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English

College or Campus: College of Arts and Sciences

Student Learning Outcomes

UNDERGRADUATE

Introduction

Formally created in 1829, the English Department is one of the oldest and over time matured departments of Ohio University. Today, the English major has four distinct undergraduate specializations: Literature, Creative Writing, English Pre-law, and Cultures, Rhetoric, and Theory. While each distinct area particularly prepares students with tailored courses and professional goals, the overarching program of the English major aims to serve students who are interested in careers involving reading, writing, and critical interpretation of texts. The learning outcomes of the English major reflect these objectives.

English Department students can:

  • Read and interpret texts from multiple genres of writing, and write about them using appropriate evidence.
  • Write about texts using different critical approaches (e.g., historically-informed readings, readings based on theoretical perspectives, form-based criticism, rhetorical analysis, etc.)
  • Demonstrate an awareness of English language and literature in different national, historical, social, political, and cultural contexts.
  • Collect and sift information, and analyze and interpret a diverse variety of primary and secondary sources.
  • Communicate and present of ideas and sources accurately and effectively.

GRADUATE

Overview

The Department of English offers graduate programs at the M.A. and Ph.D. level in three subfields: Creative Writing, Literary History, and Rhetoric/Composition. While students in these concentrations share some coursework in common (especially ENG 5950: Introduction to English Studies and ENG 5890: Teaching College English), student learning objectives and assessment rubrics for Creative Writing, Literary History, and Rhetoric/Composition differ in accordance with the particular skills and knowledge base required in these disciplines.

The following materials relate to the M.A. program exclusively. Because the English Department has developed plans for major changes to the Ph.D. program (moving from a 5-year to a 4-year degree) and is currently considering whether/when to implement those plans, we have postponed our construction of an assessment document for doctoral students until we arrive at a definite decision (which is scheduled for Spring 2019).

1.  M.A. in English/Creative Writing

a) Students will reveal substantial critical knowledge of the conventions, styles, and history of the genre/genres of their own creative practice.

b) Students will demonstrate originality of thought and form in the genre/genres in which they compose their own creative work.

c) Students will exhibit a skillful use of revision techniques and strategies in their creative work.

d) Students will produce creative work that is strong enough, with or without revision, for submission to a creative writing journal or press.

e) Students will be able to articulate and defend the intellectual and imaginative choices they make in the composition of their critical and creative work (thesis defense).

2.  M.A. in English/Literary History

a) Students will understand the primary text's historical/cultural context, form, and use of stylistic conventions.

b) Students will produce original, sustained analysis of primary texts employing conceptually sophisticated thesis arguments supported by ample, accurate use of evidence and quotations.

c) Students will adeptly employ theoretical approaches/vocabulary as an interpretive framework for primary texts, as appropriate. 

d) Students will successfully locate, evaluate, and utilize existing scholarly sources to enrich their own textual analysis. 

e) Students will set their analytical work and thesis arguments within or in response to scholarly conversations within their field.

f) Students will produce an essay that is strong enough, with or without revision, for submission to an academic journal or CFP collection (Essay Option).

g) Students will articulate and defend the methodological and conceptual choices they make in the composition of their analytical work, detailing the significance of the thesis project and pointing to future research as appropriate (Thesis Option).

3. M.A. in English/Rhetoric-Composition

a) Students will demonstrate the ability to form a praxis (pedagogy informed by theoretical understanding) for the teaching of writing and composition.

b) Students will demonstrate the ability to analyze/synthesize/interpret information/evidence/data within the field of Rhetoric and Composition.

c) Students will articulate a compelling argument/research question that evolves in relationship to text and/or data.

d) Students will set the argument/research question within or in response to conversations within the field.

e) Students will successfully cite, evaluate, and utilize existing scholarly sources to incorporate into their own analysis.

f) Students will produce an essay that is strong enough, with or without revision, for submission to an academic journal or CFP collection (Essay Option).

g) Students will articulate and defend the methodological and conceptual choices they make in the composition of their analytical work, detailing the significance of the thesis project and pointing to future research as appropriate (Thesis Option).

Assessment Plan

UNDERGRADUATE

The English Department uses the following assessment strategies for measuring student learning outcomes, in three phases. Formative Assessments are based on student performances after majors have completed the genre courses ENG 2010 and ENG 2020 and the research and writing course ENG 3070J; summative Assessments are based on student accomplishments to be reflected in a capstone project completed in the senior seminar, qualitative exit interviews, and via a review of student work delivered in E-Portfolios.

