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Electrical Engineering Labs

Our lab facilities for students in the electrical engineering program include course-specific labs as well as labs for general survey courses. Select a lab below to find out more detail about available equipment and usage.

 

Sophomore Laboratory - Stocker Center Room 315

The Sophomore laboratory is used for three of the required courses for the Electrical Engineering major; EE 1014 Introduction to Electrical Engineering, EE 2213 Instrumentation Laboratory, and EE 2114 Circuits II. EE 1014 develops knowledge of key technical concepts of electricity to include: voltage, current, resistance, and power. EE 2213 places emphasis on electrical characteristics and limitations, and proper use of electrical laboratory equipment. EE 2114 is a continuation of EE 2104 Circuits I; which places emphasis on A.C. power analysis, three-phase circuits, magnetically coupled circuits and transformers, frequency response, passive and active filters, and circuit analysis using the Laplace transform. The Sophomore Laboratory is available to students during scheduled laboratory courses or by prior arrangement with faculty or staff.


The Sophomore laboratory contains twelve stations designed to accommodate two students per station. Each station is equipped with general lab equipment to included: a digital four channel oscilloscope, a function generator, a triple D.C. power supply, two handheld digital multimeters, one bench top digital multimeter, one soldering station, and a personal computer. Additionally there is a LRC meter used for demonstration and extra laboratory instruction.


Each personal computer contains Parallax Inx: Basic Stamp Editor v2.5.3 and Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 with supporting material. Students utilize the personal computers and software for developing a basic understanding of computer architecture and machine language. They also use the computers to program microcomputer-based robots (Bo-Bots®) to aid them in their design and testing of basic robots and computer applications.

Junior Laboratory - Stocker Center Room 314

The Junior laboratory is used for five courses total and three are required courses for the Electrical Engineering major; EE 1024 Introduction to Computer Engineering, EE 3223 Electromagnetics and Materials II, and EE 3343 Electronics I. EE 1024 develops the fundamentals of Boolean algebra and Sequential and Combinational logic. EE 3223 is a continuation of EE 3214 Electromagnetics and Materials I; which places emphasis on the application of field theory with respect to various branches of electrical engineering and with emphasis upon physical interpretation. EE 3343 develops an understanding of electronic devices including diodes, bi-polar transistors, and FETs. The course also includes computer-aided analysis and design. The Junior laboratory is available to students during scheduled laboratory courses or by prior arrangement with faculty or staff.
The Junior laboratory is also used for the laboratory course EE 3051 Basic Electrical Laboratory, which accompanies the electronics service course EE 3143 Basic Electrical Engineering II taken by non-electrical engineering majors. EE 3051 serves as an introduction into the operation of semiconductor devices, amplifier design, oscillators and digital circuits design. EE 3143 furthers the student’s knowledge gained in EE 3051 by investigating semiconductor devices, amplifiers and oscillator circuits, pulse and digital circuits, and performing small signal analysis.

The Junior laboratory contains fifteen laboratory stations designed to accommodate two students per station. Each station is equipped with general lab equipment to include: a dual channel oscilloscope, a triple D.C. power supply, three handheld digital multimeters, a function generator, a precision rms voltmeter, and a personal computer. A digital lab trainer is available at each station for students investigating digital circuits in the EE 1024 course. Additionally there are two curve tracers, two spectrum analyzers, and a LRC meter in the laboratory used for demonstration and extra laboratory instruction.
Each personal computer contains circuit simulation software (NI Multisim) with supporting material, microcontroller development system software (MPLABX – PIC Microcontroller IDE) with supporting material, data acquisition software, and MATLAB software with supporting material.
 

Microprocessor Laboratory - Stocker Center Room 306

The Microprocessors and Microcontrollers laboratory is primarily used for students taking EE 3954 Microprocessors and Microcontrollers. EE 3954 is a microcontroller architecture and applications course. The purpose of this lab is to provide microcontroller development systems and associated software such that students can design and perform experiments to aid in the understanding of microprocessor architecture and gain confidence in working with digital and microprocessor systems. The Microprocessors and Microcontrollers laboratory is available to students during scheduled laboratory courses or by prior arrangement with faculty or staff.
The Microprocessors and Microcontrollers laboratory contains twelve laboratory stations each designed to accommodate two students per station. Each station consists of a Microchip PIC™ based development system and a personal computer. Additionally there are two logic analyzers and a mixed mode analog/digital oscilloscope in the laboratory used for demonstration and extra laboratory instruction.
Each personal computer contains microcontroller development system software (MPLABX – PIC Microcontroller IDE) with supporting material, data acquisition software, and MATLAB software with supporting material.
 

Industrial Digital Control Laboratory - Stocker Center Room 310

The Industrial Digital Controls laboratory is primarily used for students taking EE 4913 Programmable Logic Controllers. EE4913 develops the student’s proficiency in the utilization of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Topics covered include programming, control architecture, and applications for PLC systems. The Industrial Digital Controls laboratory is available to students during scheduled laboratory courses or by prior arrangement with faculty or staff.

The Industrial Digital Controls laboratory contains twelve lab stations, each consisting of a CLICK PLC Test Rig and a personal computer with supporting material. Additionally there is a Fluid Process Rig in which students use as a final laboratory experiment.


Each personal computer contains Parallax: Basic Stamp Editor v2.5.3 with supporting material, CLICK Programming Software v2.00 with supporting material, and online access to CLICK Controllers technical and support information.

 

Senior Projects Laboratory - Stocker Center Room 312

The Senior laboratory is used for students taking EE 4953 Electrical and Computer Engineering Capstone Design I and EE 4963 Electrical and Computer Engineering Capstone Design II. EE 4953 provides students the opportunity to refine and demonstrate their ability in engineering design. Project teams are formed and major design team projects are developed emphasizing problem definition and specification. A preliminary design review is conducted and the course examines the systems approach to problem solving, economic analysis, and the elements of scheduling and planning.
EE 4963 is a continuation of the team design project which begins in EE 4953 with an emphasis on construction, pre-testing, and redesign; then ultimately final design assembly, testing, and analysis of testing results. Critical design and formal design reviews are conducted. EE 4963 also provides exposure to a variety of career options and examines skills necessary for a successful engineering career.
The Senior laboratory contains a variety of electronic test equipment, power supplies, and function generators. There are also various specialized pieces of equipment such as logic analyzers, spectrum analyzers, and precision sources and meters that are available to students working in the Senior laboratory. Projects are of a wide variety in the EE 4953 and EE 4963 courses, so the laboratory must be supplied with the most varied and versatile equipment possible. Most of the equipment in this facility comes as used equipment from the Sophomore, Junior, and Microprocessors and Microcontrollers laboratories. As new equipment is purchased to update and equip these laboratories, the older equipment is handed down to the Senior laboratory.