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YouTube mini-movies promote study of physics and astronomy

Collaborative effort could attract students to field 


The Physics and Astronomy Department has launched a new mini movies series on YouTube called "Why Physics?" 

The series comprises eight 60-second movies that serve as a promotional tool to highlight the benefits of studying in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at OHIO. The movies can be viewed by clicking here.

These mini-movies highlight how infinite and exciting the fields of physics and astronomy are to study. The series features snap shot interviews of students in the department describing why they study physics and astronomy and what they like about OHIO.
 
The "Why Physics?" series is the result of a three-month collaboration between members of two academic units, the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Scripps College of Communication School of Media Arts and Studies. 

In early fall, Physics and Astronomy Special Projects Filmmaker Jean Andrews approached MDIA Associate Professor Frederick Lewis about the two departments collaborating on a new YouTube movie production. The idea was to have Lewis' video production senior undergraduate students provide the expertise and equipment to help Andrews make a few promotional spots about the Physics and
Astronomy.

Lewis suggested a funding amount and requested it be deposited into his students' video production fund, which would directly benefit his students working on a major feature about cancer called,
"The Passageway." These funds will go toward our MDIA 419 project this year, a full-length feature about a family coping with cancer," Lewis said.   
 
Student leader David Jeffries sees the effort as a special opportunity for video production students to work with other academic departments. 

"It is not very often the creative and logical thinkers gather in the same room to generate something that is extremely beneficial to both. The experience overall launched some great partnerships and is opening new doors and opportunities for the future," Jeffries said.