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS

These are course-level assessments to gauge effectiveness of two required courses early in the English major and then at the junior level. ENG 2010, ENG 2020, and ENG 3070J are used for this phase of the assessment. The 2000-level courses provide an essential framework of knowledge and skill for students to progress effectively through the major, while ENG 3070J establishes student readiness for work in the capstone senior seminar (ENG 4600/4640/4650/4660).

ENG 2010

Learning Objectives

  • Students will develop their appreciation for the purposes and pleasures of prose fiction and nonfiction.
  • Students will articulate ways that literary works construct values and ethical meanings.
  • Students will practice analytical reading on multiple examples of each genre chosen to illuminate different literary choices and conventions, including texts that are culturally and historically diverse.
  • Students will identify major features of literary form and construct arguments about the relationship between form and the work’s meaning.

Assessment Tools

  • Knowledge of standard literary terminology evaluated by exam
  • Essay(s) or exercise(s) evaluated by rubric

ENG 2020

Learning Objectives

  • Students will develop their appreciation for the purposes and pleasures of poetry and drama.
  • Students will articulate ways that literary works construct values and ethical meanings.
  • Students will practice analytical reading on multiple examples of each genre chosen to illuminate different literary choices and conventions, including texts that are culturally and historically diverse.
  • Students will identify major features of literary form and construct arguments about the relationship between form and the work’s meaning.

Assessment Tools

  • Knowledge of standard literary terminology evaluated by exam
  • Essay(s) or exercise(s) evaluated by rubric

ENG 3070J

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • Compose an effective research essay that integrates use of primary and secondary sources
  • Construct viable research questions in English studies
  • Evaluate research sources in English studies
  • Revise a research essay
  • Use academic databases in English studies
  • Understand how genres shape reading and writing
  • Use writing and reading for inquiry, learning, thinking, and communicating
  • Integrate their own ideas with those of others
  • Understand writing as a series of tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing primary and secondary sources
  • Be aware that it takes multiple drafts to create and complete a successful text
  • Develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proof-reading
  • Learn to critique their own and others’ works
  • Develop knowledge of genre conventions ranging from structure and paragraphing to tone and mechanics
  • Practice appropriate means of documenting their work

Assessment Tools

  • Student portfolio evaluated by simple evident/not evident rubric

Steps for Implementation

For ENG 2010 and 2020, a set of uniform multiple choice questions are used to evaluate student understanding of technical literary terminology necessary for describing formal aspects of literary works. Two rubrics are used to evaluate student work: 1) basic genre analysis skills (these rubrics are different for the two classes); and 2) a rubric evaluating the student’s ability to relate literary form to meaning.

Faculty who teach ENG 2010 and ENG 2020 administer the multiple choice evaluation when appropriate within their course and evaluate one or more writing coursework based on the rubrics evaluating formal knowledge and analysis.

For ENG 3070J, a portfolio of all student work from the semester will be evaluated to determine whether the learning outcomes are evident or not evident.

Faculty who teach ENG 3070J will require students to compile portfolios and review them to determine whether each learning outcome is evident in the coursework completed.

Feedback from student performance is used to guide the program in the continuous improvement cycle of student performance, curriculum, and teaching.

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS

ENG 4600/4640/4650/4660 (senior seminar)

Learning Objectives

4600

Students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate complex understanding of the course’s topic
  • Critically engage with scholarship on the topic
    • Complete a substantial research-based project that includes sustained scholarly writing
  • Synthesize viewpoints from a variety of scholars and multiple texts in a final project
    • Effectively present information orally through class discussion and/or class presentation.
  • Compose increasingly complex analytical projects over the course of the semester.

4640/4650/4660

Students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to expertly navigate research sources, both printed and electronic
  • Critically engage with scholarship on works by the author(s) studied
  • Demonstrate complex understanding of the works of the author(s) studied
  • Complete a substantial research-based project that includes sustained scholarly writing
  • Integrate multiple scholarly sources on the author[s] studies in a final project.
  • Effectively present information orally through class discussion and/or class presentation.
  • Compose increasingly sophisticated analytical projects over the course of the semester.

