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History Graduate Courses

HIST 5000 - Atlantic History

Using a comparative global perspective, explores the interactions between Europe, Africa, and the Americas during the age of European oceanic expansion. Covers Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, and English empires and societies, Native American societies and interactions with Europeans, African societies, the rise of the slave trade and growth of African-American identity. Other topics include migration, the Columbian exchange, war, trade, religion, piracy, gender, and metropolitan authority. Encourages comparison between empires, cultures, and geographical regions even as it appreciates how intertwined and entangled these histories sometimes could be.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5002 - Colonial British North America

Covers North American history from initial British settlement to the conclusion of the French and Indian War. In this time British colonies evolved into increasingly mature, stable societies. Demographic and economic expansion made possible a prosperous and relatively egalitarian society, which in turn affected the legal and political settlement. Yet, amidst all these promising developments, African slavery and the dispossession of Native Americans became ever more deeply entrenched. Examines the expansion of the British American empire and the costs this empire exacted. Topics covered include: pre-Columbian Native American societies, early English settlement, the Caribbean, comparative colonial development, trade, political culture, gender relations and the construction of family, witchcraft, war, migration, evangelical awakenings, urbanization, consumption, and slavery.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5004 - Revolutionary Era

Causes of American Revolution and struggle for independence. Confederation, movement for new government, framing of Constitution.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5008 - Early US Republic

Examines the earliest decades of the new United States, including how diverse peoples in different regions, ethnic groups, and classes struggled to coexist and define what it meant to live under the republican form of government created in 1776 and consolidated in 1787. Will include topics such as institution building, westward expansion and its effects on Native and African-Americans, the nation's place on the world stage, the War of 1812, the emergence of partisanship and party systems, competing understandings of political economy, political culture, and life in the early Republic.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5018 - History of the American South to 1900

Study of the diverse peoples and dynamic socioeconomic, cultural, and political processes that shaped the American South and affected its relationship to the broader world from the colonial period to the emergence of a "New South." Examines the origins and effects of racism and slavery; the regional and national institutions created to sustain and extend slavery; its destruction in the midst of the Civil War; and the complex realities and legacy of emancipation for the region and the nation.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5020 - Survey of American Indian History

Treats Indian societies before European contact; cultural contact, negotiation, and conflict with Spanish, English, and French settlers; United States policy toward Indians; and Indian peoples' diverse strategies of preservation, adaptation, resistance, and accommodation from first contact to the present.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5030 - United States in World War II

Military and diplomatic role of U.S. in WWII; war's political, economic, and social impact on the nation.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5050 - The United States and the Vietnam War

Examination of American experience in Vietnam, both in terms of military and diplomatic history of war itself, and its impact on American society.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5060 - American Environmental History

A survey of the evolution, from 1492 to the present, of American attitudes toward and interactions with the natural world, including such topics as the Columbian Exchange, romanticism, the Western frontier, conservation, the "land ethic," and environmental policy in the 1960s and 1970s.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5081 - The Civil War and its Aftermath

Explores the diverse individuals and processes that brought about the U.S. Civil War, determined its course and outcome, and shaped a complicated and contested settlement. Themes will include military engagements, expansionism, increased sectionalism, race and slavery, political parties, society and institutions in the Union and Confederacy, attempts to restructure Southern society, and developments at the national level in the post-war period.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5090 - American Constitutional History, Part 1: Origins to Reconstruction

Traces the history of American constitutionalism from its English roots through the aftermath of the Civil War. While the purview is not restricted to the federal constitution, that document will form its chief focus. Ideas, institutions, and individuals responsible for the construction of America's unique constitutional heritage are studied in detail.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5095 - American Constitutional History, 1880s-Present

Studies the history of American Constitutionalism from the last half of the 19th- century to the last half of the 20th. Concentration on the Federal Constitution and its role in shaping the public and private lives of Americans. Particular attention will be paid to the ideas, institutions, and individuals responsible for making the Constitution a battleground rife with intellectual, social, and cultural significance.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5100 - Emergence of the Modern United States: Progressive Era and Roaring Twenties

Emphasis on political and cultural history. Major topics include "crisis" of the 1890s; early 20th-century progressivism as an intellectual movement and its manifestations in state and local politics and legal traditions; presidencies of Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson; impact of World War I; origins of mass society in the 1920s, including cultural tensions, political and intellectual history.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5104 - United States, 1945-Present

Emphasis on politics, culture, and foreign policy. Major topics include origins and nature of the Cold War; impact of foreign involvements on American politics; political leadership in the media age; radicalism and social change in the '60s and '70s; the rise of cultural politics and its effect on economic-based political coalitions; resurgence of conservatism in the '70s and '80s.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

HIST 5106 - History of American Conservatism

Introduces students to the intellectual, political, and cultural history of conservatism in the United States, with a major focus on the twentieth century. Identifies and examines the theorists, journalists, economists, politicians, literary figures, and activists who built a coherent body of conservative ideas and a political movement to challenge the prevailing liberal orthodoxy of the post-New Deal era. Highlights the major philosophical themes and practical aims that animated this diverse set of historical actors and often set them at odds with one another: preserving the values, traditions, and institutions that sustained local communities and the nation's constitutional order; maximizing individual liberty in an economic and social context; opposing various forms of collectivism and the encroachment of state power; fighting communism at home and abroad.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I