Ohio University

Sociology Undergraduate Courses

<h2>SOC 1000 - Introduction to Sociology</h2><p>Nature of human society and factors affecting its development. Fundamental concepts of sociology: culture, personality, socialization, social organization, groups, institutions. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2SS</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2000 - Contemporary Social Problems</h2><p>This course examines the claims-making process through which journalists, specialists, politicians, and agents of other media forms identify and reify social problems in everyday life. Special attention is paid to the ways in which claims-makers and social movement architects socially construct arguments by drawing on data sources and using strategic rhetorical styles to influence audiences. The causes and consequences of these definitional processes are examined using multiple social problems.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000 or (Soph or Jr or Sr)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2SS</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2040 - Animals and Human Society</h2><p>Students will learn about relationships between humans and animals historically and cross-culturally, how the meanings attached to animals structure human-animal and animal-human interactions within several institutions, and how these meanings work to perpetuate hierachical human relationships such as racism and sexism. Several of the major philosophical positions regarding animal-human relations will be examined critically.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2100 - Introduction to Social Psychology</h2><p>Patterning of individual behavior from social interactions. Analysis of individual-group relationships in various social settings. Current theory and research in social psychology. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2110 - Collective Behavior</h2><p>Examines the emergence and significance of collective behavior in its many forms. Topics may include but are not limited to behavior in crowds; behavior in panics, disasters, fads and fashions, protests, and riots; rumor and communication processes; and the impact of collective behavior on society. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2200 - Introduction to the Family</h2><p>Emphasis on American family and how it has been changing. Topics include interaction within family, family in relation to other institutions, mate selection, marriage and its alternatives, family disorganization, and future of American family. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2300 - Social Inequalities and Social Change</h2><p>This course is a comprehensive survey of the sources, meaning, and consequences of social inequality in its multiple forms including age, class, gender, poverty/wealth, race/ethnicity, sexuality, and spatial dimensions. The course connects these forms to social change processes that can be both a source of or solution to inequality. Whether it is collective action, culture, development, the environment, globalization, population, social institutions, or social structure, social change has many sources, providing an arena for social inequality to play out and intersect in its various forms. Having taken this course, students will have received breadth in the coverage of social inequality and social change, enabling critical analysis of its dynamics and presence in their everyday lives and the larger society. Using a social injustice framework and an informed sociological imagination, the course is intended to prepare students for additional study in more focused and advanced topics in inequality.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2310 - Sociology of Health and Health Care</h2><p>Examination of social definitions of health and disease, distributions of health and disease, and health care delivery. Particular attention devoted to medical education, various health care delivery systems, and contemporary social issues in medicine.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2330 - Sociology of Sport</h2><p>A sociological examination of sport in the United States and its social organization as a major American institution. The course will examine the nature of sport, its social functions, and attempt to situate it in the wider contemporary and historical context of our society. Focus on topics such as: sport and socialization, violence/deviance in sport, sport and academic institutions, gender and race in sport,and the business of sport. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2600 - Criminal Justice</h2><p>This course examines the structures and decision processes of agencies that deal with crime and people involved in justice process, including criminal justice personnel, people apprehended and convicted of crimes, and victims of crimes. An emphasis is placed on how practice is based on politically derived public policies, and how sociology can be used to analyze the practice of these agencies. Topics include but not limited to criminal law, policing, court systems, sentencing, and corrections.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2610 - Deviant Behavior</h2><p>This course examines theory and research concerning the social processes through which behaviors and statuses come to be defined as deviant, individuals become identified as deviants, and social control practices are directed toward perceived deviants. Case studies of specific categories of deviant behavior, including but not limited to alcohol abuse criminality, drug addiction, and mental disorders, are examined. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2900 - Special Topics in Sociology</h2><p>Specific course content will vary with offering.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 15</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 2920X - Exploring Professions and Careers in Sociology-Criminology</h2><p>This two credit-hour practicum is designed to give sophomore standing sociology-criminology students an early start on the process of exploring careers in a broad array of fields relevant to their major. The course is designed to give students the opportunity to inventory marketable skills, participate in experiential learning, and explore a career path of interest.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 2</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> practicum</p>
