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College of Arts & Sciences

Political Science Undergraduate Courses

  • POLS 1010 - Politics in the United States

    Examines the role of citizenship, participation, and government in the context of American domestic politics.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 1500 - Themes in Global Politics

    Each class has anchoring theme or set of themes related to global politics, such as, but not limited to, norms, justice, power, conflict and cooperation, globalization and development.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 1600 - Engaging Politics

    Course begins by giving students an introduction to the ways politics has been historically understood, and continues to discuss the ways it is understood in the discipline of political science. As the course continues, students will spend significant time exploring alternative understandings of politics in terms of current political events, parties, movements, revolutions and struggles in the U.S. and globally.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 2000 - American Politics, Policy, and Administration

    Introduction to American politics, policy, and administration. Investigates how public policies are formulated and implemented. Under conventional view of the politics/administration dichotomy, political factors such as political party and public opinion significantly dominate the entire phase of policy formulation. Governmental bureaucracies are supposed to faithfully implement public policies that political decision makers enact. During recent decades, governmental bureaucracies have been more heavily involved in policy formulation as well as policy implementation. Surveys the historical development from a perspective of democracy and bureaucracy. Asked to think about the ideal relationship among politics, policy, and administration.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 2200 - The Politics of Law

    Introduces the study of law as a political process with special emphasis on courts, legal ideologies, violence, and the mobilization of rights claims in social and political conflict.

    Requisites: One 1000-level POLS course

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 2300 - Democracies and Dictatorships Around the World

    Introduction to dynamics, structures, and comparison of contemporary political systems and processes.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 2500 - International Relations

    Introduction to key themes and approaches in the study of international relations. Assesses the major forces and constraints affecting state and non-state actors in the international system.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 2700 - Introduction to Political Theory

    Introduces a range of the canonical works in the western tradition of political thought. Uses the contemporary context of political struggles for equality, community, and justice as a lens through which to assess the problems and possibilities of this work.

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 2900 - Special Topics in Political Science

    Specific course content will vary with offering.

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 2970T - Political Science Non-Thesis Tutorial First Year

    Honors tutorial on topics in political science.

    Requisites: HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 tutorial

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 2971T - Political Science Non-Thesis Tutorial

    Honors tutorial on topics in political science.

    Requisites: HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 tutorial

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 2980T - Political Science Non-Thesis Tutorial

    Honors tutorial on topics in political science.

    Requisites: HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 tutorial

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 2981T - Political Science Non-Thesis Tutorial

    Honors tutorial on topics in political science.

    Requisites: HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 tutorial

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 3040 - State Politics

    Comparative analysis of state political systems. Emphasis on structure and process of policy making of states within federal context.

    Requisites: POLS 1010 or 2000

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 3050J - Writing on Political Science Topics

    Writing course for political science majors. Focuses on studying and producing clear and persuasive writing about political issues.

    Requisites: 12 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 1J

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 3060 - Politics of Appalachia

    Introduction to Appalachia, its political patterns, and political problems such as politics of poverty and powerlessness. Includes examination of responses to these problems by various levels of government--national, regional, state, and local.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 3200 - Urban Politics

    Examines urban politics and the politics of urbanization with an emphasis on urban problems, globalization, the structure and functions of municipalities and municipal governments, urban growth and development, and alternative urban arrangements.

    Requisites: 6 hours in POLS and Soph or higher

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 3520 - International Peace

    Studies conflict management and peace in both international and civil conflicts. Addresses historical and current cases involving peaceful settlement of conflicts; the assumptions, norms, and rules informing the theory and practice of international mediation, conflict management, and the achievement of international peace; and the emerging role of both inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations in these areas. Combines concerns for formal diplomatic and institutional approaches with informal diplomacy and reconciliation initiatives. Focuses on analyzing the conditions that allow for peace rather than preparing prescriptive recipes for it.

    Requisites: POLS 1500 or 2500

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 3540 - Different Approaches to American Foreign Policy

    Analysis of different approaches and theories used for the explanation of American foreign policy. Comparison of different sets of arguments in support of various American foreign policies.

    Requisites: POLS 2500

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 3700 - The Enlightenment and its Critics

    The western enlightenment still shapes the parameters of much of what we take for granted about political life today. Beginning with the work of Immanuel Kant and John Locke as thinkers central to the western enlightenment, critically examines the relationships between power and knowledge, individual freedom and social and political order, reason and religion, progress and pluralism. Critical examinations draw from work ranging from early conservative responses to the enlightenment, to Marxist, psychoanalytic, existentialist, feminist and postcolonial work.

    Requisites: POLS 2700

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 3750 - Politics and Film

    For many political scientists and theorists, politics involves an ongoing conversation over the meaning and distribution of power in our lives. A major part of the discussions and debates are the various forms of entertainment that many times attempt to represent the world around us through film, music, and other media. Examines the diverse ways that politics, power, and film intersect and co-constitute one another. Investigates how race, sex, class, gender and other identity formations are represented in film, attempting to discern how images either perpetuate or resist dominant societal norms.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 3970T - Political Science Non-Thesis Tutorial

    Honors tutorial on topics in political science.

