Ohio University

International

Visual storytellers share their craft at Visual Discovery Symposium

First Name
Adam
Last Name
Maslowski
August 15, 2020
Staff Reports
Professor Michael Stoll gestures to an infographic slide
Michael Stoll, professor and head of the Information Design track at Augsburg University, Germany, explains an infographic from the forthcoming Taschen book, “History of Information Graphics"

ATHENS, Ohio – The School of Visual Communication (VisCom) in Ohio University’s Scripps College of Communication hosted the Visual Discovery Symposium on Thursday, November 7, in the Athena Cinema in uptown Athens. Marking the beginning of the second annual Visual Discovery Conference, the symposium featured speakers from as far away as Germany on topics such as historical information design, infographics and extended reality (XR) design.

The symposium began with a presentation from Karl Gude, professor of practice at Michigan State University and director of the Media Sandbox. Gude’s session was titled “But I’m not Creative!” He described the common tendency people have to claim that they weren’t born creative, which Gude argued is a misconception.

“There’s no evidence that the baby in that incubator next to you is more creative than you,” Gude joked.

He outlined five ways his audience could unleash their creativity, including pushing their comfort zones, challenging assumptions and learning brainstorming techniques.

Catherine Ma, a PhD candidate at the University of Miami in Florida, presented a session on the emerging data journalism field in China and presented some of the work she created as a data journalist.

Madeline Lane, a junior publication design major at OHIO, presented her project, “Madeline through the Ages,” in which she manipulated photos from her sorority’s historic composite collections of members. Lane used Photoshop to merge the faces in six photographs from 1910-1980 with her own face. She explained that the idea evolved during discussions in the class she took from VisCom professor John Grimwade, and what she learned through the process.

“The core of who we are is generally the same, minus the goofy hairstyles and …trends,” Lane said.

Alyssa Fowers, a Data Science for the Public Good graduate fellow studying data visualization at the University of Miami, presented a session called “Reason Over Rules: Making good infographic decisions” which described a book project she is developing with renowned data visualization expert Alberto Cairo.

Ana Mojica Myers, who teaches cartography and GIS and mapping as an assistant professor of instruction at Ohio University, presented a session on web mapping.

Michael Stoll, professor and head of the Information Design track at Augsburg University, Germany, discussed a forthcoming book, “History of Information Graphics,” to which he contributed some items from his personal collection. The selected pieces included the first world map to include America, created in 1507, a first aid handbook from 1507 that included some vivid illustrations of battlefield injuries, and a warship diagram from 1705.

The presentation included some elements of instruction for the audience which was largely made up of visual communication students from OHIO and the other schools participating in the Visual Discovery Conference.

Projecting images from the 1968 book “How Babies Are Made,” Stoll praised the “calmed-down layout” as appropriate for the delicate subject matter.

“We must enable thinking,” he said. “We should not block thinking through shock, for example”

Nina Krug, Nadine Ehrenberg, Lara Thiel and Simon Schabel, all students at Augsburg University, presented a session on “Tangible, explorable infographics, and Adonis Durado, former Knight Fellow in the School of Visual Communication, presented “the World of XR.”

Roughly 70 students and faculty members continued the exploration of visual storytelling during the Visual Discovery Conference over the weekend. Attendees worked in teams to develop projects on the regionally-focused themes of mining, the Ridges and beermaking.

The conference was conceived in 2017 by a group of visual design faculty members who wanted to provide a professional-quality conference experience for their students, who are often unable to attend conferences due to cost. There was no registration fee for the Visual Discovery Conference and faculty presenters forgo their usual presenting fees in order to keep costs low.

Groups presented their projects on Monday, November 11, in Schoonover Center room 450.

 

 

Read More

To kick off the 2019 Visual Discovery Conference, practitioners from institutions around the world shared their projects and innovations at the Visual Discovery Symposium held at the Athena Cinema in uptown Athens on November 7.

Former WOUB Student Finds Perfect Job with EWTN

First Name
Adam
Last Name
Maslowski
August 15, 2020
WOUB
Read More

Former WOUB student and Ohio University Alumna Anna Mitchell hosts an international morning radio program. 

