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Joseph Johnson

Dr. Joseph Johnson

Assistant Professor

Biological Sciences
Irvine 310
jjohnson@ohio.edu
740-593-2275

Recent News

Education

Ph.D., University of Kentucky

Research Interests

Research in my lab focuses on the physiological ecology and conservation biology of mammals, with an emphasis on bats. Specific research questions asked in my lab are diverse, but always driven by the need to understand how individuals and populations respond to environmental challenges such as climate change, altered disturbance regimes, and human land-use patterns.

The field of physiological ecology provides researchers with the tools needed to make predictions regarding how animals are capable of responding to our changing biotic and abiotic landscape by studying their physiological and behavioral responses in situ. The field of conservation biology, meanwhile, seeks to apply knowledge from numerous disciplines toward the study and conservation of Earth’s biodiversity. Bats are ideal organisms for these research in these fields because they are diverse, widespread, and are capable of dispersing great distances, yet are taxa of high conservation concern due to changing climates, newly discovered wildlife diseases, and various human activities.

Our research focuses on bats and other small mammals within this context of physiological ecology and conservation biology, with the larger goal of better understanding these diverse animals and guiding conservation efforts. Current projects in the lab include studies of hibernation and migratory patterns of bats in Chile, of behavioral and population ecology of bats in Yellowstone National Park, impacts of roads on forest bats in southeast Ohio, and impacts of large-scale prescribed burning on endangered bats in northeast Alabama.

Recent Publications

Johnson JS, Treanor JJ, Lacki, MJ, Falxa G, Baker MB, Dodd LE, Schneider DR, Waag AG, Lee EH (in press). Migratory and winter activity of bats in Yellowstone National Park. Journal of Mammalogy.

Johnson JS, Scafini MR, Sewell BJ, Turner GG (in press). Cave-hibernating bat species in Pennsylvania use colder winter habitats following the arrival white-nose syndrome. Biology and Conservation of Bats in Pennsylvania.

Lilley TM, Johnson JS, Ruokolainen L, Rogers EJ, Wilson CA, Schell SM, Field KA, Reeder DM (2016). White Nose Syndrome survivors have pre-WNS hibernation patterns despite Pseudogymnoascus destructans infection. Frontiers in Zoology 13.

Johnson JS, Reeder DM, Lilley TM, Czirják GÁ, Voight CC, McMichael JW, Meierhofer MB, Seery CW, Lumadue SS, Altmann AJ, Toro MO, Field KA (2015). Antibodies to Pseudogymnoascus destructans are not sufficient for protection against white-nose syndrome. Ecology and Evolution 5: 2203–2214.

Field KA, Johnson JS, Lilley TM, Reeder SM, Rogers EJ, Behr MH, Reeder DM (2015). The white-nose syndrome transcriptome: activation of anti-fungal host responses in wing tissue of hibernating bats. PLoS Pathogens 11: e1005168.

Johnson JS, Reeder DM, McMichael JW III, Meierhofer MB, Stern DWF, Lumadue SS, Sigler LE, Winters HD, Vodzak ME, Kurta A, Kath JA, Field KA (2014). Host, pathogen, and environmental characteristics predict white-nose syndrome mortality in captive little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus). PLoS ONE. 9: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112502.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ (2014) Effects of reproductive condition, roost microclimate, and weather patterns on summer torpor use by a Vespertilionid bat. Ecology and Evolution 4:157–166.

Johnson JS, Kropczynski JN, Lacki MJ. (2013) Social network analysis and the study of sociality in bats. Acta Chiropterologica 15: 1–17.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ (2013) Habitat associations of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) and their Lepidopteran prey in bottomland hardwood forests. Canadian Journal of Zoology 91: 94–101.

Johnson JS, Kropczynski JN, Lacki MJ, Langlois GD* (2012) Social networks of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) and their day-roosts in Kentucky bottomland forests. Journal of Mammalogy 93:1545–1558.

