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Students, employers turn out in record numbers for eng + tech career fair

Adrienne Cornwall | Sep 30, 2013
Twenty-three employers and nearly 250 engineering and technology students turned out for Friday's Russ College Career Fair.
Twenty-three employers and nearly 250 engineering and technology students turned out for Friday's Russ College Career Fair.

OHIO students from all engineering and technology disciplines got professional from head to toe last week, greeting representatives from a record 23 national and regional employers who set up shop in Stocker Center and the Academic & Research Center for the Russ College Career Fair.

A record of nearly 250 students filled the ARC living room atrium and Stocker Center lobby Thursday for face time with employers, said Director of Professional Experiences Dean Pidcock. A major draw for the students was the engineering- and technology-specific focus of the fair, he added, which is more efficient for both parties than the university-wide fair held two days prior.

“Approximately half of the employers who came to the university-wide career fair Tuesday sought Russ College students. Between the two fairs, more than 75 companies were looking to hire Russ College talent,” Pidcock said.

The group of Russ College Career Fair employers included established recruiters like Corna Kokosing and Parker Hannifin, as well as newcomers General Mills and Chillicothe-area truck manufacturer Kenworth.

Civil engineers are the backbone of Jobes Henderson & Associates, which joined the Career Fair lineup after hiring several successful alumni from the Russ College, said Human Resources Specialist Sara Lott.

“There’s good potential here,” Lott said. “It’s been beneficial to us, along with students.”

Kraton Polymers Recruiter Kim Stewart said the company hopes to meet more potential success stories, such as the two full-time chemical engineers and current co-op student hired from the Russ College student body. She brought an alumnus as well – 2013 Russ College chemical and biomolecular engineering graduate Ben Jared, who enjoyed seeing familiar faces and offering job search advice after his nail-biting experience around graduation time in May.

“Start early,” Jared said he advised student attendees. “I probably had 80 resumes out before Christmas.”

Many enterprising students know that planning ahead will pay dividends with co-op and internship opportunities, because companies often begin recruiting in the fall for their spring, summer and following fall internship opportunities.

One of those students is computer science major Taffie Coler, who already has accumulated several internships and co-ops. She was glad to see so many software companies and found the variety of locations appealing for her next internship and full-time job search – she hopes to settle in Columbus after graduating next fall.

“Last year, a lot of the companies were from Cleveland,” Coler explained.

General Mills representative Melissa Obert, a manufacturing and engineering assistant in the company’s Wellston, Ohio plant, said she took more than a measure of pride in filling local positions that the students also seemed enthusiastic about.

“We’re getting a lot of people who are doing research ahead of time,” Obert said. “I’m really impressed with the level of confidence and competence we’ve seen today." 

Students, employers turn out in record numbers for eng + tech career fair

Adrienne Cornwall | Sep 30, 2013
Twenty-three employers and nearly 250 engineering and technology students turned out for Friday's Russ College Career Fair.
Twenty-three employers and nearly 250 engineering and technology students turned out for Friday's Russ College Career Fair.

OHIO students from all engineering and technology disciplines got professional from head to toe last week, greeting representatives from a record 23 national and regional employers who set up shop in Stocker Center and the Academic & Research Center for the Russ College Career Fair.

A record of nearly 250 students filled the ARC living room atrium and Stocker Center lobby Thursday for face time with employers, said Director of Professional Experiences Dean Pidcock. A major draw for the students was the engineering- and technology-specific focus of the fair, he added, which is more efficient for both parties than the university-wide fair held two days prior.

“Approximately half of the employers who came to the university-wide career fair Tuesday sought Russ College students. Between the two fairs, more than 75 companies were looking to hire Russ College talent,” Pidcock said.

The group of Russ College Career Fair employers included established recruiters like Corna Kokosing and Parker Hannifin, as well as newcomers General Mills and Chillicothe-area truck manufacturer Kenworth.

Civil engineers are the backbone of Jobes Henderson & Associates, which joined the Career Fair lineup after hiring several successful alumni from the Russ College, said Human Resources Specialist Sara Lott.

“There’s good potential here,” Lott said. “It’s been beneficial to us, along with students.”

Kraton Polymers Recruiter Kim Stewart said the company hopes to meet more potential success stories, such as the two full-time chemical engineers and current co-op student hired from the Russ College student body. She brought an alumnus as well – 2013 Russ College chemical and biomolecular engineering graduate Ben Jared, who enjoyed seeing familiar faces and offering job search advice after his nail-biting experience around graduation time in May.

“Start early,” Jared said he advised student attendees. “I probably had 80 resumes out before Christmas.”

Many enterprising students know that planning ahead will pay dividends with co-op and internship opportunities, because companies often begin recruiting in the fall for their spring, summer and following fall internship opportunities.

One of those students is computer science major Taffie Coler, who already has accumulated several internships and co-ops. She was glad to see so many software companies and found the variety of locations appealing for her next internship and full-time job search – she hopes to settle in Columbus after graduating next fall.

“Last year, a lot of the companies were from Cleveland,” Coler explained.

General Mills representative Melissa Obert, a manufacturing and engineering assistant in the company’s Wellston, Ohio plant, said she took more than a measure of pride in filling local positions that the students also seemed enthusiastic about.

“We’re getting a lot of people who are doing research ahead of time,” Obert said. “I’m really impressed with the level of confidence and competence we’ve seen today."