Assessment Tools

  • Oral communication skills and increasingly sophisticated projects evaluated as evident/not evident
  • Research project evaluated by rubric

Steps for Implementation

Faculty teaching the senior seminar will assess student oral communication and increasing sophistication of work over the term as evident/not evident. They will evaluate the final research project by rubric.

Student E-portfolios

Materials are uploaded to the e-portfolios continuously during the student’s major progress. under the oversight of the departmental academic advisor. In the senior year, concurrent with the senior seminar, students will finalize their portfolios for assessment. Portfolios may include some combination of student essays, personal narratives, journals, creative and critical work of students, coursework assignments, and study abroad reports.

Assessment Tool

  • Evaluated by e-portfolios

Steps for Implementation

The departmental academic advisor will use normal advising sessions assure that students are regularly uploading appropriate coursework and/or personal projects to their e-portfolios. In the senior year, concurrent with the senior seminar, an assigned faculty member taken from a small pool of trained portfolio advisors will assist graduating students in selecting material to include in the final portfolio that will most effectively demonstrate major learning outcomes

The department Assessment Committee will assess at least 15% of student e-portfolios to see that student writings actually reflect solid knowledge of the discipline and that students can analyze and write effectively about diverse topics in an effective and organized manner. 

Exit Interviews

Objectives

The English Department will supplement faculty review of student learning with qualitative data of student’s perception of their own learning and departmental experience.

Assessment tool

  • Structured in-person interview

Steps for Implementation

In the spring, members of the Department Assessment Committee will conduct interviews with students who are currently enrolled in or who in the fall completed their senior seminar. The Committee will prepare a written summary of interview results designed to assist the English Department with evaluating its curriculum, advising processes, other departmental student activities, and the major outcomes themselves for continuous improvement in improving learning and meeting student needs.

Assessment Strategies

The outcomes for the major are synthetic and designed to be reached through any of a very large variety of possible course combinations. In addition, the capstone project in the senior seminar is the culmination of a semester-long course, but not a semester-long project, and may take a variety of forms. The English Department has thus opted for a multi-pronged approach.

At the center of this approach is the portfolio-based assessment. Each objective has a detailed rubric for scoring the portfolio as a whole from 1 (does not meet objective) to 4 (exceeds objective), with subsections for objectives 4 and 5.

Exit interviews are meant to gauge how students’ understand their own learning as English majors and to help the Department respond to their own perceptions of their needs.

GRADUATE

Assessment Rubrics: M.A. Essay in English/Literary History or English/Rhetoric-Composition

Creative Writing does not offer students the option of writing the M.A. Essay. The following description of the M.A. Essay appears in the English Department's Guidelines and Procedures for Graduate Study:

"The Master's Essay entails a minimum of 25 pages of scholarly or critical writing, modeled on the academic journal article. The essay is expected to show originality, rigor of argument, and thoroughness of research. The Master's Essay may begin as a seminar paper, but it requires significantly more research and reflection than is usually possible in that form.

The student prepares the essay while registered for English 6930 under the direction of a member of the English graduate [Group I] faculty. The student should have chosen a Director by the end of the Fall semester of the second year. Late in the Fall or early in the Spring, the student should submit to the Director a short prospectus (5-10 pages) that describes the essay topic, reviews relevant criticism, and discusses the student's theoretical perspective. During the writing of the essay, usually in the Spring semester, the student enrolls in English 6930.

The Master's Essay must be submitted no later than the last day of class of the semester in which the student intends to graduate. Within a week's time thereafter, the essay Director must inform the Director of Graduate Studies of whether the essay is satisfactory or unsatisfactory; the essay director has the option of giving a satisfactory essay either a letter grade or credit."

1. Assessment Rubric for M.A. Essay in English/Literary History:

Component

Excellent (3)

Satisfactory (2)

Unsatisfactory, but some sign of effort is present (1)

Contextual knowledge of primary work.

Essay shows extensive understanding of the primary text's historical/cultural context, form, and use of stylistic conventions.

Essay shows clear understanding of the primary text's historical/cultural context, form, and use of stylistic conventions.

Essay shows partial understanding of the primary text's historical/cultural context, form, and use of stylistic conventions.

Thesis-driven analysis and support of argument.

Essay shows original, cohesive, thorough analysis of primary texts, employing a focused, conceptually sophisticated thesis argument supported by ample, accurate use of evidence and quotations.

 

 

Essay shows sustained analysis of primary texts, employing a focused thesis argument supported by accurate use of evidence and quotations.