    Requisites: HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 tutorial

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 3980T - Political Science Non-Thesis Tutorial

    Honors tutorial on topics in political science.

    Requisites: HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 tutorial

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4010 - American Constitutional Law

    Study of the politics of American constitutional law through the study of Supreme Court cases and other public documents.

    Requisites: POLS 2200

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4015 - Constitutional Politics

    The United States Constitution confers authority on the various branches of government in order to empower the federal government. At the same time, the Constitution is designed to restrain public officials in their exercise of institutional power to prevent abuse of government power. In Madisonian theory, the separation of powers system works when one branch challenges another in its exercise of power. Those who challenge another may be motivated by politics or partisanship, but they couch their challenge in constitutional language. Hence 'constitutional politics' serves as conflict that is healthy for the American constitutional order. The system is in trouble when public officials fail to engage in conflict; if one branch asserts excessive power and another branch does not challenge it, then the system runs into the danger of tyranny, which James Madison defined as the accumulation of powers in one branch. Course examines historic and recent constitutional issues to assess whether each branch has lived up to its responsibility of checking the others. If any branch has been remiss, we will explore why.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4040 - Civil Liberties

    A problem-based approach to U.S. civil liberties law.

    Requisites: POLS 2200

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4050 - American Political Parties

    Examines the growth, development, and operation of political parties in the United States.

    Requisites: 12 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4060 - Elections and Campaigns

    Examines the operation of political campaigns in the context of American elections.

    Requisites: 6 hours in POLS and Soph or higher

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4062 - American Voting Behavior

    Many studies of American elections are premised on the actions of individual voters (as well as potential voters and non-voters). Introduces the classics in the field of voting behavior research, along with recent studies that attempt to stand on the shoulders of these earlier works. Focuses on these two primary questions: a) why do people vote; b) how do they decide for whom to vote? One guiding concern is the issue as to whether voting behavior is self-interested or whether it reflects societal norms. Analyzes patterns of voting behavior in order to better assess American democracy and the manner in which it operates.

    Requisites: POLS 1010 and 2000

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4065 - Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Protest

    Examines the nature and content of individual and mass political opinion and behavior with an emphasis on explanations of opinion changes, the connection between political opinion and political participation and protest activities, and the consequences of various forms of political behavior for government and democracy.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4067 - Women and Politics

    Examines the role of gender in shaping American political life, with an emphasis on the empirical study of gender in politics.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS or 1010 or 2000

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4070 - Strategic Decision-Making

    Using a wide range of cases -- the Cold War, resource depletion, political campaigns, and legislative politics -- this course will engage students in the construction and analysis of strategic interaction. Students will assess the public value of private and official actions and learn to discover Nash Equilibrium and Subgame-Perfect Equilibrium.

    Requisites: (Jr or Sr) and Warning: No credit for both this course and the following (always deduct credit for first course taken): ECON 3020

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4100 - Public Policy Analysis

    Examines stages of policy process, including policy formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Also discusses development and methods of policy analysis.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4145 - Policy Implementation and Evaluation

    Examines what factors affect the performance of public programs and organizations. Surveys the processes of policy formulation and implementation within the context of politics. Analyzes governmental interventions in terms of efficiency, effectiveness, and responsiveness. Investigates how statistical methods can be applied to evaluations of governmental interventions. Demonstrates how to operationalize various components of public programs in order to conduct statistical analysis.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS including 2000

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4150 - The American Presidency

    Analysis of office of national chief executive and its place in American political system. Attention given to constitutional status and powers, functional development, and interrelationship of person and office.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS including (2000 or 2200)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4151 - Politics of Taxation

    This course examines sound principles of taxation in the national, state, and local governments. Taxation has also been used as a tool of fiscal policy primarily by the national government. This course will examine how budget and tax policies affect and are affected by the national economy and politics. This course also introduces various fiscal issues such as cost-benefit analysis, intergovernmental fiscal relations, and debt management. Under the quarter system, POLS 490/590 B: Politics of Taxation has been offered for the past several years. This semester course is equivalent to the quarter course.

    Requisites: (POLS 1010 or 1600) and Soph or above

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4155 - The White House: Management and Administration

    The White House is the center of American public administration. Introduces the White House as a ''mini-bureaucracy'' at the hub of the national government, to include the Executive Office of the President, the White House Office, and the far reaching extensions of presidential bureaucratic power as embodied in such operations as presidential travel. Explores the role of staff within the White House. Focuses on the questions: a) how does the White House work; b) what makes it different from other bureaucracies in the American system of government?

