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Wednesday, Aug 27, 2014

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OHIO urged to participate in Census 2010

Completing forms insures Athens is fully represented


The United States Census, which has occurred every 10 years since 1790, gives the government an accurate assessment of the number of people living in the country and provides an outline for the allocation of financial resources. 

The United States Government plans to spend $4 trillion over a 10-year period on projects that improve the infrastructure of America. This equates to more than $400 billion per year spent on projects ranging from the building of new senior centers, new job training centers, and improving emergency services. However, the government relies on census data to accurately determine where to allocate its monetary resources.

Accurate Census data is even crucial in apportioning seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. In addition to this, many civil right organizations and advocacy groups use census data to advocate for causes, find relief for disaster victims, research business markets, as well as locate pools of skilled workers.

"Participating in the U.S. Census is important to assure that our community receives its fair share of resources and representation at the local, state, and federal level," said Becky Watts, chief of staff to the president. "This has implications for vital services for all who live and work here, including roads, schools and health care."

In March of 2010 census forms were delivered to every residence in the United States and Puerto Rico. These forms contain 10 questions that should be answered and mailed back to the Census Bureau in the postage-paid envelope provided.

People who did not mail their forms back may receive a home visit from a census taker, who will ask the same questions that appear on the form. The Census Bureau hired and trained hundreds of thousands of census takers and began sending them to every neighborhood in the country on May 1 to count each housing unit that has not returned a census form.

Census forms can be requested by calling 1‐866‐872‐6868 between 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. any day until July 31. The Census Bureau will take information over the phone or send a form by mail.