Recent Presentations

Rountree K, Edelman A, Johnson J, Stober J. Influence of prescribed fire on northern myotis and Indiana myotis in the southern Appalachians. Georgia Wildlife Society Annual Meeting, September 15–16, 2016.

Lewis M, Rountree K, Edelman A, Stober J, Johnson J. 2016. Extra limit maternity colony of southeastern myotis in northeastern Alabama. Georgia Wildlife Society Annual Meeting, September 15–16, 2016.

Edelman A, Johnson J, Stober J. Endangered bats and prescribed fire in the southern Appalachians. 21st Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network, February 18–19, 2016.

Johnson J, Kropczynski J, Treanor J. Studying bat behaviors and populations using high-frequency radiofrequency identification technology. 45th North American Symposium on Bat Research, October 28–31, 2015.

Field K, Johnson J, Lilley T, Reeder S, Rodgers E, Behr E, Reeder DM. The transcriptome of white-nose syndrome reveals host responses to fungal infection. 45th North American Symposium on Bat Research, October 28–31, 2015.

Lilley T, Johnson J, Ruokolainen L, Rogers E, Wilson C, Schell S, Field KA, Reeder D. White-nose syndrome survivors have pre-WNS hibernation patterns despite Pseudogymnoascus destructans infection. 45th North American Symposium on Bat Research, October 28–31, 2015.

Slusher A, Johnson J, Lacki M, Treanor J. Altitude- and sex-specific variation in roosting behavior and thermoregulation of Myotis lucifugus in Yellowstone National Park. 45th North American Symposium on Bat Research, October 28–31, 2015.

Full Vitae

Professional Experience

2016–            Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University (as of summer 2016). 

2014–2016   Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, Bucknell University. Courses taught: Mammalogy, Physiological Ecology, Organismal Biology (lectures and labs), Society and the Environment, and Biology (non-majors). Externally funded research under the grant entitled: Physiological changes in remnant bat populations in WNS-affected regions.

2012–2014   Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Biology, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA. Mentors: Dr. DeeAnn Reeder and Dr. Ken Field. Funding grant: Understanding WNS Survivors: Exploring Resilience and Resistance to Variable Levels of Geomyces [Pseudogymnoascus] destructans Exposure in the Context of Mitigation and Conservation.

2009–2012   Research assistant, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY. Mentor: Dr. Michael Lacki. Dissertation title: Foraging and roosting ecology of Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) at the northern edge of the species range. Courses taught: Forest Wildlife Management (co-instructor).

2006–2009   Wildlife Biologist, Stantec Consulting, Topsham, ME. Primarily responsible for leading Indiana bat studies and acoustic surveys for commercial wind developments.

2004–2006   Research and teaching assistant, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY. Mentor: Dr. Michael Lacki. Thesis title: Foraging behavior of long-legged myotis (Myotis volans) in north-central Idaho.

Externally Awarded Grants

National Park Service. 2016-2019. Use of radio-frequency identification technology to monitor bats in Yellowstone National Park. Joseph Johnson (PI). $60,000.

Rufford Small Grants for Nature Conservation. 2016-2017. The next frontier for white-nose syndrome: Identifying high-risk species and high-impact management practices in South America. Gonzalo Ossa, Thomas Lilley, and Joseph Johnson (co-PIs). $7,188.00.

United States Fish and Wildlife Service. 2015-2016. Effect of prescribed fire on northern long-eared and Indiana bats foraging and roost use in montane longleaf forests. Andrew Edelman, Joseph Johnson and Jonathan Stober (co-PIs). $30,000.

Yellowstone Park Foundation. 2015–2016. Bat ecology and movements in Yellowstone National Park. Joseph Johnson and John Treanor (co-PIs). $50,000.

United States Park Service. 2015. Population Monitoring, seasonal activity, and landscape movements of little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) in Yellowstone National Park. Joseph Johnson and John Treanor (co-PIs). $60,000.

