Ohio University

World Religions Graduate Courses

<h2>CLWR 5330 - Islam</h2><p>Introduces Islam as a religious and cultural system. Topics include pre-Islamic Arabia, the Prophet Muhammad and the first Muslims, the Qur'an and shari'a, basic ritual practices, mysticism, theology and philosophy, Shi'ism, the visual and musical arts, women, modernism, fundamentalism, and Islam in the USA. Draws on historical, sociological, anthropological, and literary-critical approaches and utilizes a range of primary and secondary material to examine the development of Islamic religious practices and ideals as they interact with larger social and cultural processes. While we will be concerned to understand how practitioners of Islam interpret their beliefs and actions, we will also place 'insider' perspectives in a broader social and historical context. Religion is a segment of culture, and thus we undertake our inquiry into Islam in the spirit of the Quranic injunction that 'humanity consider from what it is created'. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5340 - Hinduism</h2><p>Explores Hindu concepts and practices through readings, films, and slide presentations. Traces the origin and development of Hinduism from its roots in Vedic ritual and the indigenous civilizations of Mohenjo Daro and Harrapa. Introduces the Upanishads (perhaps the earliest philosophical texts), the great Hindu Epics, Mahabharata and Ramayana, the Sastras (manuals on Hindu life dating from the early centuries of the current era), the Puranas (medieval compositions telling the stories of the gods), Tantra (an esoteric form of Hinduism), the artistic traditions of Hinduism, and modern Hindu political movements. Special emphasis placed on the Gandhi's interpretation of Hindu teachings of non-violence. Hinduism), the artistic traditions of Hinduism, and modern Hindu political movements. Graduate students write a research paper on a topic of their choosing with approval from the professor.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5350 - Buddhism</h2><p>Introduces Buddhist doctrines, practices and institutions. Focuses on the spread and development of Buddhism across Asia and beyond, with an eye toward examining how foundational Buddhist ideas and practices have taken shape in specific places and in particular historical contexts. Selectively surveys the foundational teachings, history and diversity of Buddhism, from the lifetime of the Buddha in fifth century BCE India to contemporary Buddhist communities in Southeast Asia, East Asia, and North America. Along the way, considers some important questions raised and addressed in the critical study of religion. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5410 - Contemporary Religious Thought</h2><p>Since the end of World War II new movements have arisen in every major religious tradition. This resurgence of religion as a political and social force responds to a widespread and profound concern at the failure of modernity and secular nationalism to bring prosperity and provide meaning for life. Looks at the New Age Movements and Liberation Theology in the 1960s, movements generally called fundamentalist that arose in the 1970s, and militant movements that justify the use of violence that have emerged in the last two decades. Research paper on a major thinker or contemporary movement in one of the great world religious traditions--Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam required. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5420 - Political Islam</h2><p>Why have some Muslims turned to religion as a source for political identity in the contemporary world? What terms should we use to describe this phenomenon? Which individuals and groups have embraced the religio-political renewal, and why have they done so? What forms have the renewal movements taken? In what directions have they developed? What role, in particular, have modernizing states played in the instrumentalizing of Islamic institutions for purposes of control and legitimacy? How have non-state actors--the `ulama', lay activists, social movements--responded to the conditions created by modernizing states? Addresses these questions by exploring a range of case studies in different national/cultural context--Africa (Morocco, Sudan, Somalia), Southeast Asia (Indonesia), Western Europe (France, Germany, the Netherlands), and North America (US and Canada). Through these case studies, probes what we mean by 'political Islam'--but also the politics of Islam, and what the implications are for a wider globalized modernity.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLWR 5330 or HIST 5371</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5430 - Sufism-Mysticism and Asceticism in Islam</h2><p>Introduces the 'mystical' dimension of Islam, known as Sufism. Begins by probing key terms such as 'Sufism,' 'asceticism,' and 'mysticism.' Then traces the emergence of Sufism during the formative period of the Islamic political and religious systems. Bulk of course explores contemporary manifestations of Sufism in diverse locations ranging from South/Southeast Asia and Central Asia to Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and the United States.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLWR 5330 or HIST 5370 or 5371</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5440 - Taoism and Confucianism</h2><p>Historical survey of the philosophical and religious tenets of Taoism and the writings of Confucius, and their social and intellectual impact.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5450 - Women in Buddhist Traditions</h2><p>Explores women and Buddhism during different historical periods and in different cultures. Through a variety of sources, illuminates Buddhist concepts of gender and sexuality, views of women's spiritual capacities, the diversity of women's images, roles, experiences, concerns, and contributions in Buddhist societies, and scholarly approaches to women in Buddhism. Special attention given to how gender is constructed in each cultural and religious context encountered, with particular emphasis on Buddhist women in Southeast Asia. Explores reasons why texts on religion have not always included the voices of women, and investigates ways to uncover them through research techniques and alternative hermeneutical strategies. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5710 - African Religions</h2><p>Surveys the broad array of religious systems and practices that have emerged historically in the African continent. Topics range from Vodun to Zar, Pentecostalism to Islam, as well as practices specific to particular ethnic groups.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5810 - Myth, Ritual and Symbolism</h2><p>Exploration of symbolic thought and the function of myth in contemporary societies. Three case studies are treated comparatively. Research paper required.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5820 - Thinking About Death: Belief and Practice</h2><p>Survey of belief systems regarding death rituals, burial practices and the intersection of the dead and the living, through textual and archaeological evidence.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May not be retaken.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 4.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5930 - Independent Study</h2><p>Intensive individual reading, research, and written analysis on topics selected by the student in negotiation with a faculty member and supervised by that faculty member.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 4</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 8.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 independent study</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>
<h2>CLWR 5900 - Special Topics in World Religions</h2><p>Special topics in aspects of world religions.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 15</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 lecture</p><p>Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I</p>