 

 

Essay shows plausible analysis of primary texts, employing an unfocused thesis argument supported by some use of evidence and quotations.

 

 

Theoretical grounding.

Essay insightfully and appropriately employs theoretical approaches/

vocabulary as an interpretive framework for primary texts.

Essay employs theoretical approaches/vocabulary as an interpretive framework for primary texts.

Essay attempts to employ theoretical approaches/vocabulary as an interpretive framework for primary texts.

Use of relevant research or scholarly sources.

Essay knowledgeably cites, evaluates, and utilizes relevant scholarly sources to illuminate its own analysis.

 

Essay adequately cites, evaluates, and utilizes relevant scholarly sources in relation to its own analysis.

 

Essay occasionally cites, evaluates, and utilizes relevant scholarly sources.

Positioning of essay in the disciplinary field.

Essay carefully positions its argument and analysis within or in response to existing scholarly conversations.

Essay acknowledges how its argument and analysis relate to existing scholarly conversations.

Essay's argument and analysis show some awareness of existing scholarly conversations, but do not directly respond to them.

Contribution to scholarship.

Essay is strong enough, with minor revision, for submission to an academic journal or CFP collection.

 

Essay is strong enough, with some revision to form and content, for submission to an academic journal or CFP collection.

Essay requires substantive revision for submission to an academic journal or CFP collection.

Possible Points: 18

18-16 = Excellent

15-9 = Satisfactory

8 or below = Unsatisfactory

Score and Comments:__________________________________________________

 

2. Assessment Rubric for M.A. Essay in English/Rhetoric-Composition:

Component

Excellent (3)

Satisfactory (2)

Unsatisfactory, but some sign of effort is present (1)

Formation of a praxis (pedagogy informed by theoretical understanding) for the teaching of writing and composition.

Essay provides a clear, coherent, well-informed praxis for the teaching of writing and composition.

Essay provides a coherent praxis for the teaching of writing and composition.

Essay attempts to articulate a praxis for the teaching of writing and composition.

Ability to synthesize, analyze, and interpret information/ evidence/data relevant to field.

Essay clearly and effectively demonstrates the ability to synthesize, analyze, and interpret information/evidence/ data within the field of Rhetoric and Composition.

 

Essay demonstrates the ability to synthesize, analyze, and interpret information/evidence/data within the field of Rhetoric and Composition.

 

Essay demonstrates some ability to synthesize, analyze, and interpret information/evidence/data within the field of Rhetoric and Composition.

Formation of research question in relation to text and/or data.

Essay forms and clearly articulates a compelling argument or research question that evolves in relationship to text and/or data.

 

Essay forms and articulates a plausible argument or research question that evolves in relationship to text and/or data.

Essay attempts to form and articulate an argument or research question that evolves in relationship to text and/or data.

Positioning of essay in the disciplinary field.

Essay carefully positions its argument and analysis within or in response to existing scholarly conversations.

Essay acknowledges how its argument and analysis relates to existing scholarly conversations

Essay argument and analysis shows some awareness of existing scholarly conversations, but does not directly respond to them.

Use of relevant research or scholarly sources.

Essay knowledgeably cites, evaluates, and utilizes existing scholarly sources to incorporate into its analysis.

Essay adequately cites, evaluates, and utilizes existing scholarly sources to incorporate into its own analysis.

Essay occasionally cites, evaluates, and utilizes existing scholarly sources to incorporate into its own analysis.

Contribution to scholarship.

Essay is strong enough, with minor revision, for submission to an academic journal or CFP collection.

 

Essay is strong enough, with some revision to form and content, for submission to an academic journal or CFP collection.

 

Essay requires substantive revision for submission to an academic journal or CFP collection.

 

Possible Points: 18

18-16 = Excellent

15-9 = Satisfactory

8 or below = Unsatisfactory

Score and Comments:__________________________________________________

 

Assessment Rubrics: M.A. Thesis in English/Creative Writing, English/Literary History, or English/Rhetoric-Composition

The following general description of the M.A. Thesis appears in the English Department's Guidelines and Procedures for Graduate Study; the description of the M.A. Thesis in Creative Writing appears in the Department's Handbook for Creative Writers:

"A non-creative Master's Thesis requires a minimum of 50 pages of scholarly or critical writing and is expected to show originality, rigor of argument, and thoroughness of research and documentation. The Master's Thesis should, however, include more extensive research than the Master's Essay, particularly more detailed analysis of the theoretical approach being used, a wider and deeper survey of research and scholarship, and a more thorough contextualization of the central argument.