United States Fish and Wildlife Service. 2014–2016. Physiological changes in remnant bat populations in WNS-affected regions. DeeAnn Reeder and Ken Field (co-PIs). Joseph Johnson (senior personnel). $349,230. I contributed significantly to the conception, writing, and execution of this grant.

Yellowstone Park Foundation. 2014–2015. Bat Monitoring Program for Yellowstone National Park. Michael Lacki and Joseph Johnson (co-PIs). $35,250.

National Science Foundation. 2013–2015. Using Citizen Science to Study the Social Behaviors of a Charismatic Rare Bat Species at Mammoth Cave National Park. Shannon Trimboli (PI), Rickard Toomey, and Guangming Xing (co-PIs). Joseph Johnson (Co-collaborator). $244,131.00.

Yellowstone Park Foundation. 2012–2013. Evaluating the status and distribution of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) in Yellowstone National Park prior to the arrival of white-nose syndrome. John Treanor (PI) and Michael Lacki (co-PI). Joseph Johnson and Luke Dodd, Co-collaborators. $30,000.

Yellowstone Park Foundation. 2011–2012. Fall behavior and pre-white-nose syndrome monitoring in bats of Yellowstone National Park. John Treanor (PI), Joseph Johnson, Michael Lacki, and Luke Dodd, Co-collaborators. $15,000.

Kentucky Division of Fisheries and Wildlife Resources. 2009–2012. Roosting and foraging of Rafinesque’s big-eared bat near the northern edge of the species’ range. Michael Lacki (PI) and Joseph Johnson (Doctoral student). $153,915.00.

Pending Grants

Emil Aaltonen Foundation. 2016. Disease at the edge of the “Perfect Storm”: White-nose syndrome in Finnish bats. Thomas Lilley (PI) and Joseph Johnson (co-PI). $289,000.00.

Peer-Reviewed Publications (* Student Co-Authors)

Johnson JS, Treanor JJ, Lacki, MJ, Falxa G, Baker MB, Dodd LE, Schneider DR, Waag AG, Lee EH (in press). Migratory and winter activity of bats in Yellowstone National Park. Journal of Mammalogy.

Johnson JS, Scafini MR, Sewell BJ, Turner GG (in press). Cave-hibernating bat species in Pennsylvania use colder winter habitats following the arrival white-nose syndrome. Biology and Conservation on Bats in Pennsylvania.

Lilley TM, Johnson JS, Ruokolainen L, Rogers EJ*, Wilson CA*, Schell SM*, Field KA, Reeder DM (2016). White Nose Syndrome survivors have pre-WNS hibernation patterns despite Pseudogymnoascus destructans infection. Frontiers in Zoology 13.

Johnson JS, Reeder DM, Lilley TM, Czirják GÁ, Voight CC, McMichael JW, Meierhofer MB*, Seery CW*, Lumadue SS*, Altmann AJ*, Toro MO*, Field KA (2015). Antibodies to Pseudogymnoascus destructans are not sufficient for protection against white-nose syndrome. Ecology and Evolution 5: 2203–2214.

Field KA, Johnson JS, Lilley TM, Reeder SM*, Rogers EJ*, Behr MH, Reeder DM (2015). The white-nose syndrome transcriptome: activation of anti-fungal host responses in wing tissue of hibernating bats. PLoS Pathogens 11: e1005168.

Grieneisen LE*, Brownlee-Bouboulis SA*, Johnson JS, Reeder DM (2015). Sex and hibernaculum temperature predict survivorship in White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) affected little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus). Royal Society Open Science 2: 140470.

Dodd LE, Lacki MJ, Johnson JS, Rieske LK (2015). Prey size and dietary niche of Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii). Southeastern Naturalist 14: 685-696.

