Ohio University

Classics Undergraduate Courses

<h2>CLAS 2110 - Greek and Latin Roots in Biomedical Terminology</h2><p>Develops the linguistic skills that improves one's ability to acquire, retain, and comprehend the biomedical terms that derive from Greek and Latin roots. Overview of ancient medicine helps to set the origins of many of these terms in their social and intellectual context. Provides an introduction to basic research tools in biomedical sciences. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 2300 - Heroes -- Classical Literature in Translation</h2><p>The best-known works of ancient Greco-Roman literature focus on the outstanding individuals whom we conventionally call "heroes". This course introduces significant works of Greco-Roman literature in English translation. It focuses on their impact on Western culture. Readings may be drawn from ancient epic, tragedy, biography, and historiography. No prior knowledge of classical culture or classical languages required.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 2310 - Human Aspirations Among the Greeks and Romans</h2><p>Identifies three of the great dreams or aspirations of the ancient Greeks and Romans--aspirations that lived on in written form and played an important role in shaping the ideals and aspirations of later Western civilization: 1) the political aspiration to create a just society; 2) the philosophical aspiration to "know oneself" and to be a person of virtue whatever the condition of one's society; and 3) the Christian aspiration to live a life of loving service that derives from the Christian understanding of the nature of God. Reading quite a bit of primary source literature in English translation expected. Primary means of presentation will be lecture with short periods of discussion interspersed. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 2340 - Classical Mythology</h2><p>Introduction to classical mythology; readings and discussions of myths and their interpretations. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 2510 - Ancient Jerusalem: From Solomon to Suleiman</h2><p>Attempts to approach the city of Jerusalem and the complex interaction of political, social, and above all religious realities that continue to define the city. Focuses on Jerusalem as a mythic as well as a historical entity; attempt to disentangle some of the threads that make Jerusalem the rich tapestry of meaning it has become. It does this by a careful reading of textual material from Jewish, Christian, and Islamic sources, as well as of archaeological and art-historical data. Focuses especially on the Temple Mount as a site of religious practice, transformation, myth, and conflict because of the long shadow it casts over the traditional landscape of Jerusalem.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2CP</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 2520 - Classical Athens</h2><p>Focuses on the people of the Greek city of Athens during an extraordinarily creative period of history--the century and a half from 480 B.C to 323 B.C--when the Athenians undertook the world's first democratic experiment. Examines textual sources (literature, philosophy, history, speeches and public documents) and archaeological sources (architecture, sculpture, painting) for the light which they shed on the ancient Athenians' political, intellectual, and artistic problems, concerns, and achievements. Explores how the Athenians dealt with those fundamental questions about life that face all thinking humans in a democracy. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 2530 - Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World</h2><p>Focuses first on Alexander himself, a man who became a myth even before his death. Next examines the Hellenistic world, the world that Alexander created out of his conquests. Alexander's conquests helped spread Greek civilization over the whole of the eastern Mediterranean. Many of the issues that people living in this world confronted are still relevant today: the nature of celebrity, for Alexander was arguably the first celebrity; the challenges of emigration, of living in a society that was culturally and ethnically diverse, of assimilating a foreign culture, and living under an autocracy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 2540 - Rome Under the Caesars</h2><p>Looks at life and thought in ancient Rome from Augustus through Marcus Aurelius (27 B.C.- A.D.180) based on archaeological, historical, and literary sources. Examines across cultural boundaries the issue of what it means to be human. Focuses primarily on the inhabitants of Rome, how they lived and what they thought about fundamental issues such as: How should the demands of the common good be balanced with individual needs and desires? What is the role of religion in society? of education? of art? How does one deal with death? What ultimately make life worth living for an individual in Roman society? Issues then compared with our own attitudes in modern America. Studies the use of political propaganda in society, the rituals of daily life in ancient Rome, and the art and architecture that made up the environment in which these people lived.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 2550 - Pagan to Christian in Late Antiquity</h2><p>Interdisciplinary approach to the dramatic changes that occur in ways of looking at the individual and one's place in the world during the 4th through 6th centuries of our era as paganism is replaced by Christianity as the dominant religious view. Geographical foci are Rome and Constantinople. Sources are textual, artistic, and archaeological. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 2900 - Special Topics in Classics in English</h2><p>Specific course content will vary with offering.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 15</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 2970T - Classics HTC Tutorial</h2><p>Individualized tutorial for HTC students only.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>CLAS 2971T - Classics HTC Tutorial</h2><p>Individualized tutorial for HTC students only.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLAS 2980T and HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>CLAS 2980T - Classics HTC Tutorial</h2><p>Individualized tutorial for HTC students only.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>CLAS 2981T - Classics HTC Tutorial</h2><p>Individualized tutorial for HTC students only.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLAS 2971T and HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>CLAS 3010 - Love in Antiquity</h2><p>Considers the ways people in the ancient western world experienced and talked about love. Draws upon important literary and philosophical treatments of love in classical texts. Humanist rather than sociological or anthropological: primary focus is not the behaviors and social structures of the Greeks and Romans, but their thinking and ideas.