<h2>SOC 2970T - Honors Tutorial in Sociology</h2><p>Honors tutorial on topics in Sociology for first year students. Topics vary.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>SOC 2971T - Sociology Honors Tutorial</h2><p>Honors tutorial on topics in Sociology for second year students. Topics vary.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>SOC 2980T - Honors Tutorial in Sociology</h2><p>Honors tutorial on topics in Sociology for first year students. Topics vary.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>SOC 2981T - Honors Tutorial in Sociology</h2><p>Honors tutorial on topics in Sociology for second year students. Topics vary.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>SOC 3000 - Development of Sociological Theory</h2><p>This course offers an introduction to sociological theory. Students will examine the historical roots of sociological theory and understand major theoretical paradigms with an emphasis on social and intellectual contexts, conceptual frameworks and methods, and contributions to contemporary social analysis.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3090 - Sociology of Appalachia</h2><p>Appalachia, a region examined by sociologists for more than 100 years, continues to be a subject of study for academics seeking to demystify the region and foster positive change for its people and the land. The politics of the region, the persistence of poverty, and the development and sustainability of the economy, environment, and society are main themes in Appalachian studies that the course explores from a sociological perspective. Additional topics relevant to the sociology of Appalachia may include but are not limited to social movements and social media, transitional economies, and the dynamics of Appalachian culture and identity.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3150 - Social Identities</h2><p>Identity is a very complex concept that has personal, social, political, and cultural dimensions. This course explores the social construction of identity at each of these levels of interaction. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3270 - Sociology of Education</h2><p>School as social institution in relation to community and development of child; comparative systems of education; issues of access and inequality in delivery of educational services.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3290 - Race and Ethnic Relations</h2><p>Racial and ethnic problems in society; causes and consequences of prejudice and discrimination. Focus on differences and patterns of inequality in the United States as well as other societies.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3300 - Sociology of Poverty</h2><p>Critically examines how poverty is defined and measured, the competing theoretical perspectives and debates on poverty, the implications of research on the poor, the numerous forms of poverty and its consequences, and strategies and policy solutions for fighting poverty. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3310 - Class and Inequality</h2><p>Causes and consequences of class and social inequality in selected societies. Critical examination of ideologies that claim to justify inequality. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3350 - Economic Sociology</h2><p>This course examines the social structural, cultural, and political foundations of market exchange, the production of goods and services in the formal and informal economies, and consumption. A variety of theoretical approaches drawn from the political economy, social behavioral, sociology of culture, and social network traditions in sociology will be used to explore non-economic dimensions of economic structure and action.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3400 - Population and Society</h2><p>This course examines the social and cultural determinations and consequences of changes in fertility, mortality, and migration. Current and historical national and international population policies and programs are also examined, incorporating sources of demographic data used in population analysis. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3500 - Elementary Research Techniques</h2><p>An introduction to the techniques employed by social scientists to identify research problems, gather data, analyze data, and reach conclusions about their research ideas. Topics include how to identify a research problem, ways to develop data gathering procedures, techniques of gathering data, ways to summarize data, and ways to analyze data. The overall goal is to provide the tools to be able to design and carry out a research project. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000 and (404 or 3000) and (COMS 3520 or ECON 3810 or MATH 2500 or PSY 2110 or QBA 2010)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3520 - Field Studies in Sociology</h2><p>Planning, execution, and writeup of empirical study, utilizing skills developed in 3500. Limited class meetings, conferences with instructor, research report.