    Requisites: (POLS 1010 or 1600) and Soph or above

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4160 - Legislative Processes

    Explores legislative process and policy, primarily at the national and state levels. Examines influence of interest groups, the media, constituencies, political parties, executive and judicial branches, and organizational structure of legislatures on legislative outcomes.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS including (2000 or 2200)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4180 - Interest Groups in American Politics

    Organization and tactics of pressure groups and their impact on the policy-making process.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4190 - Gay and Lesbian Politics

    Analysis of gay and lesbian political issues such as same-sex marriage, military inclusion, non-discrimination, and hate crimes.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4210 - The Politics of Law and Sexuality

    An exploration of the regulation of sexuality in the U.S. from legal and theoretical perspectives. Cases and other materials will address a variety of issues including the right to privacy, pornography, the right to marry, and gays in the military.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4230 - Political Leadership

    Examines the role of leadership in democratic society, which an emphasis on the relationship between leaders and their constituencies, as well as the consequences of leadership decisions.

    Requisites: (POLS 1010 or 1600) and Soph or above

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4240 - American Federalism and Public Policy

    Provides an in-depth historical, political, and administrative examination of the American intergovernmental arena.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4250 - Environmental and Natural Resources Politics and Policy

    Examines the institutional context and political dynamics of environmental policy-making in the United States. Topics include public support for environmental protection; the role of science in the policy process; the major actors and avenues of influence; and current policy issues.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4260 - Politics of the Contemporary Environmental Movement

    Analysis of the U.S. modern environmental movement including the characteristics and contributions of the mainstream; radical environmentalists' tactics and philosophies; grassroots environmentalism, and the role of women in environmental activism, and environmental racism and justice, and the role of people of color in the environmental movement.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4270 - Theories of American Foreign Policy

    Exploration of different theoretical approaches used for the analysis of American foreign policies from past to present. Emphasis on explaining American foreign policy changes with the use of theories from international relations.

    Requisites: 6 hours in POLS and POLS 2500 recommended

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4280 - Politics and Science in the United States

    Considers the intersection of science, politics, and political science in terms of substantive policy and methodology. Investigates how scientists become involved in political decisions, and how scientific information is used in public policy making. Analyzes contemporary issues where science and politics meet.

    Requisites: Sr and (POLS 1010 or 2000) and 3 hours Tier II Natural Sciences

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4300 - Politics in Western Europe

    Government and politics in several west European nations.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2SS

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4310 - Politics in Eastern Europe

    Discussion of recent political shifts in eastern Europe, from communism through current revolutions/transitions. Special focus on construction of democratic institutions, economics reforms, post-communist justice, and ethnic politics.

    Requisites: POLS 1500 or POLS 2300 or POLS 2500 or permission required

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4340 - Government and Politics of Latin America

    Political systems of Latin America. Emphasis on power relationships and political obstacles to change in contemporary Latin America.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS including 2300

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4360 - Government and Politics of Brazil

    Surveys the politics and political institutions of Brazil. Includes an examination of the major historical developments in Brazilian politics; the country's governmental structure and political processes; the challenges and opportunities facing today's Brazil.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4370 - Government and Politics in Britain

    A study of the major political processes, personalities, and institutions of British government, including key foreign policy issues.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS including 2300

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4380 - Government and Politics in Germany

    Major political processes, personalities, and institutions of contemporary West Germany, including key foreign policy issues

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS including 2300

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4390 - Government and Politics in France

    Major political processes, personalities, ideas, and institutions of modern France.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS including 2300

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4400 - The Politics of Developing Areas

    Major theories and problems of political, sociocultural, and economic development in new states of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, with special emphasis on heritage of colonialism, struggle for independence, and political adjustments to rapid social and technological change.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr or Permission Required

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 2CP

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4410 - African Politics

    Development and structure of modern African states with emphasis on political processes in tropical Africa.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr or Permission Required

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4415 - Religion and Global Politics

    Examines the impact of religious values, beliefs, and organized faith groups on global politics. Considers how religious laypeople and leaders impact political processes in domestic politics and international relations, as well as how faith communities compete and coexist in the political sphere. Approach will be both contemporary and historical, as well as comparative. Cases might include the impact of religion on global and national law, the role of religious activists in governmental and non-governmental organizations, the relationship between individual and collective religious values and national political outcomes, and the impact of secularism on politics. Focus will be global, although U.S. cases may be considered in comparative perspective.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4420 - Middle East Politics

    Examination of the major issues and dilemmas in contemporary Middle Eastern politics, including: the Arab-Israeli conflict, the role of religion and nationalism, the status of women, and efforts at development and democratization.

    Requisites: POLS 2300 or 2500

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4440 - East Asia in World Politics

    Examines the evolution of East Asia in world politics in the postwar era, including both the historical antecedents and alternative theoretical perspectives, as well as a variety of contemporary, political, economic, and security issues related to this region.

    Requisites: POLS 2300 or 2500

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4450 - Government and Politics of Japan

    Political institutions and processes of Japan with emphasis on developments since 1945.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS or Asian History

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4460 - Government and Politics of China

    Political institutions and processes and major political developments in China, with emphasis on recent events.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS or Asian History

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4465 - Gandhi and King: Nonviolence as Philosophy and Strategy

    This course provides a view of nonviolence as an end and personal style, although emphasis is placed on nonviolence as a means of political and social resistance to oppression. This course investigates the lives and work of Mohandas K. Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. as the point of entry for giving students an opportunity to integrate and apply the theories and practice of nonviolence or other alternative paradigms into real-life conflict situations, including their own life experiences. An interdisciplinary analysis of nonviolence is employed.

