Alumni College session schedule

Thursday, May 17
Artists, Authors, Creators: Artists’ Books and Zines at Alden
by Michele Jennings — 9 a.m.

Michele Jennings joined Ohio University in January 2018 as Alden Library’s art librarian. She has a Bachelor of Arts in the History of Art and Visual Culture from University of California Santa Cruz and earned a Master of Library and Information Studies from the University of British Columbia. Her interests include digital art history, digital collection ethics, artists’ books and zine collections, and visual resource description. Outside of the library, she is (predictably) an avid reader, crafter, museum goer, and dog lover.

Join Jennings for an introduction to the Libraries’ collection of artists’ books. These are artworks so diverse in form and content that they can only be defined as “books made by artists,” including self-published zines, handmade and bound books, and other book-like objects. We will showcase unique and rare materials from the collection and discuss the evolution of the genre, its importance in artmaking since the 20th century, and its use in classroom settings. Whether you’re interested in exploring the Libraries’ special collections, learning about bookbinding techniques, or dismantling mainstream publication centers, this session will have something for you! Once you’ve finished handling and interacting with these rare works of art, you can try your own hand at self-publishing and book arts with a zinemaking tutorial.
Mercury and Gemini: Why?
by Dennis Irwin — 9 a.m.

Dennis Irwin has been dean of the Russ College since July 2002. His research and teaching since 1987 has focused on the control of vibrations in various satellites and other aerospace applications. Since 1998, Irwin has been a member of the faculty of the International Space University and has participated as engineering department chair in its nine-week summer programs numerous times, all over the world, particularly the one he hosted in Athens in 2015. He is a fellow of NSPE, an associate fellow of AIAA, and a senior member of IEEE.

Most don’t question the rationale for the various Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo missions leading to the first human landing on the moon in July 1969. However, each mission and spacecraft were designed to test the safety and reliability of the operations that would be required to safely land and return a human from the surface of the moon. Participants in this session will learn about what was known — and unknown — about the difficulties of traveling and doing work in space, how those problems were solved, and which spacecraft and missions addressed each of these problems.
Al Qaeda, ISIS, and the Future of Jihad
by Nukhet Sandal — 10:30 a.m.

Nukhet Sandal is associate professor of political science and the director of global studies at the Center for International Studies. She earned her doctorate from the University of Southern California in 2010 and joined OHIO in 2013 after spending three years at Brown University as a postdoctoral fellow. Sandal is the author of Religious Leaders and Conflict Transformation (Cambridge University Press, 2017) and Religion and International Relations Theory (with Jonathan Fox; Routledge, 2013). Sandal is the recipient of the 2017 University Professor Award, 2017 Honors Tutorial College Best Tutor Award, and 2016 Jeanette G. Grasselli Brown Faculty Teaching Award.

This session will review the contemporary jihadi movements, their similarities and their differences. We will talk about the sources and inspirations for radical Islamic movements, their strategies for recruitment, their views on politics, and the issues they disagree about. We will then discuss counterterrorism frameworks and how to deal with the current and future jihadi terrorist organizations.
My Music Is Better Than Your Music
by Andre Gribou — 10:30 a.m.

Professor André Gribou holds degrees from the Hartt School of Music and The Juilliard School. He joined the School of Music’s Piano, Composition, and General Studies faculty in 2004 and has served as the School of Dance’s music director. Gribou has composed for and collaborated with many nationally and internationally known artists including Mark Haim, Chris Aiken, Peter Bingham, Mark Dendy, Douglas Neilson, David Parsons, and the Lark String Quartet. In 2012, he received an Emmy Award for Musical Score for the soundtrack to the documentary David Hostetler: The Last Dance.

Rock music and all its many subgenres is ubiquitous in almost every setting and area in contemporary life, and the music we listen to — and prefer — has become a way of contributing to self-identification and a badge of recognition. Do musical sub-cultures exist because our guts tell us certain kinds of music are for certain kinds of people? And what is “rock” music anyway?
Lunch
Maggie Davis Room, 1st floor of Baker University Center — Noon - 2 p.m.
Lifelong Success
by Andrew Pueschel — 2 p.m.