Thought leaders in visual storytelling to present at symposium Nov. 7

First Name
Sarah
Last Name
Logue
August 15, 2020
2019 Visual Discovery Conference logo

ATHENS, Ohio – The School of Visual Communication in Ohio University’s Scripps College of Communication will host the Visual Discovery Symposium on Thursday, November 7, in the Athena Cinema in uptown Athens. The symposium begins at 3 p.m. and is open to the public, with limited seating. Marking the beginning of the second annual Visual Discovery Conference, the symposium will feature speakers from as far away as Germany on topics such as historical information design, infographics and extended reality (XR) design.

The full symposium schedule is below.

Welcome
3 - 3:15 p.m.
Scott Titsworth, Tim Goheen 

But, I’m Not Creative!
3:15 - 4 p.m.
Karl Gude, Michigan State University 

Data Visualization in China
4 - 4:15 p.m.
Catherine Ma, University of Miami, Florida

“Madeline through the Ages,” sorority photo project
4:15 - 4:30 p.m.
Madeline Lane, Ohio University 

Ten-minute break

Historical Gems, new book to be published by Taschen: “History of Information Graphics”
4:40 pm - 5:15 p.m.
Michael Stoll, Augsburg University, Germany  

Reason Over Rules: Making good infographic decisions, book project with Alberto Cairo
5:15 - 5:30 p.m.
Alyssa Fowers, University of Miami, Florida  

Web mapping from A to Z
5:30 - 6 p.m.
Ana Mojica Myers, Ohio University  

Tangible, Explorable Infographics
6:00 - 6:15 p.m.
Nina Krug, Nadine Ehrenberg, Lara Thiel and Simon Schabel, Augsburg University 

The World of XR
6:15 - 6:45 p.m.
Adonis Durado, Ohio University  

Finale
6:45 - 7 p.m.
Tim Goheen/John Grimwade   

A group of roughly 60 students and faculty from Ohio University and visual communication programs at several other universities will continue the exploration of visual storytelling during the Visual Discovery Conference over the weekend. Guided by faculty members, groups of students will work in teams to develop projects on the regionally-focused themes of mining, the Ridges and beermaking.

Groups will present their projects on Monday, November 11, from 8:30 a.m.-12 p.m., in Schoonover Center room 450. That event is also free and open to the public.

 

 

 

Read More

The public is welcome to attend the Visual Discovery Symposium at the Athena Grand Thursday, November 7, at 3 p.m.

International visual storytelling conference to be held at OHIO Nov. 7-11

First Name
Sarah
Last Name
Roush
August 15, 2020
Read More

Ohio University’s Scripps College of Communication and the School of Visual Communication announce the 2019 Visual Discovery Conference. Following the inaugural conference in Venice, Italy, in 2018, this visual storytelling conference will be held on the Athens Campus Nov. 7-11, 2019.

Chagas Disease Is Being Battled By Ohio University Researchers and Students

First Name
Sarah
Last Name
Roush
August 15, 2020
Read More

Ohio University researchers and students are fighting to prevent the dreaded Chagas disease in Ecuador and its spread to the United States.

Scripps College of Communication Students Study in Spain Over Winter Break

First Name
Sarah
Last Name
Roush
August 15, 2020
group of OHIO students pose with flag

Twelve OHIO students, eleven from the Scripps College of Communication, spent their winter break in Spain studying screenwriting and documentary storytelling.  

For Emily Barbus, a student studying journalism, the program had a more profound effect on her than she anticipated. 

“I went into the program expecting to learn a little, enjoy the culture, and come back to Athens pretty similar to how I left,” Barbus said. “But this program, without sounding too cliché, changed my life.” 

The students began their course of study in the Catalonian capital of Barcelona, in northeast Spain, where they were introduced to the distinctive style of “God’s Architect,” Antoni Gaudi.

Students embraced Gaudi’s work with a visit to Parc Guell, a public park composed of gardens and architectonic elements that was originally part of Gaudi’s unsuccessful attempt to create a unique urban community.  

“Our tour guide there was phenomenal. She was interactive and lively and so sweet, which made the experience extra educational,” Sarah Abrams, a student studying journalism, said. “Plus, the actual architecture itself was just stunning.” 

The students also toured the eccentric architect’s magnum opus, La Familia Sagrada, a Roman Catholic basilica with breathtaking facades and spires that have been under construction since 1882.  

“In just four weeks, I constantly pushed myself out of my comfort zone, made lifetime friends and learned so much,” Barbus added. “I not only learned how to make and produce a documentary, but I also learned about the incredible culture of Spain, especially the architecture.” 

