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Executive Orders and International Travel Information

United States Department of Homeland Security announces the end of program granting Temporary Protected Status for El Salvador -   Jan. 8, 2018

Governments of the United States and Turkey mutually suspend non-immigrant visa services - Oct. 8, 2017

Presidential Proclamation Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry Into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats -   Signed on Sept.24, 2017

 

Executive Order: Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States - Signed March 6, 2017

Executive Order 13769: Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States by Foreign Nationals - Signed Jan. 27, 2017

Executive Order 13768: Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States - Signed Jan. 25, 2017

Change to international travel carry-on items:  Aviation Security Enhancements for Select Last Point of Departure Airports with Commercial Flights to the United States

Termination of Temporary Protected Status for El Salvador

On Monday, Jan. 8, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced that it is ending temporary protected status for nearly 200,000 Salvadorans who fled their earthquake-ravaged country years ago.

Trump admin ends protected status for 200K Salvadoran refugees - United Presss International, Jan. 8, 2018

US ends protections for Salvadoran immigrants, sparking fear - Associated Presss, Jan. 8, 2018

Clock is ticking for Salvadoran immigrants after protected status terminated -  Houston Chronicle, Jan. 9, 2018

Save the Salvadorans -  New York Times Opinion Piece by David Leonhardt, Jan. 8, 2018.

 

Suspension of non-immigrant visa services with Turkey 

On Monday, Oct. 9, U.S. Ambassador John Bass issued a statement about the U.S. government’s decision to suspend non-immigrant visa services at our embassy and consulates in Turkey, and to explain what this suspension means.

On Tuesday, Oct. 10, International Student and Faculty Services sent out this email message  to with information about the situation to Ohio University students from Turkey.

Presidential Proclamation Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry Into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats

On Tuesday, June 26, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the federal government's travel ban  on travel to the United States by residents of six mostly Muslim countries.

On Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court announced that it is allowing the Trump administration to fully enforce a ban on travel to the United States by residents of six mostly Muslim countries.

On Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017,  a federal court largely blocked the latest version of the travel ban from going into place on Oct. 18. The court action temporarily stops the ban from going into place, except for in respect to North Korea and Venezuala. 

On Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, President Trump issued a new proclamation that places restrictions on travel from eight countries. The new proclamation, which will go into effect on Oct. 18, 2017, adds the countries of North Korea, Venezuala and Chad to the previously announced travel ban, while it removes Sudan from the list. The restrictions for travelers from Venezuala apply only to select government officials and family members.

Court upholds Trump travel ban, rejects discrimination claim - Associated Press, June 26, 2018

Supreme Court allows full enforcement of Trump travel ban - Associated Press, Dec. 4, 2017

Supreme court backs Trump travel ban - BBC News, Dec. 4, 2017

Federal judge blocks Trump’s third travel ban - Washington Post, Oct. 17, 2017

Judge in Hawaii blocks latest version of Trump’s travel ban - Associated Presss, Oct. 17, 2017

Trump travel ban extended to blocks on North Korea, Venezuela and Chad - The Guardian, Sept. 25, 2017

White House expands travel ban, restricting visitors from eight countries -  The Washington, Post, Sept. 25, 2017

New Order Indefinitely Bars Almost All Travel From Seven Countries - New York Times, Sept. 24 2017

Supreme Court Cancels Hearing on Previous Trump Travel Ban -  New York Times, Sept. 25, 2017

Trump signs new travel ban with enhanced vetting - CBS News, Sept. 24, 2017

Executive Order: Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States

 

On Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the federal government's attempts to prevent extended family members of Americans from entering the country as part of the president's executive order banning travel from six majority-Muslim countries. The federal court said the administration can't exclude grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins in its attempts to comply with the U.S. Supreme Court's limitations on the revised travel ban.

 

On Monday, June 26, 2017,  The U.S. Supreme Court announced that it is letting a limited version of President Donald Trump’s ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries take effect. The Supreme Court will hear full arguments about the travel ban proposal in October.

According to the Supreme Court announcement and explained in this article, students from the named countries in the executive order who have been admitted to study at an American university will still be able to enter the country.

