Ohio University

Classical Archaeology Undergraduate Courses

<h2>CLAR 1110 - The Wonders of the Ancient Mediterranean</h2><p>Provides a broad overview of the archaeology of the Mediterranean world from the time of the Old Kingdom in Egypt (3rd millennium BC) to the early Byzantine period (6th century AD). Organized around iconic structures from the main cultures and time periods covered. Each site will be used individually as a vehicle for studying broader aspects of the society that produced it. Explores why it is particularly significant and representative of that society. Questions include: Why were lists of "wonders" made in the first place? What was the political significance of creating a "wonder"? What effect did the original Seven Wonders have on the monuments that came later? What effect did the wonders have on the modern imagination and the archaeologists devoted to rediscovering them?</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Fr or Soph</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2CP</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 2110 - Greek Archaeology</h2><p>Introduces Greek society and culture through investigation of its artifacts and the contexts in which they are found. Explores the different approaches to investigating particular kinds of material evidence, and what aspects of Greek culture they reveal. Starting with the Minoans and Mycenaeans, examines the growth of civilization in Bronze Age Greece and its rebirth after the fall of the Mycenaean palaces, to the appearance of city-states, and the rise of Philip of Macedon in the 4th century. Examines how to identify and date different types of material evidence, and be able to show their relevance to the reconstruction of ancient Greek culture as a whole.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2SS</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 2120 - Roman Archaeology</h2><p>Explores the material remains from the Roman world and of the information they provide about Roman society. Among other things, examines sculpture, painting, coinage, and architecture to learn how Romans at various levels of society used objects, images and built structures to make statements about themselves. Examines how these messages differed from one part of the empire to another. Teaches how to look at and 'read' objects and images. Special emphasis placed on methodologies used to interpret them.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2SS</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 2130 - Near Eastern and Egyptian Archaeology</h2><p>Traces the development of states in Mesopotamia and Egypt, from the beginning of agriculture to the end of the Bronze Age in 1000 B.C. Explores how these civilizations of the Near East first developed cities, temples and palaces, writing, taxation, and large scale warfare, all which influenced the development of cultures ancestral to our own. Topics include the role of religion in the early states, the rise of the absolute ruler, trade networks, and the growth of the Mesopotamian and Egyptian empires. Focuses in particular on the roles of the ruler in religion, society and economy, and the sources for reconstructing economy and society at the lower levels of society. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2SS</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 3610 - Greek Cities and Sanctuaries</h2><p>In the eyes of the Greeks, the city and the sanctuary were the two institutions that best defined their culture. Introduces the central role that citizenship, civic institutions, religion and sanctuaries played in the city-states of Ancient Greece by tracing the architectural and social history of Greek cities and sanctuaries over a thousand year period. Focuses on a wide range of cities and sanctuaries, paying special attention to ancient Athens as an innovator in both civic institutions and temple development.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 3620 - The Archaeology of Roman Cities</h2><p>An archaeological study of Rome and other Roman cities from the 8th century B.C. to the fall of the Roman empire. Particular emphasis is placed on the physical remains as products of and evidence for the changing cultural and political concepts that constantly revised the design and composition of Roman cities. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 3630 - Aegean Bronze Age Archaeology</h2><p>The Aegean civilizations of Mycenaean Greece and Minoan Crete were discovered only since 1870, and were the first to be analyzed and interpreted solely from archaeological remains. Explores the material evidence to trace the development of these complex Bronze Age cultures in the Aegean, while studying the early excavators starting with Schliemann and Evans. Reviews different types of material remains, and the different, often conflicting strategies used to collect and interpret them. Focuses on the development of Aegean civilizations from the appearance of the first agricultural communities in the Neolithic period (6000 B.C.) to the widespread destruction and subsequent economic decline at the end of the Bronze Age (1100 B.C.). </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> Soph or Jr or Sr</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 3640 - Craft and Technology in the Roman World</h2><p>Examines the relationship between the development of technology and political/economic factors that affected changing attitudes and desires of the Roman people in different parts of the Roman Empire. Explores the tools and processes used for making objects, building structures, and supplying water and food to urban masses as well as the organization of labor that makes such accomplishments possible. Various types of modern analysis are discussed to show how advances in technology affect our understanding of the ancient world. Counterpoints made with Classical Greek and Hellenistic cultures since many technologies were borrowed by the Romans. Modern parallels also discussed.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 3710 - Ancient Rome: Development of the City from the 8th Century B.C. to the 4th Century A.D.</h2><p>Introduces the urban development of ancient Rome through an intensive on-site examination of its monuments and artifacts. Focuses on field work. While Rome is the focus of the course, several days are also spent at Ostia and Pompeii to highlight aspects of Roman life not readily observable in modern Rome. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLAR 2120 or 3620 or CLAS 2540 or HIST 3292</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 6.0 seminar</p>
<h2>CLAR 4930 - Independent Study in Classical Archaeology</h2><p>Independent research in topics of classical archaeology.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> CLAR 2110 or 2120 or 2130</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 hours.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 independent study</p>
<h2>CLAR 2900 - Special Topics in Classical Archaeology</h2><p>Specific course content will vary with offering.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 15</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 4900 - Special Topics in Classical Archaeology</h2><p>Specific course content will vary with offering.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 1 - 15</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> </p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be repeated.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 1.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 3650 - Technology in Greek and Roman Society</h2><p>Examines technological developments in Graeco-Roman world within a chronological framework so that the advances in technology can be related directly to broader changes in the Mediterranean world from the 7th century BC to the 4th century AD. Examines a variety of different types of technology including coinage, building construction, water management, agricultural/food production, terracotta, glass, metallurgy, shipbuilding, and warfare. Students look at ways in which the societal needs framed technological developmental at different times and places, as well as ways that new technologies affected the societies in which they occurred. A major goal is to examine the role of technology in the Mediterranean basin as the organization of society moved from the Greek city-state to Hellenistic kingdoms to the Roman Empire.</p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> WARNING: Not CLAR 364</p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2SS</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>
<h2>CLAR 3660 - Archaeology and Art: Contexts and Controversies</h2><p>The course focuses on the archaeological context of selected objects usually described as examples of Greek art. It examines where they were found, what significance they had in the culture that produced them, how they were excavated, how they have been conserved and what ethical issues surround the modern conservation and acquisition of them. Each object has its own story yet also fits into a larger context. Above all, this is a course that emphasizes the importance of establishing clear methodologies and its purpose is to provide students with tools to explore the contexts of objects, ultimately on their own. What questions do they need to ask? To what types of sources can they reliably turn for information? How might they interpret the ethical arguments raised by the excavation and acquisition of some objects? The core material for the course will comprise twenty objects. Chronology will provide the organizational principle for the study of the objects. The focus of each class will be a single object; readings will discuss some aspects of its context and part of the in-class presentation will provide comparative material/objects. </p><p><strong>Requisites:</strong> </p><p><strong>Credits:</strong> 3</p><p><strong>General Education Code:</strong> 2HL</p><p><strong>Repeat/Retake Information:</strong> May be retaken two times excluding withdrawals, but only last course taken counts.</p><p><strong>Lecture/Lab Hours:</strong> 3.0 lecture</p>