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 3500</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3560J - Writing in Sociology & Anthropology</h2><p>Junior level composition course for Sociology and Anthropology majors and students in related fields. Combines writing instruction with consideration of substantive social science topics. Students try various styles of social science writing (book reviews; grant proposals; field notes; interviews; etc.). Prerequisites: (JR OR SR) & 13 HRS SOC/ANT </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in (ANTH or SOC)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 1J</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>SOC 3600 - Criminology</h2><p>This course examines theories and research in criminal behavior and societal reaction to crime and deviance. It explores the what different methodological approaches and data sources inform us about the distribution of crime, and how social scientific understanding of crime is shaped by cultural, economic, organizational, social, and political forces. Consideration of the ethical responsibilities of criminology are also considered. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 2600</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3630 - Juvenile Delinquency</h2><p>This course examines the social forces that shape the social control of children and adolescents and produce juvenile delinquency. Topics include but are not limited to: the history and social construction of youth and adolescence in the United States, the history of the juvenile justice system, the age-crime relationship, the empirically established predictors of behavior problems and youth crime, and a survey of juvenile justice programs and policies. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 2600</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3640 - Police and Society</h2><p>Examines the nature and development of policing in the United States from a sociological perspective. Students are introduced to a broad range of topics including police decision making, procedural law, police culture, types of policing, police-minority relations, and police misconduct. Examines the changing role of police in society and the potential consequences these changes have for the development of social policy. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 2600</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3650 - Sociology of Mental Illness</h2><p>Study of social and cultural foundations of mental illness, including review of historic and contemporary definitions of madness and treatment of mental illness. Distribution of mental illness in population and social factors related thereto. Nature of commitment process and legal, moral, and social implications of commitment. Examination of legal processes pertaining to criminal insanity. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3660 - Punishment and Society</h2><p>This course is a survey of the theory, history, operation, and problems of punishment. It explores the organization and effectiveness of penal institutions, the causes and impacts of mass incarceration, the politics of punishment, and abolition movements. Topics studied include but are not limited to halfway houses, juvenile institutions, parole, prisons, privatization, and alternatives to punishment.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 2600</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3670 - Corporate and Governmental Crime</h2><p>Examination of the nature, extent, and distribution of corporate, governmental, and other forms of white-collar crime. Practical issues of conducting research in these areas and the application of theory to specific cases. Particular instances of corporate and governmental crime. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 2600</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3680X - Immigration and Crime</h2><p>This course will provide students with the basic knowledge about how immigration and crime intersect. The students will first learn the fundamentals of immigration, to include the basic history of immigration in the United States, the push and pull factors that bring immigrants to the United States, and contemporary issues relating to modern-day immigrants. The course will then cover the ways in which immigrants come in contact with the criminal justice system in this country.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> SOC 1000 and 6 hours in Sociology</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3720 - Sociology of Masculinity</h2><p>This course examines developments in the study of men and masculinity. The course focuses on the construction of masculinity in sports, family, work, and other social relationships. The effects of masculine identity on people and social institutions will be a primary focus of the course. The course also explores how masculinity is affected by and affects racial, occupational, physical ability, and sexual identities.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 3930 - Readings in Sociology</h2><p>Independent directed readings designed to expand student's understanding in selected area of interest.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Permission required</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 independent study</p>
<h2>SOC 3970T - Sociology Honors Tutorial</h2><p>Honors tutorial on topics in Sociology for third year students. Topics vary.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>SOC 3980T - Sociology Honors Tutorial</h2><p>Honors tutorial on topics in Sociology for third year students. Topics vary.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>SOC 4000 - Emergent Topics in Sociological Theory</h2><p>This advanced theory course offers an in-depth examination of current issues in sociological theory. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including (1000 and (404 or 3000))</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4130 - Media and Society</h2><p>The proliferation of new media/technology and its impact upon social life; the dramatic impact of an intensely global visual culture upon social life; tensions in race, gender, and sexuality in representation; the resurgence and cultural functions of the real in box office documentary and reality television; ideological debates about media effects and violence; the limits of representation (images of death, torture, war, and genocide) and the end(s) of the social.