    Requisites: (POLS 1600 or 6 hours in POLS) and Sr

    Credits: 3

    General Education Code: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4470 - Government and Politics of Southeast Asia

    Traditional governments in southeast Asia, Western colonialism, rise of nationalism, achievement of independence.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in HIST or 9 hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4480 - Comparative Public Policy

    Examines and compares characteristics of public policy in various national political settings. Students: (1) discover more about how public policies in the United States differ from other countries; (2) think about why this is the case; (3) focus on how policies shape the political realm; and (4) develop the skills to become effective policy analysts.

    Requisites: 6 hours in POLS or (Jr or Sr)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4490 - Nationalism/Ethnic Conflict

    Examines the nature of nationalism and its sources. Considers the nature of state boundaries and the political contention that can lead to violence based on national identity. Explores the means to resolve or prevent such conflicts.

    Requisites: POLS 1500 or POLS 2300 or POLS 2500 or permission required

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4495 - The Challenges of Democratization

    Focuses on the process of democratization in historical and comparative perspective. Topics include historical and contemporary debates over the meaning of democracy and how to qualitatively and quantitatively "measure" democracy; the major theories of democratization, democratic transition, and consolidation; trends in authoritarian efforts to limit or prevent democratization; the theory and practice of institutional design in new democracies; case studies of successful and failed democratization.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr or Permission Required

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4497 - Capitalism and Democracy

    Examines the interaction between the economy and politics in a comparative context focusing on domestic issues and linkages, which in political science is called comparative political economy. Today most economies have a significant share organized along market capitalist lines, and these market capitalist economies are heavily shaped by the regime type whether democratic or non-democratic and variations within each sub-type, so comparative political economy is about capitalism and democracy or the lack thereof. Analysis takes a theoretical approach that emphasizes competing frameworks including liberalism, Marxism, and neo-mercantilism. Issues examined include welfare state politics, varieties of capitalism, market failure and the state, embedded capitalism, the role of business among oth

    Requisites: 6 hours in POLS or (Jr or Sr)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4505H - Honors Seminar

    Seminar on selected topics in political science and preparation and research for writing an honors thesis.

    Requisites: Permission required and POLS major

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4506H - Honors Thesis in Political Science

    Research, writing, and preparing an honors thesis.

    Requisites: POLS 4505H

    Credits: 1 - 6

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 seminar

    Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4550 - International Law

    Studies the contribution of international law to order, power, and justice in international politics. Explores historical origins and current problems in the field, with attention to classic debates over the sources, purposes, and interests associated with international law. Places formal aspects of law (centered on the United Nations and the International Court of Justice) within the wider context of global governance, including the influence of customary international law and the work of non-governmental organizations. Discussions and readings include critical perspectives on international law as a vehicle of power in a world of inequality.

    Requisites: 6 hours in POLS (POLS 2500 recommended)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4555 - Transitional Justice

    Focused study of the emerging field of transitional justice, from war crimes tribunals and truth commissions to official apologies and reparations. Examines key challenges, such as: how uncovering truth should be balanced with providing justice; whether strategies focused on individual rights and criminal responsibility can alleviate social and economic injustices; and whether conflicting identities should be forgotten or transcended. Incorporates discussion of theoretical frameworks for addressing distributional conflicts, the politics of identity, and the politics of memory.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4560 - International Organization

    Studies efforts by state and non-state actors to organize and institutionalize international politics. Considers classical explanations for why states cooperate to form international institutions, and how these wield authority in a world of sovereign states. Examines the rise of non-state actors, including international non-governmental organizations (INGOs), terrorist networks, and transnational religious organizations. Specific cases discussed, including: the United Nations; the European Union, ASEAN, and other regional organizations; and various INGOs.

    Requisites: 6 hours in POLS (POLS 2500 recommended)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 seminar

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4565 - International Human Rights

    Studies human rights as a vehicle for moral and legal change in international politics. Considers various ways of thinking about what human rights are and how they work at the international level. With a focus on the United Nations system, the course assesses problems and debates concerning the implementation and enforcement of human rights. Addresses difficult questions such as: How well do treaties work in promoting human rights? How can human rights be enforced in the absence of higher authority? And what role do non-state actors play? Considers case studies in a variety of issue-areas, such as: the use of torture, war crimes, indigenous rights, women¿s rights, and the right to development.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4570 - National Security in the Contemporary Era

    Introduces the concepts and problems of attaining international "security" in an ever-changing world. Profound changes at the international level have taken place in the past decade which have had a major impact on how we conceive of security. Provides an overview of the traditional and new sources for insecurity and explores the consequences of states' quests for security in the contemporary era.