On Thursday, May 25, 2017, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the nationwide block of the executive order temporarily restricting travel from the six countries of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen

On Wednesday, March 15, 2017, a federal judge in Hawaii issued a nationwide temporary restraining order (“TRO”) that prohibits the U.S. government from enforcing an executive order that sought to suspend the entry of nationals from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen, and refugees from all countries.  The travel entry suspension was due to take effect on Thursday, March 16, at 12:01am, but is now on hold. 

The TRO was issued in a lawsuit brought by the State of Hawaii against the Trump Administration.  The Administration is expected to appeal the court's decision and could seek an emergency stay of the TRO. In addition, plaintiffs in other lawsuits sought separate TROs against the executive order today, meaning that further rulings could be issued.  

The Trump Administration's travel ban order sought to prohibit nationals of the six restricted countries from entering the United States for 90 days and refugees for 120 days, unless they qualified for an exemption or were granted a waiver.  Among others, the executive order exempted U.S. lawful permanent residents, holders of valid U.S. visas, foreign nationals present in the U.S. on the effective date of the order, those holding a valid advance parole document, certain refugees, and dual nationals traveling on a passport from a non-restricted country. 

The TRO means that foreign nationals who would have been subject to the executive order should be able to apply for visas and enter the United States, provided they are otherwise admissible.  However, when planning travel to the United States these individuals should be aware that future rulings could permit the federal government to enforce the entry suspension.
We will continue to provide updates as they become available.

 

On March 6, 2017, President Trump issued a new executive order “Executive Order Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into The United States,” which takes effect on March 16, 2017. Among other things:

1) The order suspends entry of citizens and nationals of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen for 90 days beginning March 16.

The order does not apply to the following individuals:

* Lawful Permanent Residents.

* Individuals who already have valid visas.

* Dual nationals travelling on a passport issued by a non-designated country.

* Individuals with documents other than a visa (e.g. an advance parole document) that permit travel to the U.S.

* Individuals travelling on diplomatic visas, NATO visas, C-2 visas, or G visas.

* Asylees, refugees, and individuals granted withholding of removal, advance parole, or protection under the Convention Against Torture.

Further, consular officers and Customs and Border Protection officials have discretion to issue a visa or permit entry into the U.S. on a case-by-case basis.

2) The order generally suspends refugees from all countries from entering the U.S. for 120 days beginning March 16, but does not apply to refugees already scheduled for transit. The order also suspends the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) from adjudicating refugee applications for 120 days.

3) The order suspends the Visa Interview Waiver Program. This program allowed eligible foreign nationals to apply to renew their nonimmigrant visa without an in-person interview at the U.S. consulate or embassy.

The full text of the Executive Order is available here. Additional sources of information include:

* Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Q&A : Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry To The United States

* DHS Fact Sheet: Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry To The United States

* DHS Executive Orders on Protecting the Homeland - Includes links to Executive Orders, Presidential Memos, Implementation Memos, Fact Sheets, Press Releases, and Additional Information/Links.

* Presidential Memorandum, Memorandum for the Secretary of State, the Attorney General, The Secretary of Homeland Security

* Department of State statement: Important information on Executive Order – Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.

* National Association of International Educators (NAFSA) 

American Council on Education:  Issues for Consideration by Trustees and Presidents Related to the March 6, 2017 U.S. President's Executive Order

Recent news reports about the executive order include:

United Press International report from Sept. 7, 2017 - 9th Circuit narrows Trump's travel ban 

Associated Press report from June 26, 2017 - Trump travel ban partly reinstated; fall court arguments set

Washington Post report from June 26, 2017 - Supreme Court allows limited version of Trump’s travel ban to take effect and will consider case in fall

New York Times report from June 26, 2017 - Supreme Court Will Hear Travel Ban Case

CNBC report from May 25, 2017 - 4th Circuit Court of Appeals upholds the block of the executive order.