Andrew Pueschel is associate director of the emerging leaders program at the Robert D. Walter Center for Strategic Leadership and a lecturer in the Management Department of the College of Business. He teaches Management in the Integrated Business Cluster, Introduction to Business, and Leadership in Practice. Andrew holds a Bachelor of Arts in Business Ethics and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon, a master’s in Public Policy and Management from the Heinz School, and a doctorate in Leadership and Instructional Management from Robert Morris University. His research includes well-being, leadership, soft skill development, organizational behavior, culture change, and motivation.

Many students are choosing the hollow promise of a trophy at the expense of learning. At a time when students are expecting the grade of “A” for simply “checking the boxes” required of them, there is a need for an explanation for why this is not a mindset for best-practice in the professional arena. This session replicates an experiential learning module to prime students for achieving a grit through growth mindset that can easily be translated to our own personal and professional success.
More than Muscle and Bone: Harnessing the Brain in Concussion Medicine
by Dustin Grooms — 2 p.m.

Dustin Grooms is an assistant professor in the School of Applied Health Sciences and Wellness. He received his doctorate from The Ohio State University, with a focus on neuroscience and biomechanics. Prior to pursuing doctoral studies, Grooms was an athletic trainer with the College of Mount Saint Joseph and the Bengals in Cincinnati, Ohio, completed a master’s degree from the University of Virginia in kinesiology, and bachelor’s degree from Northern Kentucky University in athletic training. His main research interest is how the brain and movement mechanics change after injury and concussion to design new therapies.

This session will explore the latest in human neuroscience applied to sports-related injuries, specifically concussions and knee anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries with broad implications for any orthopedic condition (e.g. osteoarthritis, ankle sprains, shoulder instability). Typically, ligament or joint injuries have been thought of as only body structural issues that can be fixed with good surgery. However, we have shown that the brain also changes with these injuries and have developed new therapies to treat all manner of sport and orthopedic related injuries. We have been working also to improve the diagnosis, management, and even prevention of sports-related concussion injuries that have become a national concern.
My Music Is Better Than Your Music
by Andre Gribou — 2 p.m.

Professor André Gribou holds degrees from the Hartt School of Music and The Juilliard School. He joined the School of Music’s Piano, Composition, and General Studies faculty in 2004 and has served as the School of Dance’s music director. Gribou has composed for and collaborated with many nationally and internationally known artists including Mark Haim, Chris Aiken, Peter Bingham, Mark Dendy, Douglas Neilson, David Parsons, and the Lark String Quartet. In 2012, he received an Emmy Award for Musical Score for the soundtrack to the documentary David Hostetler: The Last Dance.

Rock music and all its many subgenres is ubiquitous in almost every setting and area in contemporary life, and the music we listen to — and prefer — has become a way of contributing to self-identification and a badge of recognition. Do musical sub-cultures exist because our guts tell us certain kinds of music are for certain kinds of people? And what is “rock” music anyway?
Lifelong Success
by Andrew Pueschel — 3:30 p.m.

Andrew Pueschel is associate director of the emerging leaders program at the Robert D. Walter Center for Strategic Leadership and a lecturer in the Management Department of the College of Business. He teaches Management in the Integrated Business Cluster, Introduction to Business, and Leadership in Practice. Andrew holds a Bachelor of Arts in Business Ethics and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon, a master’s in Public Policy and Management from the Heinz School, and a doctorate in Leadership and Instructional Management from Robert Morris University. His research includes well-being, leadership, soft skill development, organizational behavior, culture change, and motivation.

Many students are choosing the hollow promise of a trophy at the expense of learning. At a time when students are expecting the grade of “A” for simply “checking the boxes” required of them, there is a need for an explanation for why this is not a mindset for best-practice in the professional arena. This session replicates an experiential learning module to prime students for achieving a grit through growth mindset that can easily be translated to our own personal and professional success.
More than Muscle and Bone: Harnessing the Brain in Concussion Medicine
by Dustin Grooms — 3:30 p.m.

