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Light Box Therapy

light therapy

 

Who should consider Light Box Therapy?

· Up to 3% of the population may experience symptoms of depression in winter, which is sometimes called Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).

· Some people who experience major depression find that their symptoms get worse in winter.

· If you have experienced SAD, on-going depression, insomnia, PMS, OCD, or jet lag, you may want to discuss this treatment option with your therapist.

 

How does this work?

1. You must be a client of CPS.

2. There is a sign up sheet at the front desk. Your therapist can make a referral for you to sign up for time.

3. Schedule about 15-30 minutes in the morning, preferably within an hour of waking.

4. Sit about 18 inches away from the light therapy box.

5. You do not have to look directly at the light box, but your eyes need to be open.

6. You can read or do other work while you sit.

7. You may schedule more than one time slot during the week. Consistency is key to seeing change.

Light Boxes do not emit UV-light and do not cause damage to eyes and skin.

 

Side effects

Although generally well tolerated and very safe, there are some side effects associated with using a light therapy box.

Eyestrain Fatigue

Headache Irritability

Insomnia Mania

If you experience side effects, you may want to reduce the time you spend in front of the light box or move farther away from the light. Light boxes may trigger mania in some individuals with bipolar disorder. You may want to discuss this with your doctor before you decide to use this treatment.