From Barcelona, the group flew south to Seville, the capital city of the region of Andalusia and the home base for the program. Working in teams of two, the students were required to write a documentary script about a subject they’d begun researching prior to departure.  

Caelin Parsons, a student studying media arts & studies, chose Spain’s fashion industry. 

“I really liked this project because it was so tailored to what my partner and I wanted to do,” Parsons said. “I loved having the opportunity to reach out to designers, meet them, and see how they worked.”  

Parsons said she also thought it was interesting to see the script come together and she appreciated the creative freedom she and her partner had together.  

“Making the documentary was truly my favorite part of the class aspect of this trip,” said Parsons’ project partner, Emily Barbus. 

Abrams and Morris Wein, a student studying journalism, teamed up to explore their Jewish heritage, which involved a trip to nearby Cordoba to visit a 14th century synagogue, which was one of the three best preserved Medieval synagogues in all of Spain.  

“From this project I learned a lot about my religious history in Spain as well as how to properly format a two-column script,” said Abrams. 

“Not only did I learn about making a documentary, but the four required interviews allowed me to become more immersed in the culture, and get to meet people I never would have otherwise,” Wein added.    

The ability to speak Spanish is not required to take part in the four-week program. While some interviews were recorded in English, most were conducted in Spanish with the help of student translators from the University of Seville.  

For Erick Meza, a student studying business and a first-generation Mexican American, the program afforded him the opportunity to use his Spanish language speaking skills.  

“Although I am fluent in Spanish, there are differences from country to country,” Meza said. “I still faced challenges with language barriers, pronunciations and different meanings, but I managed to quickly adapt to this new variation of Spanish and communicate efficiently.” 

Each student was also required to adapt a short story from Washington Irving’s “Tales of the Alhambra” into a short film screenplay. Students could tour the Alhambra, a palace fortress where Irving lived and wrote during the 1820s, during their two-day trip to Granada. 

“It helped me a lot in the script adaptation to actually see where it took place,” Stazy Mazo, a student studying media arts & studies, said. “The Alhambra was beautiful and it made it much easier to write the script having been there.” 

Parsons said she loved the project because her story gave her more motivation to do well on it. She added that visiting the Alhambra helped her get a better image of the story in her mind. 

In addition to the workshops, field assignments and field trips, the students met weekly with Spanish filmmakers who screened and discussed their work.  

“The screenings may have been the coolest part,” Charlie Fessler-Krebs, a student studying communication studies, said. “Getting an inside look at producers and directors and their opinions of their own pieces really helped with the development of our own scripts.” 

In addition to spending Christmas and Three Kings Day — Spain’s official end to the holiday festivities — in the ancient city of Seville, students also had the option of traveling to southern Portugal to celebrate the New Year in the Mediterranean beach town of Albufeira.  

“That trip brought everyone that went super close,” Parsons said. “The New Year’s celebration was the best one I’ve ever had. The fireworks were amazing. It was the best way to ring in the new year by far.” 

Parsons said the program was a great experience that gave her a new perspective and outlook on the world and different cultures. 

“I not only loved experiencing new things but now I want to experience as much as I can,” she said. “The trip has made me a more adventurous person.”

Applications are now being accepted for next winter break's "Screenwriting and Storytelling in Spain" program which will be held December 15, 2019 through January 11, 2020. The program is open to all OHIO students. No screenwriting experience or Spanish language skills are necessary. Acceptances are rolling, so apply now.

For more information, contact program director Frederick Lewis

Read More

Twelve OHIO students, eleven from the Scripps College of Communication, spent their winter break in Spain studying screenwriting and documentary storytelling.

Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador delegation meets with dean, faculty

First Name
Austin
Last Name
Moore
August 15, 2020
Claire Berlin

ATHENS, Ohio–On Tuesday, April 3, the Scripps College of Communication welcomed a delegation from the Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador (PUCE) while they were visiting campus April 1-8.

“I’m looking forward to learning more about the depths of possibilities for collaboration to occur between our institutions,” said Scripps College of Communication Dean Scott Titsworth. “We are excited about this next step forward for our college and to continue to expand the work our students have done in Ecuador.”

During the visit to OHIO, the PUCE officials will be holding a series of meetings with faculty, staff and students in order to discuss how the partnership may continue to grow.

