Ohio University

World Religions Undergraduate Courses

<h2>CLWR 1810 - Introduction to the Study of Religion</h2><p>What is "religion" and how do we study it? The answer may seem obvious but it's not. In this course, we explore religious practices in multiple religious traditions and examine the relationship between religion and a range of other social factors--social class, gender, ethnicity, politics, among others. Along the way, we will also reflect on broader comparative and methodological questions posed by scholars who have studied religion from diverse perspectives (historical, psychological, phenomenological, and sociological).</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 2210 - Difficult Dialogues: Religious Beliefs</h2><p>Introduction to serious, informed discussion of basic intellectual issues in religious belief. One of two Difficult Dialogues courses offered by the Department of Classics and World Religions to encourage thoughtful and productive discussion of historically contentious topics. Discussions concerning religious beliefs are notoriously difficult. They have often devolved into disputes, which have divided families, sundered friendships, and even fueled wars. Experience in navigating difficult dialogues concerning, we believe, transfer into the more generalized skill of productive discussion concerning virtually any difficult topic. So, this class is concerned specifically with learning to think through difficult religious topics and more generally with learning to think through any difficult and contentious topic. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 2220 - Difficult Dialogues: Religion, Gender and Sexuality</h2><p>One of two Difficult Dialogues courses offered to encourage thoughtful and productive discussion of historically contentious topics. Promotes dialogue on conflicts made divisive because of significant differences involving religious beliefs and assumptions about gender and sexuality such as how religious experience is gendered, what scriptures in different traditions say about women, and how religious traditions have changed in the way women and their role in society are viewed. Emphasizes the search for understanding of others whose beliefs are rooted in different religious or secular humanist traditions. Students are asked to engage in disciplined, self-critical thinking. Draws on methods and content from intellectual and religious history, the philosophy of religions, and contemporary religious dialogue. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 2230 - What is Evil?</h2><p>Students will explore the question ¿What is evil?¿ from the perspectives of the major World Religions¿Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. In addition they will explore how evil was conceptualized in core texts of Classical Greece and Ancient Rome. The course begins with a brief introduction to psychological and sociological research which attempts to answer the question ¿Why do good people do evil things?¿ It concludes with a short consideration of representations of evil in popular culture and influential texts written in response to the Holocaust. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 2300 - The Global Occult: Ghosts, Demonology, and the Paranormal in World Religions</h2><p>What does it mean to believe in ghosts? How do people who cast hexes, perform a Black Mass, or hold séances understand their actions and experiences? Designed to address these kinds of questions, this course is a survey, from the perspective of religious studies, of beliefs about ghosts, demons, and supernatural phenomena throughout history and around the world. In their readings, films, and lectures, students will look at ghost traditions from North India, Hawaii, and Europe; exorcism in the U.S., Sri Lanka, and Tibet; demonology in Buddhism, Hinduism, and Zoroastrianism; and witchcraft in England, Italy, and Niger. They will also examine the scientific claims of parapsychology, the practice of necromancy, and accounts of people who report being attacked by evil spirits in their sleep. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2CP</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 2900 - Special Topics in Classics and World Religions</h2><p>Specific course content will vary with offering.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 15</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3310 - Old Testament</h2><p>Explores the writings of the Hebrew Bible (Christian Old Testament), their relationship to the history and culture in which they were produced, and their relevance to more recent issues in modern religious discourse. Covers a range of topics, including divine encounters, worship practices, sacred space, political religion, archaeology, ethics, gender, and memory. Applies several modern approaches as well as survey at various points the 'afterlife' of the Hebrew scriptural traditions in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3320 - New Testament</h2><p>Surveys the writings of the New Testament in their historical, political, social, and religious context of the Jewish and Greco-Roman worlds in the first century. Discussions to gain familiarity with questions of authorship, genre, historical setting, historical accuracy, use of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, etc. Explores modern academic approaches to the New Testament and its relation to such issues as gender, ethics, identity, the body, politics, ritual, and sacred space, among others. While the course does not adopt a faith-based perspective on the New Testament, we will note the importance of selected texts to modern religious communities.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3330 - Introduction to Islam</h2><p>Introduces Islam as a religious and cultural system. Topics include pre-Islamic Arabia, the Prophet Muhammad and the first Muslims, the Qur'an and shari'a, basic ritual practices, mysticism, theology and philosophy, Shi'ism, the visual and musical arts, women, modernism, fundamentalism, and Islam in the USA. Draws on historical, sociological, anthropological, and literary-critical approaches and utilizes a range of primary and secondary material to examine the development of Islamic religious practices and ideals as they interact with larger social and cultural processes. While we will be concerned to understand how practitioners of Islam interpret their beliefs and actions, we will also place 'insider' perspectives in a broader social and historical context. Religion is a segment of culture, and thus we undertake our inquiry into Islam in the spirit of the Quranic injunction that 'humanity consider from what it is created'.