Total Economic Impact of SUED Teacher Education

Ohio University’s Patton College of Education is one of the top contributors with professional interns having a minimum economic impact of $12.9 million

Illustration by: Patrick Fahey

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OHIO’s Patton College and other state colleges of education contribute more than $90 million to state’s economy


Future teachers from Ohio’s public universities engage school children in every corner of the state and have a huge economic impact on the areas they serve, according to a new report from the State University Education Deans (SUED). And Ohio University’s Patton College of Education is one of the top contributors with professional interns having a minimum economic impact of $12.9 million.

For the 2016-17 academic year, teacher candidates at state universities were placed in 514 public school districts in all 88 Ohio counties, delivering an economic impact of $92.4 million.

The student teachers were represented in 84 towns, 195 suburban districts, 178 rural districts and 47 districts in cities.

Renée A. Middleton, SUED member and dean of The Patton College of Education, said the 2018 report demonstrates the breadth of the teacher candidates’ statewide footprint, their economic impact as they contribute to P-12 schools and the exceptional quality of the Ohio educational programs.

“Our teacher candidates are valuable resources for students and school districts throughout the state,” said Middleton. “They serve as co-teachers and mentors to students and provide a tangible economic benefit to the communities they serve. Their contributions cannot be understated and should not go unnoticed. In The Patton College of Education, candidates are prepared using a reimagined Clinical Model of Preparation. Within the last 10 years, the students’ professional internships have become longer, more rigorous, and intensive thanks to the contributions of our teachers in today’s public schools.”

The State University Education Deans is an association of deans from Ohio’s 13 public colleges of education. Its mission is to ensure high-quality candidates that are prepared for employment in schools, agencies and other professional settings.

The association works with the Ohio Department of Education, the Ohio Department of Higher Education, Ohio’s private teacher preparation institutions, P–12 school districts and other educational entities, including the Ohio Legislature.

“Our educational system is at its best when all available resources are working toward a common goal of impacting P-12 student learning and preparing the next generation of teachers. Together, we can provide a top-notch educational experience for all Ohio learners,” said Middleton.

The impact by candidates from the state universities include:

  • Bowling Green State University, $14.4 million
  • Ohio State University, $13.4 million
  • Ohio University, $12.9 million
  • Miami University, $12.4 million
  • Kent State University, $9 million
  • University of Cincinnati, $7.6 million
  • Wright State University, $5.6 million
  • Cleveland State University, $5.1 million
  • Youngstown State University, $4 million
  • University of Toledo, $3.5 million
  • University of Akron, $3.1 million
  • Shawnee State University, $1.3 million
  • Central State University, $300,000