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 3110 - Gods and Heroes in Ancient Epic</h2><p>The tradition of ancient epic poetry is dominated by three great works: the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey and the Aeneid of Vergil; the course focus. A number of other Greek and Roman epics also figure in the course. The works are read from a variety of angles, including myth, religion, history, poetic art and cultural discourse. Such broader concerns as cruelty and forgiveness, violence and humor, choice and consequence, home, family, friendship and personal devotion constitute the humanistic themes of the course.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 3120 - Greek Tragedy and Comedy</h2><p>Survey of Greek tragedy and comedy in English translation: extensive reading from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes. Study of the historical and cultural setting and the literary aspect of the plays.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 3130 - Wisdom in Antiquity</h2><p>Introduction to the various forms of wisdom and knowledge treated in Greek and Roman literature. These forms of wisdom include practical skill, the liberal arts, scientific and philosophic truth, sophistic worldliness and professional training. Special attention paid to the relation of such knowledge and wisdom to Greek and Roman educational practices and ideals. Figures and texts of special interest include Protagoras, Socrates, Plato, Isocrates, Aristotle, the New Testament, Cicero, Seneca, and Quintilian. Also considered is the relevance of such historians as Herodotus, Thucydides, and Livy.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 3140 - Indian Epic: Mahabharata and Ramayana</h2><p>Students engage India¿s two great Sanskrit epics, the Mahabharata and the Ramayana. They analyze the epics on two levels: first, as historically situated and ideologically interested texts that reflect the social and political upheavals that occurred in South Asia between 500 BCE and 500 CE, and, second, as part of a living oral and scriptural tradition whose influence extends to contemporary Indian religion, ethics, and national consciousness.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 3430 - Women in the Ancient Mediterranean</h2><p>Explores the main sources of information about women in the related Mediterranean cultures of Greece, Rome the Near East and Egypt from 2000 B.C.E. to the 4th century C.E. These cultures are all patriarchal societies with an agricultural base for the economy, where women were seen as inferior to men, and their roles were tied to reproduction and care of the household. Textual evidence consideration includes economic and legal texts, epic, love poetry, drama, religious texts and funerary inscriptions, while the archaeological evidence includes sculpture and paintings. Focuses upon the culturally defined gender biases in the sources, and on feminist methodologies devised to clarify and interpret these biases.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> WGS 1000 or Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 3540 - Greek and Roman Religions and Society</h2><p>Examines how ancient Greek and Roman religion developed over time and how it related to other aspects of ancient society. Interdisciplinary in its approach; students will learn about this topic through primary source readings and discussion.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 3720 - On-Site Survey of Greek History</h2><p>A survey of Greek history from Mycenaean to modern times, with particular attention to sites on the itinerary of the education abroad program in Greece.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Study abroad program in Greece</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 3800 - Colloquium in Classics and World Religions</h2><p>Colloquium with times arranged at convenience of participants. Features: 1) presentations by faculty members on the different disciplines included in the study of Classics and World Religions, 2) presentations by faculty on aspects of their own research, 3) presentations by seniors of their research, and 4) meetings with visiting scholars.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Classics or world religion major or minor</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 2.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 3970T - Classics Tutorial</h2><p>Individualized tutorial for HTC students only.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLAS 2981T and HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>CLAS 3980T - Classics Tutorial</h2><p>Individualized tutorial for HTC students only.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLAS 2970T and HTC</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>CLAS 4520 - Roman Social History</h2><p>Examination of Roman life from a number of perspectives emphasizing the Roman family, sexual attitudes, slavery, and the economy. Examines ancient evidence from a range of sources: textual, material, and epigraphical. Familiarizes students with important scholarship on Roman social history and the methods of analysis represented in the field.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLAS 2540 or 2550 or HIST 3292</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 4900 - Special Topics in Classics</h2><p>Special topics in Classical literature, civilization and archaeology.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAS 4930 - Independent Study in Classical Literature</h2><p>Directed individual reading and research.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 independent study</p>
<h2>CLAS 4931H - Departmental Honors Thesis</h2><p>For classical civilization and classical languages majors who have been accepted into the Classics and World Religions Honors program to write an Honors thesis.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> (Classical Civilization or Classical Languages major) and Jr only and 3.5 GPA</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 independent study</p>
<h2>CLAS 4970T - Classics Tutorial Senior Thesis</h2><p>Senior thesis for HTC students only.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLAS 3980T and HTC and Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>
<h2>CLAS 4980T - Classics Tutorial Senior Thesis</h2><p>Senior thesis for HTC students only.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLAS 4970T and HTC and Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 12</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 12.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 tutorial</p>