Washington Post article from May 25, 2017 - Federal appeals court largely maintains freeze of Trump’s travel ban

CNN report from April 3, 2017 - 9th Circuit will hear travel ban suit in May

Los Angeles Times report from April 3, 2017 - 9th Circuit puts Trump's travel ban on fast-track review

USA Today article from March 29, 2017 - Hawaii judge extends halt on Trump travel ban

Executive Order 13769: Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States by Foreign Nationals

  • On March 6, 2017, a new Executive Order was issued that revoked Executive Order 13769. That order is shown above.
  • On Feb. 16, 2017 President Trump announced in a news conference that his administration would issue a new executive action related to Executive Order 13769 durng the week of Feb. 19-25. The details of any new exeuctive action are unclear. President Trump also stated in the news conference that his administration is appealing the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision that upheld the nationwide injunction blocking Executive Order 13769. The transcript of the entire news conference is available  here. 
  • On Feb. 9, 2017, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the nationwide injunction blocking President Donald Trump's executive order to close U.S. borders to certain immigrants and refugees worldwide. The court decision means that refugees and people from the seven nations identified in the president's Jan. 27, 2017 executive order can continue entering the country. The case will now likely continue on to a higher court. 
  • On Feb. 7, 2017, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals heard oral arguments on the government's request for an emergency stay of the District Court's temporary restraining order. The 3-judge panel recognized the public's interest and the urgency of the matter, and stated its intention to render the court's decision as soon as possible. The decision and other court documents will be made available on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals website
  • On Feb. 5, 2017, a federal appeals court refused to issue an immediate reinstatement and asked both sides to submit additional documentation. 
  • On Feb. 4, 2017, the Trump administration asked a federal appeals court to reinstate the ban.  
  • On Feb. 3, 2017, the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington in Seattle issued a temporary restraining order (TRO) that blocks significant portions of the Executive Order from being enforced.  Information coming from the Department of Homeland Security indicates that immigration officials have been instructed to resume the admission procedures that were used before the Executive Order was put into place. Airlines are being instructed to allow visa holders of the 7 affected countries, as well as refugees with the proper documentation, to board flights. The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that they continue to process benefit requests from individuals regardless of their country of origin. Examples of these benefits include, but not limited to, OPT, changes of status, reinstatements, H-1B petitions, and adjustment of status applications. 
  • On Jan. 27, 2017, President Trump signed Executive Order 13769, "Protecting the Nation from Terrorist Entry into the United States by Foreign Nationals." Under Section 3(c) of that Executive Order, entry into the United States of most "immigrants and nonimmigrants" from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Yemen was suspended for 90 days from the date the Executive Order was signed. Implementation of the Section 3(c) "entry ban" has generated protest, interpretive questions, application issues, and litigation that have impacted implementation of the ban.

Source: the NAFSA Association of International Educators

Executive Order 13768: Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States

On Jan. 25, 2017, President Trump signed "Executive Order 13768: Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States."   Executive Order 13768  seeks to impose the “faithful execution” of U.S. immigration laws by executive agencies.

The Order calls for:

1) enforcing immigration laws, prioritizing removable aliens who have been convicted of or charged with criminal offenses

2) hiring 10,000 new Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers to carry out the enforcement, subject to Congressional appropriations

3) empowering State and local law enforcement agencies to perform the functions of an immigration officer

4) ending federal grants to sanctuary jurisdictions, except as mandated by law.  

Here are a few recent news articles related to Executive Order 13768

NPR article - Attorney General orders crackdown on "Sanctuary Cities," threatens holding funds

NPR article - "Sanctuary Cities" Promise Legal Fight After Sessions Threatens Funds

Aviation Security Enhancements for Select Last Point of Departure Airports with Commercial Flights to the United States

On March, 21, 2017, the federal government issued Fact Sheet:  Aviation Security Enhancements for Select Last Point of Departure Airports with Commercial Flights to the United States

The aviation security enhancements will include requiring that all personal electronic devices larger than a cell phone or smart phone be placed in checked baggage at 10 airports where flights are departing for the United States.

The affected overseas airports are:

  • Queen Alia International Airport (AMM)
  • Cairo International Airport (CAI)
  • Ataturk International Airport (IST)
  • King Abdul-Aziz International Airport (JED)
  • King Khalid International Airport (RUH)
  • Kuwait International Airport (KWI)
  • Mohammed V Airport (CMN)
  • Hamad International Airport (DOH)
  • Dubai International Airport (DXB)
  • Abu Dhabi International Airport (AUH).

Additional information can be found here.


   

   
   

   
   

   
   

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