    Requisites: 6 hours in POLS (POLS 2500 recommended)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4580 - Introduction to War and its Causes

    Introduces the concept and causes of war. Discusses the phenomenon of war in the broader context of social behavior, and explores the natural or unnatural elements of international violence.

    Requisites: 6 hours in POLS (POLS 2500 recommended)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4590 - Terrorism

    Introduces the phenomenon of terrorism, in both its domestic and international forms. Through comparative case studies, aims to understand the motivations, goals, tactics, and strategies of terrorism. Considers the relationship between terrorists and the various political and cultural groups with which they interact from states and international authorities to transnational criminal networks and religious communities. Addresses the historical responses of state, regional, and international actors to terrorism and assesses competing views on how the United States and other nations could and should respond to this threat.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4600 - International Political Economy

    Examines the politics of the world economy. Topics covered include the politics of international trade, the politics of the international monetary system, and international cooperation.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4630 - African International Relations

    Overview of political, economic, and social issues that shape the external relations of African nations, and of non-state and international participants in these relations.

    Requisites: POLS 2500 or 3540

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4650 - Global Media Politics

    This course studies mediated communication in global politics, including both the impact of mass media on the foreign policies of states and the more recent use of social media by state and non-state actors. Readings and discussions address the role of mediated communication in public opinion, political mobilization, citizenship, identity, global justice, and democratic deliberation. The course uses historical and contemporary case studies germane to the study of international politics, including major wars, revolutionary movements, breaches of state secrecy and cybersecurity, Internet freedom, and efforts to promote global political dialogue. Students consider both tendencies of mediated communication to sow enmity and conflict and opposing trends toward universal connectivity and transnational citizenship.

    Requisites: 6 hours in POLS or (Jr or Sr)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4700 - Democratic Theories and Practices

    Placing contemporary democracies in both historical and comparative context, examines the relationship between legitimacy, authority, participation and voice. Central focus is the 'edges' or boundaries of democracies: is there a private realm at the edge of democracy? How is it established? What is democracy's jurisdiction? There are margins within and outside of a democratic community, where lines between insiders and outsiders are drawn and redrawn. How do location and membership shape our practices of democratic responsibility? What is the relationship between injustice and democracy?

    Requisites: 6 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4705 - The Politics of Rights

    There are few legal, normative, and political issues more important than the efforts and struggles surrounding rights. It could be argued that the emergence of democratic political systems rested much of their legitimacy upon the claim that they guaranteed certain fundamental rights for citizens. Course examines the multifaceted character of rights discourse and struggles. The varied origins of rights narratives will be explored, as well as the controversies over the extension and effectiveness of rights to diverse populations. Students think critically about the rights they take for granted as well as the rights yet to be granted, to themselves and/or others.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4710 - Contemporary Radical and Critical Theories

    Examines contemporary political and social theories that have been critical of historically hegemonic ideas and regimes. Begins with theories that assume a relationship between knowledge and power, and also between theory and practice. Includes expansive concepts of politics that go beyond government. Theories such as Marxism, psychoanalysis, structuralism and post-structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, anarchism, animal rights, critical race theory and postcolonial theory may be examined.

    Requisites: POLS 2700

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4720 - Resistance, Reform, and Revolution

    Explores the intertwined character of power and resistance. In the process, gain both an understanding of forms of power and resistance in everyday life, and to use such an understanding to negotiate the power in our own lives. Also explores how power is not only prohibitive, but productive; and attempts to figure out what that means for our quests to live good lives and to experience freedom.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4730 - Animal/Human/Machine

    Political theorists are concerned with concepts of political agency. How does political action occur? Who can be political? What are the terms of political discourse? During the past 10-15 years, a "post-humanist" discourse has emerged. This has come from two main sources. First, a whole of host of studies in psychology and biology have challenged the idea of human exceptionalism (i.e. the idea that humans are a unique animal). In study after study, things once thought to be unique to humans are found in animals (use of tools, communication of relatively complex ideas that some call language acquisition, emotions, laughter, lying, making war, etc.). This is not coming from animal rights, but from science itself. Second, technology and experiments with artificial intelligence, computers, social networking, sex-change surgery, artificial insemination, etc. have challenged us to find new ways to conceptualize thought and the body. These also challenge what it means to be human. Given that an assumption about the stability of the category "human" has been the principle anchor for all theories of politics up till now, these scientific discussions pose important problems for politics, and consequently, for political science.