The Master's Thesis committee consists of a Director and two readers. One reader may be from outside the department. The student should ask a graduate [Group I] faculty member to serve as thesis Director no later than Fall semester of the second year. At that time, the student and Director may discuss possible readers, who should be selected and asked to serve. Sometime in the Fall semester the student should give a thesis prospectus of about 10 pages to the thesis committee, and as soon as possible the committee should approve this proposal or ask for revisions.

The M.A. Thesis in Creative Writing represents the student’s best creative work in his or her genre of specialization; it should be completed during the student’s two years in the program and revised in response to suggestions from the thesis Director and other faculty. The thesis is generally a collection of short stories, poems, or essays; the work in the thesis is expected to be in one of the three genres. With the approval of the thesis Director, the student may choose to offer one long piece (a novella, long poem, or long essay) as the thesis. Guidelines for thesis length are flexible, but a poetry thesis will seldom be shorter than 40 pages, and a fiction or nonfiction thesis will seldom be shorter than 80 pages. (If a student is including work that is multimodal/digital, or work in other non-traditional formats, the exact contribution of the work and how the work might change the “expected” page count will be worked out on a case by case basis by the student and the thesis/dissertation committee.)  The creative thesis is not expected to be a full, book-length manuscript, but it should be a step toward a future book; thus the student should seek ways in which the parts of the thesis can support and enrich each other.

Working with the thesis Director, candidates for the M.A. in Creative Writing write a short critical introduction to the creative thesis (10-12 pages in length, in addition to the page expectations listed in the paragraphs above). This prologue is not a paper separate from the thesis but related to it. It is intended to contextualize the thesis, and in doing so it may explicate some aspect of the creative thesis or element of craft, or it may discuss the writer’s influences.

Creative Writing students should request that a Creative Writing faculty member serve as their thesis committee Director early in the Fall semester of the second year. Once a professor agrees to direct the thesis, the Director of Creative Writing should be notified and two additional readers should be chosen. It is expected that the thesis committee will include a second professor of Creative Writing: a writer in the student's genre, if possible. The third member of the thesis committee may be either a Creative Writing professor or a professor from Literature or Rhetoric/Composition. Specific deadlines for thesis drafts should be set with the Director no later than the second week of Spring semester.

To receive thesis credit, the student must enroll in English 6950 during the final semester of the second year. The student must consult with the committee to schedule a date for the thesis defense, to take place at least one month before the last day of classes of the semester of graduation . . . . A final draft of the thesis must be in the committee's hands at least two weeks before the defense. If the student passes the defense, the committee may or may not ask for a few final revisions before the student submits the thesis to the College of Arts and Sciences."

1. Assessment Rubric for M.A. Thesis in English/Creative Writing:

Part I: Written Thesis

           

Component

Excellent (3 points)

Satisfactory (2 points)

Unsatisfactory, but some sign of effort is present (1 point)

Knowledge of genre (critical essay).

Critical essay demonstrates

substantial knowledge of the conventions, styles, and history of the genre in which student's creative work is composed.

Critical essay demonstrates

competent knowledge of the conventions, styles and history of the genre in which student's creative work is composed.

Critical essay demonstrates superficial knowledge of the conventions, styles, and history of the genre in which student's creative work is composed.

Mastery of genre (creative work).

Student's creative work demonstrates substantial mastery of literary form, stylistic innovation, and obvious display of an original individual literary voice. 

Student's creative work demonstrates attempts to master literary form, some stylistic innovation, and some display of an original individual literary voice. 

Student's creative work demonstrates awareness of literary form, and little or no display of stylistic innovation and/or an original individual literary voice. 

Revision techniques and strategies.

Student's creative work reveals skillful, sensitive use of techniques and strategies for revision. 

Student's creative work reveals attention to techniques and strategies for revision.

Student's creative work reveals some awareness of techniques and strategies for revision.

Potential for publication.

Student's creative work is strong enough, with minor revision, for submission to a creative writing journal.

 

Student's creative work is strong enough, with some revision to form and content, for submission to a creative writing journal.

 

 

Student's creative work requires substantive revision before submission to a creative writing journal.