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2CP</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3340 - Hinduism</h2><p>Explores Hindu concepts and practices through readings, films, and slide presentations. Traces the origin and development of Hinduism from its roots in Vedic ritual and the indigenous civilizations of Mohenjo Daro and Harrapa. Introduces the Upanishads (perhaps the earliest philosophical texts), the great Hindu Epics, Mahabharata and Ramayana, the Sastras (manuals on Hindu life dating from the early centuries of the current era), the Puranas (medieval compositions telling the stories of the gods), Tantra (an esoteric form of Hinduism), the artistic traditions of Hinduism, and modern Hindu political movements. Special emphasis placed on the Gandhi's interpretation of Hindu teachings of non-violence. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2CP</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3350 - Buddhism</h2><p>Introduces Buddhist doctrines, practices and institutions. Focuses on the spread and development of Buddhism across Asia and beyond, with an eye toward examining how foundational Buddhist ideas and practices have taken shape in specific places and in particular historical contexts. Selectively surveys the foundational teachings, history and diversity of Buddhism, from the lifetime of the Buddha in fifth century BCE India to contemporary Buddhist communities in Southeast Asia, East Asia, and North America. Along the way, considers some important questions raised and addressed in the critical study of religion.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2CP</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3360 - Theories of Religion</h2><p>Surveys the main theoretical orientations that have guided the study of religions within the Humanities and Social Sciences as these fields have developed since the 18th century within the academic institutions of Europe and the United States. Begins with early Enlightenment thinkers who were responding to the wars of religion and the rise of rationalism and empiricism. Continues with 19th and early 20th century scholars who confronted the impact of industrialization, nation-state formation, bureaucratization, technologization, and most of all, the colonization of entire societies and cultures beyond Europe. To listen in on discussions about religion among U.S. and European thinkers during these three centuries is to become privy to the struggles of North Atlantic societies with 'the disenchantment of the world,' that is, the loss of faith in a transcendent purpose connected to a larger divine will. After surveying the classical theories, examines the impact of decolonization on the inherited Enlightenment assumptions concerning religion. Discussion today has raised substantial doubts that the category of 'religion' is of any real empirical or analytical use. Instead, many theorists argue that the inherited conceptions of 'religion' are nothing more than a mask that obscures and justifies Western domination. Other theorists, however, have argued the 'religion' concept is still useful if corrected for its biases. Explores this debate and tries to arrive at one's own conclusions about whether the religion concept is still helpful</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3450 - Self-denial and Religion: Virgins, Monks, Hermits and other Ascetics</h2><p>Examination of asceticism--the rejection of physical pleasure and material wealth--as philosophical and religious ideal in pagan and Christian communities in the world. Focus is on reading ancient texts in translation.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3460 - Religion and Violence</h2><p>Examines religious violence by studying historical case studies from different religious traditions. Themes include divine punishments against humans, martyrdom, forced conversions, persecutions, holy wars, and the importance of religion in contemporary conflicts.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3470 - Gandhi and the Gita: The Religious Roots of Nonviolent Resistance in Colonial India</h2><p>How can a book that seeks to justify extreme violence inspire a man whose name is synonymous with peaceful protest? To answer this question, we will examine the life and thought of M. K. Gandhi through the lens of religion, focusing on the text that served as one of his chief inspirations, the Bhagavad Gita. The Gita is an ancient philosophical poem in which the god Krishna convinces the reluctant warrior Arjuna to initiate a war that will annihilate most of the human race. But to Gandhi, this text was the blueprint for the most successful nonviolent resistance movement in history, the campaign to free India from British control. By reading the Gita and works by and about Gandhi, students will examine the confluence of religion and politics that gave rise to Gandhi and to modern India.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2CP</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3480 - The History of Yoga: From Ancient Discipline to Modern Movement</h2><p>This course traces the history of yoga from ancient texts like the Yoga Sutra to modern practices developed by innovators like Bikram and Iyengar. The course also examines the forms yoga has taken in contemporary western society and the varied responses its popularity has inspired. Along with readings, lectures, films, and discussions, the coursework includes the actual practice of different styles of yoga led by a certified instructor.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2CP</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3610 - American Religions</h2><p>Covers the history of religion in America. Examines the Puritan heritage, the rise of religious revival movements, the invention of new religious traditions (Mormonism), and considers the role of religion in America in the present. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 3850J - Writing on Religion</h2><p>Introduction to primary and secondary sources in the study of religious texts and practices, with the aim of producing and critiquing varying styles of writing about religious phenomena. Focuses on the process of researching and writing, analyzing sources, compiling bibliography, organizing evidence and composing and editing several drafts of each project. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 1J</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4330 - Political Islam</h2><p>Why have some Muslims turned to religion as a source for political identity in the contemporary world? What terms should we use to describe this phenomenon? Which individuals and groups have embraced the religio-political renewal, and why have they done so? What forms have the renewal movements taken? In what directions have they developed? What role, in particular, have modernizing states played in the instrumentalizing of Islamic institutions for purposes of control and legitimacy? How have non-state actors--the `ulama', lay activists, social movements--responded to the conditions created by modernizing states? Addresses these questions by exploring a range of case studies in different national/cultural context--Africa (Morocco, Sudan, Somalia), Southeast Asia (Indonesia), Western Europe (France, Germany, the Netherlands), and North America (US and Canada). Through these case studies, probes what we mean by 'political Islam'--but also the politics of Islam, and what the implications are for a wider globalized modernity.