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Biological Sciences Graduate Courses

BIOS 5010 - Human Anatomy

Provides basic and advanced training in body structure/function relations for students who have only limited undergraduate exposure to Human Anatomy. Beyond the basic course requirements, graduate students will be assigned an additional, in-depth survey or research paper on an advanced topic in functional human anatomy.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 lecture, 4.0 laboratory

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5030 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Comparative study of the anatomy of vertebrates. Structure, function, and evolution of the vertebrate body forms and organ systems are compared. Extensive lab work covers each of the major classes of vertebrates and includes dissection.

Credits: 5

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 lecture, 4.0 laboratory

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5070 - Developmental Biology

Mechanisms of animal development at tissue, cellular, and molecular levels of organization, with emphasis on experimental approaches. Integrates genetics, cell biology, and molecular biology.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5100 - Biological Pharmacology

An over-arching synthesis of concepts already learned in cell biology, genetics, physiology and chemistry are applied to the biological principles of drug action. Designed as a capstone experience for students in the sciences, especially the biological sciences. Covers the pathophysiology and therapeutic uses of drugs, for certain human diseases (e.g., heart failure, diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and infectious diseases). A select group of the most commonly prescribed drugs are discussed in terms of their cellular mechanisms of action and how drug actions alter disease states. After successfully completing the learning activities students are better prepared for biomedical careers after graduation. Toxicology and medicinal chemistry of various drug classes are not discussed.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5130 - Neuroscience

This course is an overview of the structure and function of the human nervous system. It provides students with a basic understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of neural communication, the development of the nervous system, the brain systems underlying human behavior (e.g., sensation and perception, movement, memory, sleep and arousal, and emotion) and the consequences of neurological damage to these systems.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5135 - Human Neuroscience Laboratory

Students will learn human brain anatomy and consequences of neurological damage by completing a human brain dissection, studying cross-sectional anatomy of normal and diseased brains (e.g., via magnetic resonance images), and analysis of clinical cases.

Credits: 1

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 laboratory

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5140 - Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience

Introduction to the molecular and cellular basis of the functioning of the nervous system. Topics include morphology, excitable properties of neurons, mathematical modeling, synaptic function, molecular biology, signal transduction, gene expression, and neuronal development.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5150 - Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience

Neural mechanisms of sensation (vision, hearing, touch, etc.), movement control (balance, locomotion, orienting, reaching, etc.), and cognitive processes (memory, emotion, decision making, etc.). In each class, students hear a lecture and discuss assigned articles from the research literature. A major goal is to train students in critical analysis of primary journal articles.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5160 - Biogeography

An examination of historical, environmental, and biotic influences that shape spatial patterns of plant and animal distributions and community structure in the contemporary landscape.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5180 - Methods in Computational Neuroscience

Lecture, discussion, and computer lab. Introduction to mathematical and computational techniques for modeling single neurons and networks of neurons. Cable theory; Rall's model; compartmental models; introduction to available software for simulating neurons and networks of neurons; modeling of action potentials, Hodgkin-Huxley equations, synaptic conductances, and voltage-dependent conductances; Hebbian synapses; synaptic modification rules; quantal analysis; neural networks. Students are expected to complete a simulation project using one of the available software packages.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 lecture, 2.0 laboratory

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5200X - Bioinformatics Introduction to Anthropological and Personal Genomics

This course introduces students to the principles and methods of anthropological and personal genomics. Emphasis on the fundamental evolutionary processes that determine populations' and individuals' genetic variation and their application to questions about ancestry, demography, evolutionary history, disease risk, drug response, and individuals' traits. Students will gain entry-level bioinformatic skills through hands-on experience analyzing human genomic data. Course is intended for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: lecture, laboratory

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5210 - General Microbiology

Overview of bacteria, protista, viruses, and their relationship to us and our environment. Lab training in common microbiological methods.

Credits: 4

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 lecture, 4.0 laboratory

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5220 - Pathogenic Bacteriology

A molecular approach is used to discuss bacterial pathogenesis and disease manifestations. Topics include aspects of immunity and pathogen control.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5230 - Pathogenic Bacteriology

A molecular approach is used to discuss bacterial pathogenesis and disease manifestations. Topics include some aspects of immunity and pathogen control.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 2.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,CR,PR,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I

BIOS 5240 - Virology

Intended to familiarize students with the principles of virology and focuses on human and animal viruses. Emphasis is placed on the molecular events following virus-cell interaction, which are critical to viral replication and pathology. Topics also include viral evolution, novel infectious agents, use of viruses for gene therapy, and modern methods of studying viruses.

Credits: 3

Repeat/Retake Information: May not be retaken.

Lecture/Lab Hours: 3.0 lecture

Grades: Eligible Grades: A-F,WP,WF,WN,FN,AU,I