 

 

Possible Points: 12

12-9 = Excellent

8-5 = Satisfactory

4 or below = Unsatisfactory

Score and Comments:__________________________________________________

 

Part II. Oral Defense of Written Thesis

Component

Excellent (3 points)

Satisfactory (2 points)

Unsatisfactory, but some sign of effort is present (1 point)

In the course of the oral presentation, students cogently articulate and defend intellectual and imaginative choices they have made in both the composition of the critical essay and the creative manuscript.

 

 

 

 

Possible Points: 3

3 = Excellent

2 = Satisfactory

1 = Unsatisfactory

Score and Comments:_________________________________________________

Total Possible Points for Written Thesis and Oral Defense: 15

15-12 = Excellent

11-8 = Satisfactory

7-below = Unsatisfactory

2. Assessment Rubric for M.A. Thesis in English/Literary History:

Part I: Written Thesis

Component

Excellent (3)

Satisfactory (2)

Unsatisfactory, but some sign of effort is present (1)

Contextual knowledge of primary work.

Thesis shows extensive understanding of the primary text's historical/cultural context, form, and use of stylistic conventions.

Thesis shows clear understanding of the primary text's historical/cultural context, form, and use of stylistic conventions.

Thesis shows partial understanding of the primary text's historical/cultural context, form, and use of stylistic conventions.

Thesis-driven analysis and support of argument.

Thesis shows original, cohesive, thorough analysis of primary texts, employing a focused, conceptually sophisticated thesis argument supported by ample, accurate use of evidence and quotations.

 

 

Thesis shows sustained analysis of primary texts, employing a focused thesis argument supported by accurate use of evidence and quotations.

 

 

Thesis shows plausible analysis of primary texts, employing an unfocused thesis argument supported by some use of evidence and quotations.

 

 

Sustained coherence of argument and evidence.

Thesis clearly maintains the principal argument and seamlessly connects textual material across multiple chapters.

Thesis maintains the principal argument and connects textual material across multiple chapters.

Thesis shows difficulty maintaining the principal argument and connecting textual material across multiple chapters.

Theoretical grounding.

Thesis insightfully and appropriately employs theoretical approaches/

vocabulary as an interpretive framework for primary texts.

Thesis employs theoretical approaches/vocabulary as an interpretive framework for primary texts.

Thesis attempts to employ theoretical approaches/vocabulary as an interpretive framework for primary texts.

Use of relevant research or scholarly sources.

Thesis knowledgeably cites, evaluates, and utilizes relevant scholarly sources to illuminate its own analysis.

 

Thesis adequately cites, evaluates, and utilizes relevant scholarly sources in relation to its own analysis.

 

Thesis occasionally cites, evaluates, and utilizes relevant scholarly sources.

Positioning of scholarly work in the disciplinary field.

Thesis carefully positions its argument and analysis within or in response to existing scholarly conversations.

Thesis acknowledges how its argument and analysis relate to existing scholarly conversations.

Thesis's argument and analysis show some awareness of existing scholarly conversations, but do not directly respond to them.

Possible Points: 18

18-6 = Excellent

15-9 = Satisfactory

8 or below = Unsatisfactory

Score and Comments:__________________________________________________

 

Part II: Oral Defense

Component

Excellent (3 points)

Satisfactory (2 points)

Unacceptable, but some sign of effort is present (1 point)

Understanding and explanation of project.

Student clearly and precisely articulates the purpose, rationale, arguments, methodology, and scope of the thesis project.

Student clearly articulates the purpose, rationale, arguments, methodology, and scope of the thesis project.

Student is able to articulate the purpose, rationale, arguments, methodology, and scope of the thesis project.

Positioning of project amid existing research.

Student clearly and precisely communicates how the thesis project responds to, amends, and/or extends existing research in the field.

Student clearly communicates how the thesis project responds to, amends, and/or extends existing research in the field.

Student is able to communicate how the thesis project responds to, amends, and/or extends existing research in the field.

Understanding of project's significance to the field.

Student clearly and precisely details the significance of the thesis project and points to future research, as appropriate.

Student clearly details the significance of the thesis project and points to future research, as appropriate.

Student is able to detail the significance of the thesis project and points to future research, as appropriate.

Ability to answer questions regarding project.

Student addresses questions and concerns of committee members with accuracy and knowledge.

Student accurately addresses questions and concerns of committee members.

