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The Raymond S. Wilkes Gallery for the Visual Arts

 

Location: 5th Floor Brasee Hall
Hours: Monday through Friday - 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission is free.

 

Current & Past Shows:

"Image, Word, and Melody" event features artist reception and musical performance

 

ArtreceptionOhio University Lancaster Friends of the Library host Image, Word, and Melody, an artist reception and musical performance Thursday, February 22. The event will feature work by local artist Aaron Leu, and performances by Scott Minar, Patrick Drumm, and Franco Guerriero.

 

“Music & art, together with alumni and friends. Who could ask for anything more?“ Library Director and one of the event organizers, Judy Carey Nevin said.

 

The evening will begin with a reception of Aaron Leu’s paintings and artwork. Aaron Leu is an artist located in Lancaster, and his work is currently on display in the Raymond Wilkes Art Gallery for this Spring semester. Leu’s oil on maple painting can be described as colorful, vibrant and lively. This event will be a great opportunity to see the featured work of Leu, and to get to know an artist that is a part of Lancaster’s local arts community. The artist reception will begin at 5:15 pm. Faculty members, student, and members of the community are welcome to come join the reception, to enjoy the artwork, beverages, and hors-d'oeuvres in the Ray Wilkes Gallery for the Visual Arts.

 

Following the reception, Ohio University Lancaster faculty members, Scott Minar, Patrick Drumm, and Franco Guerriero will perform music, while giving the audience demonstrations about how songwriting, creating music, and playing music works. The performances and demonstrations will begin at 6:15, after a brief welcome and introduction.

 

Image, Word, and Melody: An Art Show and Music/Songwriting Demonstration hope to bring together the OUL community to experience an evening full of music, arts, and & culture in an interactive and unique way.

 

This exhibition is on display in the Raymond S. Wilkes Gallery for the Visual Arts in Brasee Hall throughout sprimg semester and will be on display through April.

 

The Friends of the Library organization was created in 1985 by Library Director Hannah V. McCauley. The mission of the Friends of the Library is to extend quality library and information services, generate funding for special materials and programs, and increase community awareness. The programs are funded by memberships which start at $20 for individuals ($10 for senior citizens). More information at https://www.ohio.edu/lancaster/academicsupport/library/friendsofthelibrary.cfm

 

An art exhibition featuring the work of local artist Diane Ackers is on display in the Raymond S. Wilkes Gallery for the Visual Arts beginning September 13th. An Artists’ reception will be held Thursday, September 15th from 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. Light refreshments will be served and admission is free.

 

ackers artContemporary artist Diane Ackers creates expressive art that consists of mostly nature and nonobjective work. Inspired by nature and the human spirit, Ackers combines an intuitive style of painting with techniques using texture, layers of color and strong composition. Her paintings are distinctive visual experiences with sensitivity to mood and emotion.

 

Born and raised in Lancaster, Ohio, where she resides with her husband, six children and grandson. Pursuing and creating art her entire life, she is a self-taught artist. Ackers’ primary medium is acrylic, although she often incorporates a wider variety of mediums and techniques.

 

Ackers’ art has been published in Somerset Magazine, and featured in Zsa Zsa Bellagio. She won best painting in the Westerville Art Show. She had a group show at Fairfield Library and juried shows include the Lancaster Art Walk 2014, 2015 and 2016. Ackers’ art is in collector’s homes around the world.

 

This exhibition is on display in the Raymond S. Wilkes Gallery for the Visual Arts in Brasee Hall beginning September 13th and will be on display through December 3rd.

 

Exhibition Showcases Work of Adjunct Faculty Artists

 

Ohio University Lancaster is featuring work from two adjunct art faculty this summer. The art exhibition features the work of OUL adjunct art faculty Chris Eaton and Trisha Clifford Sprouse

artshow3

Chris Eaton has taught at OUL for 29 years and is retired from his photo studio in Athens. He works with many different media and his work on display will show his versatility as well as his meticulous approach to detail and thinks of himself as an expressionistic impressionist.

 

Trisha Clifford-Sprouse has been with OUL for 5 years and is the Acting Co-Director at the Decorative Arts Center of Ohio. She works predominately with acrylic and is exploring the relationship of positive and negative space. The work on display shows how her work has evolved from non representation to landscapes and then to abstract spaces in the natural world.

 

This exhibition is on display in the Raymond S. Wilkes Gallery for the Visual Arts in Brasee Hall throughout the month of June and will be on display through July 5, 2016.

 

Monarch Gallery Art Show Artist’s Reception February 18, 2016

Lancaster, Ohio – Ohio University Lancaster welcomes the Monarch Gallery Art Show: an art exhibition featuring the Monarch Gallery Artists. An Artists’ reception will be held Thursday, February 18, 2016 from 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.

This exhibition is on display in the Raymond S. Wilkes Gallery for the Visual Arts in Brasee Hall throughout the month of February and will be on display through March 18, 2016.

Professor Trisha Clifford-Sprouse is the faculty coordinator for the exhibit. For more information, contact Clifford-Sprouse at trishacliffordsprouse@gmail.com

 

 

Robert Wright Up to Now Art ShowRobert Wright

September 17 until December 11

The fall art exhibition features the work of Robert Wright, on display in the Raymond S. Wilkes Gallery for the Visual Arts.

Artist Statement

For over forty years I have been using figurative motion as a catalyst for making art. As a deaf artist engaged in a life-long struggle to comprehend the world around me, I rely on gestural figures to chart my growth. With subconscious references to calligraphy and hieroglyphics, I try to direct the viewer away from literally interpreting what one sees toward a more internalized type of seeing. My mark-making process transforms simple gestural representations into an elusive search for clarity.

In the mixed media paintings (1999-2015), I used photos and text taken from various mass media sources to probe the world of the fashionable and powerful. I question society's seemingly insatiable appetite for images of fame, celebrity, and beauty while I ponder the mixed signals and chaos of consumer/visual culture.

My early work emphasized figurative gesture drawing in response to specific individuals. I use the figures I see like a writer taking notes and see changes in a person's gesture as signals of nonverbal communication. In my latest paintings, the gesture is a response to the human condition rather than direct, progressive studies of movement. The figures are iconic, grand hieroglyphs documenting the present state of the world seen through the eyes of American culture.

Sweeping and broad, my best works recast the figurative gesture into a form resembling the marks of an abstract expressionist. Supporting an ambiguous narrative, the marks are not about personal bravado. They are a distillation of my reactions to the movements of others. The human form is never still, but in a continuous state of movement. I think that how people move reveals a great deal about how they live.

Lately, I have been moved to do more realistic work, especially portraits. Gesture is still a primary concern of mine, hence I try to capture a more casual portrait of someone I know. I take many reference photographs and generally “compose” my primary reference from several different photos. I enjoy doing portraits because I like people, and it is another way to experience people “moving” through life. Another objective I have can be seen in my major portraits of children. As a teacher, I observe the struggle and isolation children often feel in the world they live in. The world can be huge, and the children are usually dwarfed by their environments. This is intentional. I feel my best world communicates this personal narrative.

 

 

The Raymond S. Wilkes Gallery for the Visual Arts

 

Location: 5th Floor Brasee Hall
Hours: Monday through Friday - 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Admission is free.