Johnson JS, Reeder DM, McMichael JW III, Meierhofer MB*, Stern DWF*, Lumadue SS*, Sigler LE*, Winters HD*, Vodzak ME*, Kurta A, Kath JA, Field KA (2014). Host, pathogen, and environmental characteristics predict white-nose syndrome mortality in captive little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus). PLoS ONE. 9: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112502.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ (2014) Effects of reproductive condition, roost microclimate, and weather patterns on summer torpor use by a Vespertilionid bat. Ecology and Evolution 4:157–166.

Johnson JS, Kropczynski JN, Lacki MJ. (2013) Social network analysis and the study of sociality in bats. Acta Chiropterologica 15: 1–17.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ (2013) Habitat associations of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) and their Lepidopteran prey in bottomland hardwood forests. Canadian Journal of Zoology 91: 94–101.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ (2013) Summer heterothermy in Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) roosting in tree cavities in bottomland hardwood forests. Journal of Comparative Physiology B 183: 709–721.

Lacki MJ, Johnson JS, Baker MD (2013) Temperatures beneath bark of snag roosts used by long-legged myotis (Myotis volans) in the Pacific Northwest, USA. Acta Chiropterologica 15: 143–151.

Johnson JS, Kropczynski JN, Lacki MJ, Langlois GD* (2012) Social networks of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) and their day-roosts in Kentucky bottomland forests. Journal of Mammalogy 93:1545–1558.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ, Thomas SC, Grider JF* (2012) Frequent arousals from winter torpor in Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii). PLoS ONE 7(11): e49754. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0049754

Johnson JS, Dodd LE, Kiser JD, Watrous KS, Peterson TS (2012) Food habits of Myotis leibii along a forest ridgetop in West Virginia. Northeastern Naturalist 19:665–672.

Dodd LE, Johnson JS (2012) Observation of potential spring mating behavior in the eastern pipistrelle (Perimyotis subflavus). Bat Research News 53:37–38.

Lacki MJ, Baker MD, Johnson JS (2012) Temporal dynamics of roost snags of long-legged myotis in the Pacific Northwest. Journal of Wildlife Management 76: 1310–1316.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ (2011) Foraging and roosting ecology of Rafinesque’s big-eared bat at the northern edge of the range. In: Loeb S, Lacki MJ, Miller DA (Eds), Proceedings of the Symposium on the Conservation and Management of Big-eared Bats in the Eastern United States. Pp. 129–138. USFS Gen. Tech. Rep.

Johnson JS, Watrous KS, Giumarro GJ, Peterson TS, Boyden SA, Lacki MJ (2011) Seasonal and geographic trends in acoustic detection of tree-roosting bats. Acta Chiropterologica 13:157–168.

Johnson JS, Kiser JD, Watrous KS, Peterson TS (2011) Day-roosts of Myotis leibii in the Appalachian ridge and valley of West Virginia. Northeastern Naturalist 18:95–106.

Gikas NS, Sparks DW, Whitaker JO Jr., Johnson JS (2011) New ectoparasite records for bats in West Virginia and previous records. Northeastern Naturalist 18: 527–533.

Lacki MJ, Baker MD, Johnson JS (2010) Geographic variation in roost-site selection of long-legged myotis in the Pacific Northwest. Journal of Wildlife Management 74:1218–1228.

Treanor JJ, Johnson JS, Wallen RL, Cilles S, Crowley PH, Cox JJ, Maehr DS, White PJ, Plumb GE (2010) Vaccination strategies for managing brucellosis in Yellowstone bison. Vaccine 28:F64–F72.

Cox DR, Lacki MJ, Baker MD, Johnson JS (2008) Sample size and the characterization of roosting habitat of forest-living bats. Bat Research News 49:1–10.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ, Baker MD (2007) Foraging ecology of long-legged myotis (Myotis volans) in north-central Idaho. Journal of Mammalogy 88:1261–1270.

Lacki MJ, Johnson JS, Dodd LE, Baker MD (2007) Prey consumption of Tinsectivorous bats in coniferous forests of north-central Idaho. Northwest Science 81:199–205.

