Ohio University

Philosophy Undergraduate Courses

<h2>PHIL 1010 - Fundamentals of Philosophy</h2><p>Survey of selected basic problems, concepts, and methods in philosophy. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 1200 - Principles of Reasoning</h2><p>Basic concepts of logic and techniques for judging validity of arguments introduced. System for symbolizing arguments and deriving conclusions from premises employed. Some of following topics also covered: informal fallacies in reasoning, syllogistic or Aristotelian logic; Venn diagrams, truth tables. Most sections are traditional lecture/test format, some taught in computer-assisted format, others use self-paced approach. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Math Placement Level 1 or higher or (MATH D004 or MATH D005)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 1M</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture, 1.0 discussion</p>
<h2>PHIL 1300 - Introduction to Ethics</h2><p>Discussion of classic and/or modern philosophical views of human values, ideals, and morality. Provides introductory survey of some main problems, concepts, and results of ethics including selected philosophers of past and present. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 2160 - Philosophy of Science Survey</h2><p>Nontechnical survey of types, testing, and credibility of hypotheses; methods of experimental inquiry; measurement; laws, theories and their role in explanation, concept formation. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 2310 - Philosophy of Sport</h2><p>Philosophical exploration into nature, meaning, purposes, values, and ideals of sport. Topics include goods and evils of competition, nature of sports experience, winning and losing, aesthetic and ethical dimensions of sport, ultimate athlete, scholastic athletics, philosophy of physical education, concept of sportsmanship, etc.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 2320 - Philosophy of Art</h2><p>Conceptual analysis of common assumptions, attitudes, theories, and ideas about arts, their criticism, and appreciation.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 2350 - Business Ethics</h2><p>Examination of moral reasoning as it pertains to institutions and practices of contemporary business. First half is devoted to basic ethical concepts and analysis of basis for acceptable ethical theory, investigation of role of government and society in their relationship to business, and value assumptions behind competing social and political systems business personnel encounter in today's global marketplace. Second half examines specific case studies. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 2400 - Social and Political Philosophy</h2><p>Introduction to major philosophical theories concerning nature of social and political communities including those offered by Plato, Aquinas, Hobbes, Locke, Mill, and Rawls. Consideration of some significant specialized problems in social and political theory including distributive justice, civil disobedience, liberty, punishment, etc. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 2500 - Philosophy of Mind</h2><p>Mind-body problem; concept of self; human-machine relation; problems of other minds.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 2600 - Philosophy of Religion</h2><p>Problems in nature of religion, existence and the nature of God; problem of evil, immortality, and religious language. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 2970T - Philosophy Tutorial</h2><p>1st-yr tutorial studies in Philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 9</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 6.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>PHIL 2980T - Philosophy Tutorial</h2><p>1st-yr tutorial studies in philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 9</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 6.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>PHIL 3010J - Writing With Critical Reasoning Skills</h2><p>This is a writing intensive course whose topics for student essays will vary depending upon instructor. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> (PHIL 1010 or 1300) and (Jr or Sr)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 1J</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3100 - History of Western Philosophy: Ancient</h2><p>Significant ideas of representative Greek and Roman philosophers.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3110 - History of Western Philosophy: Medieval and Renaissance</h2><p>Augustine to Bruno and Campanella.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3120 - History of Western Philosophy: Modern</h2><p>17th and 18th century European philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3140 - 19th Century European Philosophy</h2><p>Subjects selected from French, German, and British philosophers of 19th century.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3200 - Symbolic Logic I</h2><p>Techniques of modern symbolic logic.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3300 - Ethics</h2><p>Study focusing on specific philosopher, or one type of ethical or value theory. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3310 - Moral Problems in Medicine</h2><p>Philosophical investigation of complex moral problems engendered by modern medicine, e.g., death with dignity, human experimentation, allocation of scarce medical resources, birth defects, killing or letting die, informed consent, etc. Basic philosophical concepts underlying these problems explored, including autonomy, coercion, normality, naturalness, rights, justice, responsibility, personhood, etc. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3320 - Philosophy of Sex and Love</h2><p>Philosophical and evaluative investigation into subject of sexual love and Western morality. Topics include roles and relations between sexes, abortion, monogamy, sexual perversion, homosexuality, promiscuity, adultery, semantics of sex, etc.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3330 - Philosophy of Literature</h2><p>Examines nature of fictional literature as differentiated from other types of writing. Explores philosophical ideas within specific works of fiction, concentrating on problems of translating philosophical content into literary form, interpretation, belief, truth, and artistic integrity.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3350 - Environmental Ethics</h2><p>How should we value nature? What is important about it, and why? Is it important to us because caring for nature advances our interests, or because it is valuable in its own right? Do animals have special claims upon us? Should our primary concern be for individual organisms, or for species? Aims at thinking through some of the questions that surround the idea of valuing the environment in which we live, and understanding possible views as to the source and nature of that value. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3500 - Philosophy of Culture</h2><p>Philosophical studies of humankind as culture-creating beings.