    Requisites: POLS 2700 or permission required

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4738 - The Politics of Race in Global Context

    Examines the transnational origins, scope, and diffusion of racial ideas and materiality. Begins with a basic introduction to the concept of race, its origins and evolution in the global realm and its subsequent centrality to discourses of modernity, empire and capitalism. Explores race as a system of global power relations that has changed over time, manifests differently across space, and exists on multiple planes. Close attention is paid to the operation of racial politics along multiple geographic and temporal scales in order to discover how race can independently affect both domestic policy outcomes and international relations among nation-states.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4739 - Politics of Race

    Examines various, intricate relationships between race and politics in the United States. Starts with a basic introduction to the concept of race, its origins and evolution. Attention paid early on to the contradictory projects of democracy and racial hierarchy, specifically, the enterprise of white supremacy. Looks at past and present racial topographies, including, but not limited to, trends in partisanship, political ideology and voter turnout per racial group. Examines how the three branches of government have supported America's war on drugs, and subsequently how this war has differentially impacted the American people on lines of race, gender, and class. Investigates how racial identity is shaped by varying economic, social and political contexts, and further how these identities can be mobilized for collective purposes. We think critically about what is at stake in adhering to or diverging from particular racial identities in the political and social arena, how racial identities are policed by group members, and lastly, what is at stake in defining racial authenticity. Last set of readings treat the ways racial anxieties are manipulated during electoral campaigns as a strategy for specific political gains.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in POLS including 2700

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4740 - Sexuality and Queer Theories

    Explores intersections of gender and sexuality with other primary forms of identity including but not limited to race, ethnicity, religiosity, class and culture. Queer theorizing explored both as a critical tool and as a resource for a more transformative alternative politics.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4751 - Critical Race Theory

    Examines, analyzes, and theorizes race and racism from a critical and politicized perspective. This rich theorectical perspective points out that racism is still a pervasive part of contemporary societies, and seeks out effective ways to challenge racism's existence and impact on various groups and societies. Examines Critical Race Theory as a theoretical and political alternative for understanding and criticizing racism in contemporary settings. Critical Race Theory critiques perspectives that claim far-reaching progress has been made combating racism. Challenges students to think in new ways about contemporary manifestations of racism. Explores innovative ways to challenge the widespread prevalence of racism.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in AAS or 6 hours in POLS or 6 hours in WGS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4752 - The Politics of Intersectionality

    Examines the emergence and prevalence of 'intersectionality' as a theoretical framework, political practice, and terrain of lived experience. Intersectionality signifies the simultaneity of identities and is commonly considered a robust approach to examining complicated, lived experiences. Intersectionality illuminates how multiple forms of disempowerment intersect and interact with one another, and captures the ways such intersections lead to deeper and more complex forms of subordination. Examines how a person who suffers from racism, poverty, and sexism has a much different lived experience than a person who may experience racist oppression, but whose sex and class status are privileged according to societal norms and expectations.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in AAS or 6 hours in POLS or 6 hours in WGS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4753 - American Whiteness

    Engages Critical Race Theory and Critical White Studies in order to better understand how 'whiteness' perpetuates itself and racism as well. Critically examines the concept of whiteness, and what it has meant to the (white) public over time. To what extent is being white a biological, ideological, psychological, or political phenomenon? Introduces theories of whiteness as a legal construction, as a privileged status, and as a dynamic social identity. Aids understanding the political meaning of whiteness by examining the relationship of whiteness to American citizenship, immigrants' motivations to assimilate into whiteness, and by learning how politicians and governmental bodies have protected the interests of white Americans by inscribing white privilege into public policies. Investigates white American public opinion on political issues, their attitudes about people of color, as well as what they think about their own racial group and racial identity. Discusses the normative quality of white racial identity, and how colorblind ideology makes it difficult to see and understand whiteness as power and privilege. Examines the contexts in which whiteness is made visible, and how awareness of white racial identity can be cultivated.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in AAS or 6 hours in POLS or 6 hours in WGS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4754 - Black Political Thought

    Surveys various ideological traditions that have inspired the political visions and agendas of Black Americans. Though white supremacy has negatively affected the lives of Black Americans for centuries, the response to racial oppression has been far from monolithic. In challenging white hegemony and racial oppression, Black thinkers have addressed the contradictions inherent in the joint projects of egalitarianism and racial hierarchy. Some of the greatest contributions to American political thought emerged from competing ideological frameworks, such as the debate over accommodation versus full and immediate racial integration, nonviolence versus self-defense, and socialism versus capitalist entrepreneurship, just to name a handful of contests. In envisioning an optimal racial environment, generations of activists have inserted their concerns over other related social arrangements such as sexism, classism and heterosexism, and have consequently pushed Black and non-Black Americans alike to imagine their ideal political conditions.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in AAS or 6 hours in POLS or 6 hours in WGS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4755 - Latinos and Politics

    Explores the histories and contemporary politics of the diverse and expanding Latino population. Focuses on people of Mexican, Puerto Rican and Cuban descent, but incorporates other groups where information is available. Covers how patterns of immigration and resources shape the foundation for Latinos' political incorporation and mobilization within the United States. Examines the political needs and goals of various Latino sub-groups by studying public opinion, voting patterns and non-electoral behavior, and will assess the extent to which these groups are able to achieve their visions. Reflects upon the unity and tension within this group. Assesses whether Latinos have a set of political attitudes and behaviors that distinguish them from other racial groups.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in AAS or 6 hours in POLS or 6 hours in WGS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4756 - The Politics of Visibility

