh, N.C. Being a sports fan, during Henn’s first year at OHIO he became a fan of ESPN3, an on-campus class led by Ohio University Athletics in partnership with the Scripps College and WOUB that produces 35-40 live sporting events each year to contribute to ESPN Digital. Henn worked in several positions at ESPN3, using his work to build a reel that showcased his breadth of experience.

In fall of 2021, Henn participated in the OHIO-in-L.A. program, completing two internships there. For his internship at True Blue Creatives, Henn assisted with producing short features on NFL players. Henn said his reel served him well during his job hunt, making an impression on his current supervisor who hired him at Spectrum. Henn’s advice:

  • Make use of your connections in the industry. Someone always knows someone who is looking to hire. In most cases, people are usually willing to help people trying to break into the industry. 
  • Don’t be afraid to broaden your areas of interest and apply for internships that could be out of your comfort zone.
Kyle Henn
Kyle Henn

Kate Marijolovic

Senior journalism major Kate Marijolovic recently completed a summer internship at the Star-News, a Gannett publication in Wilmington, N.C. Marijolovic thought it was essential that she maintain contacts at Gannett to land the internship, however while interviewing she realized that her work — including her experience writing for The New Political — would help her secure an internship.

Marijolovic said she landed the internship because of her interest in local news and telling well-rounded stories. Her OHIO classes, as well as the Scripps-in-DC program, prepared her for the internship she completed in August. Marijolovic's advice:

  • Be persistent. Getting an internship takes time, and you might not get a response back from many. Remember that eventually, someone will reach out.
  • Don’t be afraid to apply for positions at publications where you don’t already have connections.
  • Be open to moving somewhere you’ve never been before. Applying to internships across the country broadens your job search, and it can be a great opportunity to explore a new place.
Kate Marijolovic
Kate Marijolovic

Matt Geiger

Matt Geiger graduated last spring from the College of Arts and Sciences with majors in economics and political science. He spent the summer interning as a business reporter for BusinessDen in Denver, Colo., through the Dow Jones News Fund. At OHIO Geiger gained journalism experience at The Post, starting his freshman year and moving up to digital managing editor his senior year.

Before going to Denver, Geiger completed internships with congressional staff in Washington, D.C., and with the Business Journals, where he wrote for bureaus in New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago and Cleveland. He plans to return to OHIO to pursue a master’s degree in economics. Geiger’s advice:

  • Internships snowball. Once you get one, it’s easier to get another, and so on. I try and add every source I talk to on LinkedIn, because you just never know when they may have a job opening in the future.
  • Search on the hidden job market. Applying to a job or internship conventionally puts you at a disadvantage since you have no one to vouch for you. It’s okay to use the network you’ve built to find a job, and that includes sending messages to people just simply asking if they have a spot open. If you don’t ask, you don’t get. 
  • For those starting an internship: imposter syndrome is natural. I get it all the time. The best antidote is to simply ask for feedback from your supervisor. This shows proactivity and that you genuinely care about the role you’re working in.
Matt Geiger
Matt Geiger

Bre Offenberger

Bre Offenberger, who graduated this spring with a degree in journalism, received an early start as a student journalist at OHIO by attending the E.W. Scripps High School Journalism Workshop. In her first year at OHIO, Offenberger contributed to The Post in a multitude of ways, working her way to managing editor by the end of her junior year. Through the Dow Jones News Fund program, Offenberger spent the summer interning at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia after a week of intense training from Dow Jones. After arriving in Richmond, Offenberger quickly received a job offer at the Times-Dispatch as a copyeditor. Offenberger’s advice:

  • Apply to a lot of places, but don’t apply to a place where you don’t want to work.
  • It’s not good to depend on one or two places you deeply want, especially when it comes to finding your first internship, because your chances are slim. But if you randomly apply to a bunch of places and end up getting an internship you don't care about, you'll have a miserable 10 weeks. Once you secure a couple internships and fill up your resume, then you can pull back a little and focus on those few you really want.
  • Talk to your coworkers, even if they seem intimidating. I fell in love with Richmond so quickly because everyone I work with is incredibly kind. Once I was hired full-time, I was ecstatic to be able to be around these people longer. Jobs can be miserable if you don't have anyone to talk to. Be yourself and reach out. I'm sure they'd love to talk.
Bre Offenberger
Bre Offenberger