Hendricks P, Johnson J, Lenard S, Currier C (2004) Use of a bridge for day roosting by the hoary bat, Lasiurus cinereus. Canadian Field Naturalist 119:132–133.

Peer-Reviewed Publications in Review (* Student Co-Authors)

Lilley TM, Prokkola J, Johnson JS, Rogers EJ*, Gronsky S*, Kurta A, Reeder DM, Field KA (in review). Host immune responses determine persistence in a post-white-nose syndrome landscape. Submitted to Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Moore MS, Field KA, Behr MJ, Turner GG, Furze ME*, Stern DWF*, Allegra PR*, Bouboulis SA*, Musante CD*, Vodzak ME*, Biron ME, Meierhofer MB*, Frick WF, Foster JT, Howell D, Kath JA, Kurta A, Nordquist G, Johnson JS, Lilley TM, Barrett BW, and Reeder DM (in review). Energy conserving thermoregulatory patterns and lower disease severity in a bat resistant to the impacts of white-nose syndrome. Submitted to Biology Letters.

Peer-Reviewed Publications in Preparation (* Student Co-Authors)

Johnson JS, Kropczynski JK, Lacki, MJ (in prep) The structure of social networks differ between forest ecosystems in Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii). Intended for submission to Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.

Professional Presentations and Posters (* Student Co-Authors)

Rountree K, Edelman A, Johnson J, Stober J. Influence of prescribed fire on northern myotis and Indiana myotis in the southern Appalachians (Best Graduate Poster Award). Georgia Wildlife Society Annual Meeting, September 15–16, 2016.

Lewis M, Rountree K, Edelman A, Stober J, Johnson J. 2016. Extra limit maternity colony of southeastern myotis in northeastern Alabama (Best Undergraduate Poster Award). Georgia Wildlife Society Annual Meeting, September 15–16, 2016.

Edelman A, Johnson J, Stober J. Endangered bats and prescribed fire in the southern Appalachians. 21st Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network, February 18–19, 2016.

Johnson J, Kropczynski J, Treanor J. Studying bat behaviors and populations using high-frequency radiofrequency identification technology. 45th North American Symposium on Bat Research, October 28–31, 2015.

Field K, Johnson J, Lilley T, Reeder S*, Rodgers E*, Behr E, Reeder DM. The transcriptome of white-nose syndrome reveals host responses to fungal infection. 45th North American Symposium on Bat Research, October 28–31, 2015.

Lilley T, Johnson J, Ruokolainen L, Rogers E*, Wilson C*, Schell S*, Field KA, Reeder D. White-nose syndrome survivors have pre-WNS hibernation patterns despite Pseudogymnoascus destructans infection. 45th North American Symposium on Bat Research, October 28–31, 2015.

Slusher A, Johnson J, Lacki M, Treanor J. Altitude- and sex-specific variation in roosting behavior and thermoregulation of Myotis lucifugus in Yellowstone National Park. 45th North American Symposium on Bat Research, October 28–31, 2015.

Johnson J, Reeder D, Lilley T, Czirják G, Voigt C, Field K. Antibodies against Pseudogymnoascus destructans are not sufficient for protection against white-nose syndrome. 44th North American Symposium on Bat Research, October 22–25, 2014.

Reeder D, Moore M, Johnson J (presenting author), Field K. Bat Species Differences, Immunity, and the Fight against the White Nose Syndrome Fungus. The Wildlife Society 21st Annual Conference, October 24 – 29, 2014.

Johnson J, Lilley T, Reeder D, Czirják G, Voigt C, Field K. Immune responses to Pseudogymnoascus destructans. 7th Annual White-nose Syndrome Workshop, September 8–12, 2014. Invited.

Johnson J. North America’s vanishing bats: Methods for understanding population responses in a changing landscape? Invited seminar at Arizona State University, February 24, 2015.

Johnson J. North America’s vanishing bats: Methods for understanding population responses in a changing landscape? Invited seminar at Colorado Mesa University, March 2, 2015.