    Vision and visibility are key organizing features of political inquiry, responsibility, governability, and contestation. Particularly in a contemporary setting inundated with technologies for seeing and rendering a wide variety of subjects and phenomena visible, power and visibility have become intrinsically interconnected. Studies the various manifestations of vision, visibility, and invisibility. Racialized politics of visibility especially emphasized, along with the multifaceted ways that visible identities more generally render some bodies and subjects more susceptible to political surveillance, social control, and discrimination.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in AAS or 6 hours in POLS or 6 hours in WGS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4757 - Race, Violence and Human Security

    There are few issues in contemporary politics more important than human security. There are also few forms of oppression and discrimination more important than racism. Yet, envisioning and seeing the various ways that racism leads to vast and deep human insecurity have generally been neglected as political problems and inquiries. Addresses racism and racial violence as human security issues, encouraging students to search out creative ways to reduce the varied hostile environments that emerge from racist forces.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in AAS or 6 hours in POLS or 6 hours in WGS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4758 - Race and Public Policy in Comparative Perspective

    Seeks to conceptualize, explore and explain the complex relationships between race and the creation, implementation and evaluation of public policy. First half offers overview of some dominant theories of public policy, including rational actor models, institutionalism, policy framing and agenda-setting, causal stories, and policy networks. Second, applies these theories in order to complete a more in-depth examination of policy areas that have either implicitly or explicitly institutionalized racial difference and/or disadvantage. Focus will be comparative; though substantial examples drawn from the United States and the industrialized world, also draws insights from developing contexts as necessary.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in AAS or 6 hours in POLS or 6 hours in WGS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4759 - Interracial Transgressions

    Explores multiple arenas of interracial transgressions. Explores the complexities of interracial transgressions by analyzing the role of politics, law, policy, literature, film, geopolitics and vernacular discourse in the construction of interracial relationships, transracial contact zones and multiracial identities. Drawing from case studies in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, South Africa, Australia and Brazil, examines a wide variety of issues related to the construction of mixed-race as a social identity and mode of racial classification, and the potential for racial transgressions in areas of sex, love, friendship, media, dance, music and geography, paying particular attention to the complex relationships among race, gender, class, and sexuality.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in AAS or 6 hours in POLS or 6 hours in WGS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4760 - American Political Thought

    Origin and development of political ideas in the U.S. experience.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4765 - Diaspora, Transnationalism and Post-Colonialism

    This course introduces students to the theories, concepts and applications of the field of post-colonial, transnational and diaspora studies. As post-colonial studies is a wide field, we are engaged here in acquiring a working knowledge of its major ideas, conceptual platforms and methods of inquiry that are the bases of post-colonial studies. We will be examining some of the key themes in post-colonial studies, as well as reading some of the foundational texts on which the field of post-colonial studies is grounded. The varied and multi-disciplinary fields of study that form our theoretical framework are founded on three premises: a) that whilst the era of formal colonialism is over, the social institutions, cultural practices and ideological formations produced by colonialism and other forms of oppression have left their legacy in the contemporary world; b) that mainstream ways of thought, interpretation and action have been informed and continue to be permeated by dominant conceptions from the West; and c) that race is a transnational phenomenon, tied to and imbued with the power of modernity. These foundations provide some identifiable common denominators: a willingness to challenge the hegemonic assumptions of the West; a moral imperative to understand history and society from the point of view of those it has least benefited and who have been marginalized and even oppressed; an understanding that the current world system is the result of a world-historical racial project; and as a result, a theoretical commitment to developing new, more inclusive and more progressive ways of thinking and analyzing social, economical, political and historical forces that critically interrogate Western hegemonic forms of knowledge. Post-colonialism therefore includes studies of the formal colonial period and its aftermath. We are here mostly concerned with ¿late colonialism,¿ and the majority of this course will focus, although not exclusively, on the British colonial empire. This course is highly theoretical and interdisciplinary. Material will be chosen from a wide variety of geographical areas and from post-colonial thinkers from different disciplines.

    Requisites: 6 Hours in AAS or 6 hours in POLS or 6 hours in WGS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4770 - Legal Theory and Social Problems

    Examination of legal reasoning and normative values of judges, lawyers, and legal theorists, in shaping legal solutions to contemporary social problems.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4780 - Feminist Political Theories and Movements

    Explores feminist work as both a vital critical perspective and a source of alternative and transformative visions. Examine mechanisms and manifestations of patriarchy as they play out across fields of struggle--cultural, social, economic, as well as traditional political spaces. The relationship between patriarchal forms of oppression and other practices of domination--race, sexuality, class, or ethnicity based critically analyzed. Normative visions generated from feminist perspectives explored as alternatives to patriarchal orderings.