Student is able to address questions and concerns of committee members.

Possible Points: 12

12-10 = Excellent

9-7 = Satisfactory

6 or below = Unsatisfactory

Score and Comments:__________________________________________________

Total Possible Points for Written Thesis and Oral Defense: 30

30-23 = Excellent

22-15 = Satisfactory

14-below = Unsatisfactory

3. Assessment Rubric for M.A. Thesis in English/Rhetoric-Composition:

Part I: Written Thesis

Component

Excellent (3)

Satisfactory (2)

Unsatisfactory, but some sign of effort is present (1)

Formation of a praxis (pedagogy informed by theoretical understanding) for the teaching of writing and composition.

Thesis provides a clear, coherent, well-informed praxis for the teaching of writing and composition.

Thesis provides a coherent praxis for the teaching of writing and composition.

Thesis attempts to articulate a praxis for the teaching of writing and composition.

Ability to synthesize, analyze, and interpret information/ evidence/data relevant to field.

Thesis clearly and effectively demonstrates the ability to synthesize, analyze, and interpret information/evidence/ data within the field of Rhetoric and Composition.

 

Thesis demonstrates the ability to synthesize, analyze, and interpret information/evidence/data within the field of Rhetoric and Composition.

 

Thesis demonstrates some ability to synthesize, analyze, and interpret information/evidence/data within the field of Rhetoric and Composition.

Formation of research question in relation to text and/or data.

Thesis forms and clearly articulates a compelling argument or research question that evolves in relationship to text and/or data.

 

Thesis forms and articulates a plausible argument or research question that evolves in relationship to text and/or data.

Thesis attempts to form and articulate an argument or research question that evolves in relationship to text and/or data.

Positioning of essay in the disciplinary field.

Thesis convincingly positions its argument and analysis within or in response to existing scholarly conversations.

Thesis acknowledges how its argument and analysis relates to existing scholarly conversations

Thesis's argument and analysis shows some awareness of existing scholarly conversations, but does not directly respond to them.

Use of relevant research or scholarly sources.

Thesis knowledgeably cites, evaluates, and utilizes existing scholarly sources to incorporate into its analysis.

Thesis adequately cites, evaluates, and utilizes existing scholarly sources to incorporate into its own analysis.

Thesis occasionally cites, evaluates, and utilizes existing scholarly sources to incorporate into its own analysis.

Sustained coherence of argument and evidence.

Thesis clearly maintains the principal argument and seamlessly connects textual material across multiple chapters.

Thesis maintains the principal argument and connects textual material across multiple chapters.

Thesis shows difficulty maintaining the principal argument and connecting textual material across multiple chapters.

Possible Points: 18

18-6 = Excellent

15-9 = Satisfactory

8 or below = Unsatisfactory

Score and Comments:__________________________________________________

 

Part II: Oral Defense

Component

Excellent (3 points)

Satisfactory (2 points)

Unacceptable, but some sign of effort is present (1 point)

Understanding and explanation of project.

Student clearly and precisely articulates the purpose, rationale, arguments, methodology, and scope of the thesis project.

Student clearly articulates the purpose, rationale, arguments, methodology, and scope of the thesis project.

Student is able to articulate the purpose, rationale, arguments, methodology, and scope of the thesis project.

Positioning of project amid existing research.

Student clearly and precisely communicates how the thesis project responds to, amends, and/or extends existing research in the field.

Student clearly communicates how the thesis project responds to, amends, and/or extends existing research in the field.

Student is able to communicate how the thesis project responds to, amends, and/or extends existing research in the field.

Understanding of project's significance to the field.

Student clearly and precisely details the significance of the thesis project and points to future research, as appropriate.

Student clearly details the significance of the thesis project and points to future research, as appropriate.

Student is able to detail the significance of the thesis project and points to future research, as appropriate.

Ability to answer questions regarding project.

Student addresses questions and concerns of committee members with accuracy and knowledge.

Student accurately addresses questions and concerns of committee members.

Student is able to address questions and concerns of committee members.

Possible Points: 12

12-10 = Excellent

9-7 = Satisfactory

6 or below = Unsatisfactory

Score and Comments:__________________________________________________

Total Possible Points for Written Thesis and Oral Defense: 30

30-23 = Excellent

22-15 = Satisfactory

14-below = Unsatisfactory

 

 

 

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Use of Student Learning Evidence

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