Reeder D, Meierhofer M*, Lumadue S*, Moore M, Johnson J, Behr M, Field K. Species differences in susceptibility to WNS and the cost of infection. 7th Annual White-nose Syndrome Workshop, September 8–12, 2014. Invited.

Reeder D, Johnson J, Moore M, and Field K. The immunological response to the fungal pathogen (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) that causes the deadly white-nose syndrome in bats. Infectious Diseases of Bats Symposium. Colorado State University, CO. June 26–27, 2014.

Johnson J, Reeder D, Moore M, Seery C*, McMichael J, and Field K. Prevalence of antibodies to Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome, in bats across the eastern United States. Research Coordination Network in Ecoimmunology. May 8–10, 2014.

Johnson J, Field K, McMichael J, Meierhofer M*, Stern D*, Reeder D. The effect of temperature and infectious dose on white-nose syndrome in captive Myotis lucifugus. 6th Annual White-nose Syndrome Workshop, September 3–6, 2013. Invited.

Johnson J. Understanding the path to survival: Can bats adapt to life with a recently introduced fungal pathogen? Invited seminar at Indiana State University, December 2, 2013.

Moore M, Field K, Behr M, Turner G, Furze M, Stern D*, Allegra P*, Frick F, Foster J, Kilpatrick M, Brownlee S*, Musante C*, Vodzak M*, Biron M, Meierhofer M*, Johnson J, Reeder D. Immune responses against Geomyces destructans vary between species. 6th Annual White-nose Syndrome Workshop, September 3–6, 2013.

Johnson J, Field K, McMichael J, Meierhofer M*, Stern  D*, Reeder D. The effect of temperature and infectious dose on white-nose syndrome in captive Myotis lucifugus. 16th International Bat Research Conference and 43rd North American Symposium on Bat Research, August 12–15, 2013. Invited.

Field K, Johnson J, Moore M, McMichael J, Stern D, Reeder D. Immune responses in hibernating bats. 16th International Bat Research Conference and 43rd North American Symposium on Bat Research, August 12–15, 2013. Invited. 16th International Bat Research Conference and 43rd North American Symposium on Bat Research, August 12–15, 2013.

Meierhofer M*, Johnson J, Reeder D. Fitness consequences of white-nose syndrome. 16th International Bat Research Conference and 43rd North American Symposium on Bat Research, August 12–15, 2013.

Reeder DM, Moore MS, Johnson JS, Brownlee-Bouboulis SA*, Grieneisen LE*, Musante CD* Meierhofer MB*, Field KA*. Using our knowledge of how Geomyces destructans kills bats to understand species differences in the susceptibility to white-nose syndrome. 3rd International Berlin Bat Meeting, March 1–3, 2013.

Johnson J, Treanor J, Lacki M, Baker M, Dodd D, Falxa G. Preparing for possible arrival of white-nose syndrome in the western United States: An example from Yellowstone National Park. 42nd North American Symposium of Bat Research, October 25–28, 2012.

Johnson J, Thomas S, Lacki M. Winter torpor and movements of Corynorhinus rafinesquii and Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky. 17th Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network, February 23–25, 2012.

Johnson J. Summer and Winter Behaviors of Rafinesque’s Big-eared Bats: Sociality, Reproduction, and Hibernation. Invited seminar at Bucknell University, June 22, 2012.

Dodd L, Johnson J, Rieske-Kinney L, Thomas S, Toomey R, Lacki M. Pre- and post-hibernation changes in the body condition of bats susceptible to White-nose Syndrome at Mammoth Cave National Park. 22nd Colloquium on Conservation of Mammals in the Eastern United States, February 23–25, 2012.

Johnson J, Lacki M, Grider J*. Thermoregulatory strategies of Rafinesque’s big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) occupying trees, caves, rock shelters and buildings. 41st North American Symposium of Bat Research, October 26–29, 2011.