    Requisites: POLS 2700 and WGS 1000

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4805 - Political Science Fiction

    Science fiction holds a mirror to the norms, rules and institutions that exist in the contemporary political world, engaging in fundamental comparisons about the way the world is, how it came to be, and what alternatives may exist for the political future. Examining and analyzing the prominent themes and issues in these fictional worlds sheds light on past, present, and future political phenomena of our real one. The course examines works of science fiction (both literature and film) side-by-side with political analyses of a variety of topics: state- and nation-building, war and peace-building, citizenship, race, gender, bio-ethics, revolution and rebellion, the military industrial complex, capitalism and democracy. For example, fiction works that may be used in the course include Foundations, Game of Thrones, the Hunger Games, World War Z, the Handmaid¿s Tale, Battlestar Galactica, Star Trek, etc. Science fiction literature and film are points of departure for a more substantive focus on these and other important issues in contemporary politics.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS including (POLS 2000 or 2300 or 2500 or 2700)

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4830 - Introduction to Research Design

    Principles and techniques of social science research.

    Requisites: 12 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4840 - The Politics of Sustainability

    Political questions are interwoven throughout the discourse and practice of sustainability. Is there a difference between sustainability and sustainable development? Is environmental sustainability the paramount goal, or should natural capital be sacrificed to pursue economic prosperity and social equity? Analyzes the inherent ambiguities of the three dimensions of sustainability--environmental, economic and social sustainability--and the political challenges associated with achieving sustainability at the local, national and global scales.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4880 - Environmental and Public Policy Dispute Resolution

    Examines how collaborative dispute resolution approaches can be used to address complex public issues such as land use disputes, the management of natural resources, and the use of social services. Topics and skill building exercises include conflict assessment, consensus-based decision-making, interest-based negotiation, mediation, and the politics of public dispute resolution.

    Requisites: Jr or Sr

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4900 - Special Topics in Political Science

    Specific course content will vary with offering.

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4901 - Special Topics in American Politics

    In-depth exploration of a special topic in American politics. Exposed to key concepts, theoretical debates, and/or methodological concerns with respect to the field of American politics.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4902 - Special Topics in Law and Politics

    In-depth exploration of a special topic in the study of law and politics. Exposed to advanced research, key concepts, theoretical debates, and/or methodological concerns with respect to the study of the politics of law in domestic and global settings. .

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4903 - Special Topics in Political Theory

    In-depth exploration of a special topic in political theory. Exposed to key concepts, theoretical frameworks, and or methodological concerns with respect to the field of political theory.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4904 - Special Topics in International Relations

    In-depth exploration of a special topic in international relations. Study relevant cases, as well as the theories and concepts scholars and practitioners use to understand the topic under consideration.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4905 - Special Topics in Comparative Politics

    In-depth exploration of a special topic in comparative politics. Exposed to key concepts, theoretical debates, and/or methodological concerns with respect to the field of comparative politics.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS

    Credits: 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4910 - Public Affairs Internship

    Provides qualified students with the opportunity to learn through working in selected public and private agencies related to public affairs.

    Requisites: POLS major and (Jr or Sr)

    Credits: 1 - 12

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 internship

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4911 - International Internship

    Internship outside the United States.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS and (Jr or Sr)

    Credits: 1 - 12

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 internship

    Eligible Grades: F,CR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4931 - Independent Study in American Politics

    Independent study designed to expand understanding in a selected area of American politics not covered in regular course offerings.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 independent study

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4932 - Independent Study in Law and Politics

    Independent study designed to expand understanding in a selected area of law and politics not covered in regular course offerings.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 independent study

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4933 - Independent Study in Political Theory

    Independent study designed to expand understanding in a selected area of political theory not covered in regular course offerings.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 independent study

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4934 - Independent Study in International Relations

    Independent study designed to expand understanding in a selected area of international relations not covered in regular course offerings.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 independent study

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4935 - Independent Study in Comparative Politics

    Independent study designed to expand understanding in a selected area of comparative politics not covered in regular course offerings.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 independent study

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4941 - Research in American Politics

    Individual supervised research on a selected aspect of American government and politics based on student's special interest.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 research

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4942 - Research in Law and Politics

    Individual supervised research on a selected aspect of law and politics based on student's special interest.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 research

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4943 - Research in Political Theory

    Individual supervised research or directed readings on a selected aspect of political theory based on student's special interest.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 research

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4980T - Political Science Thesis Tutorial

    Honors tutorial thesis in political science.

    Requisites: HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 tutorial

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4970T - Political Science Thesis Tutorial

    Honors tutorial thesis in political science

    Requisites: HTC

    Credits: 1 - 15

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 15.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 tutorial

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4961 - International Internship Seminar

    Internship outside the United States.

    Requisites: 9 Hours in POLS and (Jr or Sr)

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 seminar

    Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4945 - Research in Comparative Politics

    Individual supervised research on a selected aspect of comparative government and politics based on student's special interest.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 research

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • POLS 4944 - Research in International Relations

    Individual supervised research on a selected aspect of international relations based on student's special interest.

    Requisites: Permission required

    Credits: 1 - 3

    Repeat/Retake Information: May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.

    Lecture/Lab Hours: 1.0 research

    Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

  • College of Arts & Sciences