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4140 - Contemporary Social Movements</h2><p>Examines the meaning of social movements and contentious politics and their significance for producing social change in contemporary world societies. Using case studies of typical movements, the course emphasizes both radical and reform movements and their various dynamics and components including emergence and participation, organization, culture, identity, tactical repertoires, and outcomes among others. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4160 - Society and the Individual</h2><p>An advanced examination of selected topics in sociological social psychology with emphasis on current theory and research.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4190 - Group Processes</h2><p>This course introduces a range of theories of group processes, discusses research applications to social groups, and encourages students to apply these theories to contemporary groups. Communication patterns, social networks, social roles, status processes, and solidarity are among topics covered. Current research literature is stressed.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4210 - Comparative Studies of Family</h2><p>The institution of marriage and family will be examined and analyzed with regard to families from different cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. Special emphasis on the significance of social and cultural determinants of family life in the United States. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4220 - The American Family System</h2><p>Development of the family system throughout history with an emphasis on how changing patterns and conditions led to the formation of the American family. Problems and challenges, both at the micro and macro levels, faced by the American family today are also examined. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4240 - Urban Sociology</h2><p>Examines the social and cultural character of cities and how urban spaces shape, and are shaped by, social life. Draws on competing social theories of urban life to explore factors that have influenced the historical development of cities. Examines processes of industrialization, urbanization, and suburbanization. Other topics include ethnic segregation and the spatial patterning of inequality, uses of urban space, the social and moral order of the neighborhood, urban subcultures, urban imagery and symbolism, gentrification, and the impact of globalization on urban life.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4280 - Sociology of Religion</h2><p>Interrelationship between religious institution and social structure from comparative perspective and with particular reference to American society.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4300 - Sociology of Organization</h2><p>This course concentrates on the structure and process of formal organizations. We study various organizational forms, including bureaucracies and nonprofits, in detail. We will also explore the major theoretical perspectives for understanding how organizations function. The course will also explore the impact of organizations on individual identity, autonomy, and power. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4320 - Political Sociology</h2><p>This course examines authority and power relationships in both the state and civil society that influence structure and agency within key societal institutions at all levels, from the local to the global. A variety of class, historical-institutional, organizational, cultural, and social network perspectives are used to explore how power relationships develop, are institutionalized, and are challenged. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4330 - Sociology of Work</h2><p>This course scrutinizes the ways women and men work in the United States and how the work we do affects our lives. Using a sociological perspective, we will critically examine the structure of work, major economic changes, and concerns of workers such as earnings, promotions, unemployment and the balance between work and family. In an effort to understand many of the inequalities related to work, we will challenge both the structure of our society as well as many of our commonly held unquestioned beliefs. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4500 - Data Analysis</h2><p>This course develops the ability to analyze research data in the social sciences. The linkages among measurement, statistics, and interpretation of results in social research will be explored. Unscheduled computer laboratory commitment is required.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including (1000 and 3500)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4620 - Sociology of the Courts</h2><p>This course is designed to introduce students to a sociological perspective on the importance and impact of the court system in American society. We will examine the court's structural and cultural features as well as how court officials create and move cases through to various institutional outcomes.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4640 - Law in Societies</h2><p>Explores the fundamental roles that law plays in organizing contemporary social life. Considers various ways of understanding law's complex presence: how law shapes and enables routine social interaction, how law constructs differences among people and their actions, how law mediates and enforces power relationships, and how law matters for the kind of societies we have. Our inquiries will examine official legal institutions and actors, but the class will emphasize how law works as a complex array of norms, symbols, discourses, and practices that infuse and shape all aspects of social life, from everyday social interaction to social movements and official legal institutions and actors. The course draws from the U.S. experience as well as historical, international, and transnational perspectives. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4650 - Social Change</h2><p>Dynamics and processes by which social change takes place; major theories of change; industrialization and modernization; social evolution and revolution; planned change; social impact of change. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4670 - Violence Against Women</h2><p>Examines related forms of violence where women are the predominant victims, with a major emphasis on forcible rape and woman physical abuse. Other forms of violence against women may be included, such as stalking, rape in marriage, incest and other related subjects. The place of masculinities, the development of a rape culture, and the role of the media, including pornography, will be examined. The course will include both theoretical and empirical findings and developments. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4680 - Crimes Against Humanity: Confronting and Responding to Mass Atrocity and Genocide</h2><p>How social scientists, criminologists, and other intellectuals have sought to make sense of genocide and mass atrocity; the challenge of mass violence for criminology and law; and responses to mass atrocity by local, national and transnational actors.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4690 - Crime, Risk, and Governance</h2><p>Upper-level undergraduate seminar designed to survey an emergent area of inquiry, the sociology of risk, in its multiple and varied forms, including the rise of world "risk society," actuarialism, governmentatilty, and edgework. Course focuses upon how individuals render comprehensible a world of risk; how these perceptions and experiences are shaping and shaped by social life; and how we construct justice and state governance in such contexts.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4700 - Sociology of Gender</h2><p>This course explores the social and cultural construction of gender as a fundamental basis of social relations and institutions and the micro and macro narratives we tell about those interpersonal relations and institutions. Focus includes sociological theories of gender, and an examination of gender in areas such as sexuality, identity, the body, education, marriage, family, violence, health, paid and unpaid work, popular culture, politics, and the history of the discipline itself.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4710 - Gender and Justice</h2><p>Explores how the interpretation and application of criminal law reflects assumptions about men's and women's natures, appropriate roles, and positions in society. Readings examine changes and stability in the prosecution of violence against women; the prosecution, sentencing, and correction of women offenders; women's and men's access to the profession of law and other legal positions; and conceptions of justice. Readings highlight how race, class, and gender intersect and how structure and interpersonal interaction contribute to observed outcomes. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4810 - Environmental Sociology</h2><p>Examines the interaction between social systems and the natural ecosystems in which they reside. It considers the predominant cultural, demographic, economic, geographic, political, and social factors that modify and shape the environment and the human ecological footprint. Emphasis is on the prospects for the emergence of sustainable societies and links between environmental issues and conflict, development, globalization, inequality, social change, and social movements among others. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in SOC including 1000</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4900 - GRADUATE PROSEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY</h2><p>The proseminar is required for incoming sociology graduate students. It is designed to advance students' enthusiasm and commitment to sociology as an intellectual endeavor and as a profession. The course will also help graduate students acclimate to the rigorous requirements and culture of graduate school.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 15</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 lecture</p>
<h2>SOC 4910 - Internship in Sociology & Criminology</h2><p>Provides internship experience for students majoring in sociology, criminology/sociology, and sociology-prelaw. Students will have the opportunity to apply social science knowledge in working with law, business, criminal justice, non-profit, social service, and other organizations. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Permission required and SOC 3500 and sociology major and Sr only</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3 - 9</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 6.0 internship</p>
<h2>SOC 4940 - Research Problems in Sociology</h2><p>Individual research in specific problem areas in which student has demonstrated ability and interest.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Permission required and 15 hours in SOC including (404 or 3000) and 3500</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 6</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 research</p>
<h2>SOC 4940H - Honors Thesis in Sociology</h2><p>Designed individually for students pursuing departmental honors. The work is undertaken under the supervision of a faculty member and may extend for up to one academic year. The student is expected to produce a thesis from the work.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Permission required</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 research</p>
<h2>SOC 4950 - Sociology Capstone</h2><p>Capstone course in sociology.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 18 Hours in SOC including 3000 and 3500 and Sr only</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>SOC 4970T - Sociology Tutorial</h2><p>Honors tutorial thesis course for seniors.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>SOC 4980T - Sociology Tutorial</h2><p>Honors tutorial thesis course for seniors</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 tutorial</p>