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3510 - Philosophy of Language</h2><p>Theories of meaning and reference and their philosophical significance, relations of meaning to verification and truth, and relationship between language and concepts.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 6 Hours in PHIL including (1200 or 3200)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3580 - Existentialism</h2><p>Existential thought from Kierkegaard to Camus stressing such themes as freedom, existence, despair, authenticity, alienation, death, and revolt against system.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 3970T - Philosophy Tutorial</h2><p>2nd-yr tutorial studies in philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 9</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 6.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>PHIL 3980T - Philosophy Tutorial</h2><p>2nd-yr tutorial studies in Philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 9</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 6.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>PHIL 4120 - Philosophy of Biology</h2><p>An analysis of such issues as the structure of theory in biology, whether biology differs from other sciences; whether species exist, natural selection, how taxonomy should be done, and whether biology raises any ethical issues.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> BIOS 1710</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4130 - Philosophy and Freudian Analysis</h2><p>The philosophical and scientific presuppositions of Freudian psychology (including Freud's methodology) will be identified and subjected to rigorous philosophical analysis. Freud's early thought on hysteria, dreams, sexuality, and psychoanalysis will be emphasized. Recent attacks on the legitimacy of psychoanalysis will be examined. Alternative schemes for understanding human behavior will also be discussed.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> PSY 2710 or 3320</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4140 - Analytic Philosophy</h2><p>Selected topics in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4160 - Philosophy of Science</h2><p>Selected problems in logic and methodology of sciences.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 3 Courses in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4170 - Philosophy of Logic</h2><p>Provides a survey of issues in the philosophy of logic. Topics include formal theories of truth, logical and semantical paradoxes, modal logic, conditionals, interpretations of quantifiers, and philosophical implications of Godel's incompleteness theorems.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CS 3000 or PHIL 3200</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4180 - Plato</h2><p>[Seminar contents vary.] </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including 3100</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4190 - Aristotle</h2><p>[Seminar contents vary.] </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including 3100</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4200 - Symbolic Logic II</h2><p>Techniques of modern symbolic logic. Focuses on the completeness of first-order logic, Godel's incompleteness theorems, axiomatic set theory, and Cantor's and Dedekind's theories of the infinite.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> PHIL 3200</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4250 - Philosophical Problems in Quantum Physics</h2><p>Interpretation and paradoxes of quantum theory. Topics include the problem of measurement, the Bohr-Einstein debates, Schrodinger's cat paradox, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox, and Bell's Theorem and its implications.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 2 Courses in (CHEM or CS or MATH or PHIL or PHYS)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4260 - Philosophy of Space and Time</h2><p>In addition to classical topics, issues in the philosophy of space and time that have been greatly influenced by the emergence of Einstein's theory of relativity will be discussed. Topics to be covered include the nature of geometry and its relation to the world, absolute vs. relational theories of space, time, and space-time, and Zeno's paradoxes of motion and extension. Contemporary and classical thinkers will be examined.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 2 Courses in (CHEM or CS or MATH or PHIL or PHYS)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4270 - Philosophy of Mathematics</h2><p>An in-depth examination of a major work in the philosophy of mathematics or of a particular concept that plays a central role in mathematical philosophy, such as the concept of number, the concept of mathematical proof, and the concept of the mathematical infinite.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 2 Courses in (CHEM or CS or MATH or PHIL or PHYS)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4280 - Continental Rationalism</h2><p>Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including 3120</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4290 - British Empiricism</h2><p>Locke, Berkeley, Hume.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including 3120</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4300 - Ethical Theory</h2><p>Significant current literature in selected topics of moral, social, political, and legal philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including (1300 or 3300)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4310 - History of Aesthetic Theory</h2><p>Readings from Plato to Dewey and relation of these theories to selected arts and recent criticism.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4320 - Problems in Aesthetics</h2><p>A variety of philosophical issues surrounding the arts and aesthetics drawn from contemporary sources will be discussed. Topics include the nature of art, expression, interpretation, evaluation, and art and knowledge.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in (PHIL or LIT or ARTS)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4340 - Metaethics</h2><p>The study of metaethics is the study of the nature of ethical or normative judgments. What are we doing when we make ethical judgments? Is it right to think that ethical judgments are capable of being true or false? If so, in virtue of what? We can also wonder about the moral motivation. Does a judgment that something is morally wrong automatically entail that one has a motive not to do it? This course will be a survey of readings on these two questions.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 3 Courses in PHIL and (1300 or 2400 or 4300)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4380 - Kant</h2><p>Kant's Critique of Pure Reason with attention given to his ethical theory.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including 3120</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4400 - Contemporary Social Philosophy</h2><p>Consideration of any number of various issues in contemporary, social, political, and legal philosophy. Possible topics: theories of distributive justice, culpability, causality and responsibility, legal and moral rights, etc. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL or (2 Courses in PHIL and 9 hours Tier II Social Sciences)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 4420 - Philosophy of Law</h2><p>Consideration of nature and justification of law and examination of some specialized topics in philosophy of law, including ascription of responsibility, civil disobedience, theories of punishment, liberty, etc. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 3 Courses in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 4440 - Philosophy of Marxism</h2><p>Philosophical inquiry into classical and contemporary Marxist thought stressing Marx, Engels, Lenin, Stalin, Mao, and several contemporary Marxists such as Praxis group of Yugoslavia.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4460 - Justice and Liberty</h2><p>A survey of moral and political conceptions of the values of liberty and justice, their interaction, and the way they should shape political institutions.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 3 Hours in PHIL and (1300 or 2400)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4480 - Pragmatism</h2><p>Peirce, James, Dewey, and other American thinkers.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4500 - Theory of Knowledge</h2><p>Critical examination of various views of what knowledge is and how it is attained.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including 3120</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4510 - Metaphysics</h2><p>Discussion of basic philosophical issues such as: conceptual schemes and the external world, causation, universals, determinism and freedom, the nature of the mind, etc.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including (3100 or 3120)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4580 - Contemporary European Philosophy</h2><p>Phenomenology and existentialism as seen in Husserl, Heidegger, Scheler, Hartman, Dilthey, Cassirer, Gebser, Ingarden, Sartre, Camus, Marcel, Merleau-Ponty, and Ricoeur.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including (3580 and 4680)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4590 - Contemporary French Philosophy</h2><p>A detailed examination of the central problems in contemporary French philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including (3580 and 4680)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4680 - Phenomenology</h2><p>Method and philosophy of phenomenological movement from Husserl to Merleau-Ponty.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 4 Courses in PHIL including 3120</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4750 - Chinese Philosophy</h2><p>Major Chinese philosophers and schools of thought from earliest times to present.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLWR 3350 and 4 courses in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4760 - Indian Philosophy</h2><p>Classical Hinduism.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLWR 3340 and 4 courses in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4770 - Buddhist Philosophy</h2><p>Abhidharmika, Madhyamika, Yogacara, Zen, and other philosophical doctrines of Buddhism.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLWR 3350 and 4 courses in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4780 - African Philosophy</h2><p>Critical examination of the question, debated today among African philosophers, whether traditional Africans thought systems should be regarded and developed as philosophical systems. Includes survey of most significant of these thought systems.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4901 - Senior Seminar</h2><p>Survey of selected subfields of philosophy. Required of all majors in philosophy during the senior year.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> PHIL 3100 and 3120 and 3200 and Sr only</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4911 - Seminar in Philosophy</h2><p>Selected problems.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 5 courses in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 9.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4921 - Applied Ethics</h2><p>An examination of the relationship of applied ethics to ethics as a branch of philosophy, a survey of major areas within applied ethics (medical, business, journalistic, etc.), and a consideration of selected problems in each area.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 2 Courses in (PHIL 1300 or 2350 or 3300 or 3310 or 4300)</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4970 - Independent Reading</h2><p>Seminar contents vary.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Permission required</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>PHIL 4970T - Philosophy Tutorial</h2><p>3rd-yr tutorial studies in Philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 9</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 6.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>PHIL 4980T - Philosophy Tutorial</h2><p>3rd-yr tutorial studies in Philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 9</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 6.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>PHIL 4990 - Senior Thesis</h2><p>Must be enrolled in each of two senior semesters to achieve honors in Philosophy. Research and writing of long philosophical paper.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 2900 - Special Topics in Philosophy</h2><p>Specific course content will vary with offering.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 15</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 4900 - Special Topics in Philosophy</h2><p>Specific course content will vary with offering.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 15</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 lecture</p>
<h2>PHIL 4520 - Evolution of Human Cognition and Cooperation</h2><p>The evolution of human cognition and cooperation is an interdisciplinary topic involving evolutionary biology, behavioral ecology, psychology, anthropology, archaeology, economics, and philosophy. It also has implications for traditional philosophical questions about human nature, the architecture of the human mind, human morality, and social contract theory. This course introduces basic theoretical tools used in the literature, especially evolutionary game theory and multilevel selection theory, and discusses both classic and recent works on this topic. The format of the course is a research seminar, where the participants give presentations and lead discussions.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> 9 Hours in PHIL</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 seminar</p>
<h2>PHIL 4910 - Internship in Philosophy</h2><p>This course will situate the student with an approved, external employer or non-profit venue in order to help the student gain experience in applying to the workplace what he or she has learned from philosophy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 6.0 field experience/internship</p>