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Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014

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The Open Door

“The Open Door” by Marlene L'Abbe

Photo courtesy of: Women of Appalachia

Sisters-in-Recovery-Clothesline

“’Sisters in Recovery’ from the Clothesline Project” by Kari Gunter-Seymour

Photo courtesy of: Women of Appalachia

Featured Stories


Women of Appalachia Project presents the 3rd annual art exhibition and "Women Speak"

A celebration of southeast Ohio's visual, literary and performing women artists


The Women of Appalachia Project is pleased to announce the schedule for the  3rd Annual Women of Appalachia (WOA) art exhibit and "Women Speak" events, hosted by the Ohio University Multicultural Center and Women’s Center.

The art exhibit opens its doors to the community on April 4 – June 14, in the Multicultural Art Gallery, second floor of the Baker University Center, on the Athens campus. Events begin with an opening reception on Friday, April 8, from 6 – 9 p.m., with a special presentation of performance and spoken art at 6:45 p.m.

The sister event, “Women Speak,” an evening of story, dance, poetry and song, will be presented in the Baker Center Theater on May 12, from 6 – 9 p.m.  All activities and events are free and open to the public.

“The WOA events showcase the way in which female artists respond to this region as a source of inspiration with the intention that this gathering of artwork and spoken word will prove to be greater than the sum of its parts as visual and verbal themes begin to emerge through the intertwining of the artwork and language,” said Kari Gunter-Seymour, the event’s founder and curator and a communication designer at the College of Osteopathic Medicine. “As a result, this confluence of ideas and inspirations becomes an empowering experience for artists and community alike.”

Gunter-Seymour pointed out that many people have an image of an Appalachian woman, and they look down on her. The Women of Appalachia Project encourages participation from women of diverse backgrounds, ages and experiences to come together, to embrace the stereotype, to show the whole woman; beyond the superficial factors that people use to judge her.

This year's event will highlight the work of 33 artists, ranging from painters, ceramicists, jewelers, photographers and fiber arts, to musicians, storytellers, dancers and poets. Artists hail from Athens, Meigs, Morgan, Vinton, Hocking and Jackson counties.

Sharing the spotlight is the work of regional women from the Sisters in Recovery Collective entitled “The Clothesline Project,” a spin-off of the national effort to inform the public and assist with the healing process for victims of domestic violence and rape
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 “Women heal and grow through connections with other women. There is something instinctive happening, like when our foremothers went to the well to gather water – a natural connection is made,” said Evelyn Nagy, director of the rural women’s recovery program.



A reception will follow both events, giving attendees an opportunity to meet and speak with the artists directly about their work.

For more information go to www.womenofappalachiaevents.com*.

Related Links

Women of Appalachia* Voices and visions from Appalachia

Additional Info

*Following this link takes you away from the Ohio University website.