“In our initial discussions, I think there are many possibilities for collaboration including ongoing student internships on the topic of environmental and scientific communication, international project-based learning classes, and immersive Spanish language training for faculty and students,” said Titsworth. “Our colleagues from PUCE are willing and able partners, so the potential for growth in our relationship is extremely high.”

While here, the delegation visited the Game Research and Immersive Design (GRID) Lab in Scripps Hall where they viewed 360-degree videos and learned more about virtual reality. The group also gave a presentation to members of the dean’s office, toured the facilities at the Schoonover Center for Communication and spoke to other faculty members at a college reception.

According to an announcement of the visit by the Office of Global Affairs, the partnership between OHIO and PUCE was first established in 2000 through a joint research project investigating Chagas Disease. Today, the partnership involves several academic areas at each institution and provides numerous benefits for students and faculty at OHIO and PUCE. More than 600 OHIO students have participated in study away programs in Ecuador thanks to the collaboration between the two institutions.

PUCE delegation members included:

  • Rector Dr. Fernando Ponce León, S.J
  • Provost Dr. Graciela Monesterolo Lencioni
  • College of Medicine Dean Dr. Francisco Pérez Pazmiño
  • College of Communication, Linguistics and Literature Dean Dr. César Eduardo Carrión
  • Linguistics Professor and Researcher Dr. Marleen Haboud

For photos of their visit to the GRID Lab and Schoonover Center see the album on our flickr page.

Read More

On Tuesday, April 3, the Scripps College of Communication welcomed a delegation from the Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador (PUCE) while they were visiting campus April 1-8.

OHIO Media Arts & Studies Lecturer Kyle Snyder presents at Audio Engineering Society Convention

First Name
Austin
Last Name
Moore
August 15, 2020
Read More

Kyle P. Snyder, a lecturer in the Ohio University School of Media Arts & Studies, presented on several topics at the 144th Audio Engineering Society Convention in Milan, Italy.

Scripps students complete 8th annual screenwriting & documentary storytelling program in Ireland

First Name
Austin
Last Name
Moore
August 15, 2020
Read More

Eleven students, seven from the School of Media Arts & Studies, two from the Journalism School, and one each from Film and Theatre, spent six weeks in Ireland this summer studying screenwriting, documentary storytelling and Irish culture.

Visiting scholar shares her positive experience in the Scripps College of Communication

First Name
Sarah
Last Name
Logue
August 15, 2020
Margaret Mary Hicks
Magda Ospina consults with her mentor Dr. Saumya Pant
Visiting scholar Magda Ospina consults with her mentor Dr. Saumya Pant

Magda Ospina has been a visiting scholar at the Scripps College of Communication since August. During her time at OHIO, Ospina said she improved her doctoral thesis and received exceptional guidance.

“The most important thing for my thesis dissertation was the extraordinary mentorship that I received,” Ospina said. “It was really an honor for me (to receive) mentorship from Dr. Saumya Pant, who is a global expert in the strategic integration of entertainment education programs.”

Pant, lecturer in the School of Media Arts & Studies, said most of her research is international and working in the developing world, so it gave her the confidence to help Ospina in her dissertation.

“It's always a pleasure to meet people like that, who are mature, who have come from lot of experience of not just academia, but real life,” Pant said of Ospina. “So she's a very humble, modest (person) and an a very eager learner here, that makes the work so much easier.

Ospina is a communication PhD candidate at the Universidad del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia, and has been an adjunct professor for about fifteen years. During that time, she also founded and directed her own consulting firm in human management.

Her dissertation focused on the effects that an entertainment-education audiovisual program had on strengthening the social skills of the Caribbean youth in Colombia.

Entertainment-education is a communication strategy used for social change. With focuses in theories such as parasocial interaction and social learning, Ospina determined what is necessary to strengthen skills and eliminate barriers within the adoption of healthy attitudes and behaviors in youth.

“The Scripps College has experts in strategic integration of entertainment education programs who have taught me that if you have a right diagnosis of a world problem,” Ospina said. “You can find the strategy to solve them.”

Among many other interests, Ospina said she is very passionate about researching the development of personal skills and wants to find strategies for a better world through communication for social change.

Read More

During her time at OHIO, visiting scholar Magda Ospina said she improved her doctoral thesis and received exceptional guidance.