Dodd L, Cox D, Johnson J, Lacki M, Rieske-Kinney L. Regional assessment of prey consumed by bats in central Appalachia prior to the arrival of White-Nose Syndrome. 41st North American Symposium of Bat Research, October 26–29, 2011.

Johnson J, Kropczynski J, Lacki M. Social networks of Rafinesque’s big-eared bats (Corynorhinus rafinesquii) in Kentucky. 16th Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network, February 23–25, 2011.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ. Foraging and roosting of Rafinesque’s big-eared bat in western Kentucky. Kentucky Bat Working Group, November, 2010. Invited.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ, Langlois GD. Social roosting behavior in colonies of Corynorhinus rafinesquii in bottomland hardwood and upland karst regions of Kentucky. 40th North American Symposium of Bat Research, October 27–30, 2010.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ. Foraging and roosting ecology of Rafinesque’s big-eared bat at the northern edge of the range. Proceedings of the symposium on the conservation and management of big-eared bats in the eastern United States. March 9–10, 2010.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ. Foraging and roosting of Rafinesque’s big-eared bat in Mammoth Cave National Park. Kentucky Bat Working Group, November 13, 2009. Invited.

Watrous KS, Johnson JS, Giumarro GJ, Peterson TS, Boyden SA. Seasonal and geographic trends in acoustic detection of tree-roosting bats. 39th North American Symposium of Bat Research, November 4–7, 2009.

Johnson JS, Kiser JD, Watrous KW, Peterson TS. Day-roosts of Myotis leibii in the Appalachian ridge and valley of West Virginia. 38th North American Symposium on Bat Research. October 22–28, 2008.

Johnson JS, Roy RD, Boyden S, Peterson T. Foraging and roosting ecology of Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) in north-central New York. 37th Annual North American Symposium on Bat Research. August 19–23, 2007.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ, Baker MD. Foraging ecology of long-legged myotis (Myotis volans) in north-central Idaho. 36th North American Symposium on Bat Research. October 18–21, 2006.

Johnson JS, Lacki MJ, Baker MD. Foraging behavior of long-legged myotis (Myotis volans) in northern Idaho. 35th North American Symposium on Bat Research. October 19–22, 2005.

Baker MD, Lacki MJ, Johnson JS. Day-roosting behavior of female Myotis volans in xeric and mesic forests of intermountain northwestern United States. 35th North American Symposium on Bat Research. October 19–22, 2005.

Reviewer for the Following Academic Journals

Animal Behavior; Acta Chiropterologica; Behavioral Processes; Journal of Comparative Physiology, B; Journal of Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology; Journal of Mammalogy; Journal of Thermal Biology; Mammalian Biology; Mammalia; Northeastern Naturalist; Southeastern Naturalist; Western North American Naturalist

Outside Service

  • Associate Editor, Northeastern Naturalist, 2013–Current.
  • Organizing member, Eastern Small-footed Myotis Working Group, 2012–Current.
  • Teaching about Bats and their Ecology, two-day training donated to the Pennsylvania Bureau of State Parks, May 2015.
  • Updates on white-nose syndrome, and education/training on bat ecology and management. Time donated to the Pennsylvania Bureau of State Parks, May 2014.
  • Member, Bats on Public Lands Committee, Southeastern Bat Diversity Network, 2012–2014.

Awards and Fellowships

  • 2011               Southeastern Bat Diversity Network Best Student Oral Presentation, 21st Colloquium on Conservation of Mammals in the Eastern United States, February 23–25, 2011.
  • 2012               University of Kentucky Presidential Fellowship
  • 2012               Colloquium Outstanding Student Presentation, 22nd Colloquium on Conservation of Mammals in the Eastern United States, February 23–25, 2012.

Professional Associations

  • American Society of Mammalogists
  • The Wildlife Society
  • North American Society for Bat Research
  • Midwestern Bat Working Group
  • Southeastern Bat Diversity Network

Departmental Social Media

College of Arts & Sciences