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLWR 3330 or HIST 3371</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4340 - Sufism-Mysticism and Asceticism in Islam</h2><p>Introduces the 'mystical' dimension of Islam, known as Sufism. Begins by probing key terms such as 'Sufism,' 'asceticism,' and 'mysticism.' Then traces the emergence of Sufism during the formative period of the Islamic political and religious systems. Bulk of course explores contemporary manifestations of Sufism in diverse locations ranging from South/Southeast Asia and Central Asia to Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and the United States.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLWR 3330 or HIST 3370 or 3371</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4350 - Women in Buddhist Traditions</h2><p>Explores women and Buddhism during different historical periods and in different cultures. Through a variety of sources, illuminates Buddhist concepts of gender and sexuality, views of women's spiritual capacities, the diversity of women's images, roles, experiences, concerns, and contributions in Buddhist societies, and scholarly approaches to women in Buddhism. Special attention given to how gender is constructed in each cultural and religious context encountered, with particular emphasis on Buddhist women in Southeast Asia. Explores reasons why texts on religion have not always included the voices of women, and investigates ways to uncover them through research techniques and alternative hermeneutical strategies. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLWR 3350</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4410 - Contemporary Religious Thought</h2><p>Since the end of World War II new movements have arisen in every major religious tradition. This resurgence of religion as a political and social force responds to a widespread and profound concern at the failure of modernity and secular nationalism to bring prosperity and provide meaning for life. Looks at the New Age Movements and Liberation Theology in the 1960s, movements generally called fundamentalist that arose in the 1970s, and militant movements that justify the use of violence that have emerged in the last two decades. Research paper on a major thinker or contemporary movement in one of the great world religious traditions--Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam required. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4420 - Religious Experience</h2><p>Examines writings on religious experience beginning with William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience. Psychological and theological accounts of individual religious experience are compared. Students write a research paper.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4430 - Women and Religion</h2><p>Examines images and roles of women in major world religious traditions. We will study religious ideology and its role in shaping social life, the many ways in which women exercise authority in religious traditions, the ways in which women have been innovative in those traditions, and the ways in which women have reinterpreted and re-appropriated patriarchal texts and structures. Students will apply the insights gained in this examination to a project of their own choosing, which should result in a research paper. Students will also have opportunities to increase their understanding of their own religious choices and of religious phenomena more generally. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4440 - Taoism and Confucianism</h2><p>Historical survey of the philosophical and religious tenets of Taoism and the writings of Confucius, and their social and intellectual impact.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4450X - Sex and the Bible</h2><p>In "Sex and the Bible" we look carefully and critically at how concepts of sex, gender, and sexuality are used in the Bible and later biblical interpretation as a fundamental means of shaping and reshaping the interpreter's world in ways both foreign and familiar to modern understandings. We look at the interpretation of the Biblical texts especially as they informed Judeo-Christian thinking about social norms and issues in post-biblical periods. We encounter and examine such topics as gender construction, sexual orientation, taboos, prostitution, idolatry-adultery, family relations, cross-cultural marriage, slavery and trafficking, erotic literature, among others. We interrogate the biblical texts and engage a variety of methods when doing so.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> One course in CLWR or CLAS or CLAR or WGSS or Instructor permission</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4710 - African Religions</h2><p>Surveys the broad array of religious systems and practices that have emerged historically in the African continent. Topics range from Vodun to Zar, Pentecostalism to Islam, as well as practices specific to particular ethnic groups. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4810 - Myth, Ritual, and Symbolism</h2><p>Explores how people use myths, rituals, and symbols to create, conserve, and contest cultural systems of all sorts. Examples are drawn from diverse religious traditions as well as from art, politics, literature, and the media. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4820 - Thinking About Death: Belief and Practice</h2><p>Survey of belief systems regarding death rituals, burial practices and the intersection of the dead and the living, through textual and archaeological evidence.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4900 - Special Topics in World Religions</h2><p>Special topics in aspects of world religions.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLWR 4930 - Independent Study</h2><p>Directed individual reading and research for students who wish to study an area of world religions not covered by a regular course.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Permission required and one course in CLWR</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 independent study</p>
<h2>CLWR 4931H - Departmental Honors Thesis</h2><p>For world religion majors who have been accepted into the Classics and World Religions Honors program to write an honors thesis.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLWR major and Jr only and 3.5 GPA</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 independent study</p>