Dustin Grooms is an assistant professor in the School of Applied Health Sciences and Wellness. He received his doctorate from The Ohio State University, with a focus on neuroscience and biomechanics. Prior to pursuing doctoral studies, Grooms was an athletic trainer with the College of Mount Saint Joseph and the Bengals in Cincinnati, Ohio, completed a master’s degree from the University of Virginia in kinesiology, and bachelor’s degree from Northern Kentucky University in athletic training. His main research interest is how the brain and movement mechanics change after injury and concussion to design new therapies.

This session will explore the latest in human neuroscience applied to sports-related injuries, specifically concussions and knee anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries with broad implications for any orthopedic condition (e.g. osteoarthritis, ankle sprains, shoulder instability). Typically, ligament or joint injuries have been thought of as only body structural issues that can be fixed with good surgery. However, we have shown that the brain also changes with these injuries and have developed new therapies to treat all manner of sport and orthopedic related injuries. We have been working also to improve the diagnosis, management, and even prevention of sports-related concussion injuries that have become a national concern.

 

Friday, May 18
Artists, Authors, Creators: Artists’ Books and Zines at Alden
by Michele Jennings — 9 a.m.

Michele Jennings joined Ohio University in January 2018 as Alden Library’s art librarian. She has a Bachelor of Arts in the History of Art and Visual Culture from University of California Santa Cruz and earned a Master of Library and Information Studies from the University of British Columbia. Her interests include digital art history, digital collection ethics, artists’ books and zine collections, and visual resource description. Outside of the library, she is (predictably) an avid reader, crafter, museum goer, and dog lover.

Join Jennings for an introduction to the Libraries’ collection of artists’ books. These are artworks so diverse in form and content that they can only be defined as “books made by artists,” including self-published zines, handmade and bound books, and other book-like objects. We will showcase unique and rare materials from the collection and discuss the evolution of the genre, its importance in artmaking since the 20th century, and its use in classroom settings. Whether you’re interested in exploring the Libraries’ special collections, learning about bookbinding techniques, or dismantling mainstream publication centers, this session will have something for you! Once you’ve finished handling and interacting with these rare works of art, you can try your own hand at self-publishing and book arts with a zinemaking tutorial.
Trauma Informed Practices and the Opioid Crisis
by Tamarine Foreman — 9 a.m.

Tamarine Foreman is an assistant professor of counseling and higher education counseling in The Patton College of Education. She attended The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she earned a doctorate in counseling and counselor education. Her research is centered on understanding the impact of working with people who have experienced trauma by examining vicarious traumatization and posttraumatic growth with the goals of illuminating these processes, inspiring commitment to wellness, and supporting the developmental journey of counselors.

This session will explore the role counseling plays in addressing the region’s opioid crisis and how this public health emergency is shaping counselor education and helping professionals in school, justice, and children services systems. We will discuss how trauma pervades situations involving opioid abuse, which doesn’t discriminate anyone or any class, race, gender, or geographic location.
Al Qaeda, ISIS, and the Future of Jihad
by Nukhet Sandal — 10:30 a.m.

Nukhet Sandal is associate professor of political science and the director of global studies at the Center for International Studies. She earned her doctorate from the University of Southern California in 2010 and joined OHIO in 2013 after spending three years at Brown University as a postdoctoral fellow. Sandal is the author of Religious Leaders and Conflict Transformation (Cambridge University Press, 2017) and Religion and International Relations Theory (with Jonathan Fox; Routledge, 2013). Sandal is the recipient of the 2017 University Professor Award, 2017 Honors Tutorial College Best Tutor Award, and 2016 Jeanette G. Grasselli Brown Faculty Teaching Award.

This session will review the contemporary jihadi movements, their similarities and their differences. We will talk about the sources and inspirations for radical Islamic movements, their strategies for recruitment, their views on politics, and the issues they disagree about. We will then discuss counterterrorism frameworks and how to deal with the current and future jihadi terrorist organizations.
Trauma Informed Practices and the Opioid Crisis
by Tamarine Foreman — 10:30 a.m.

Tamarine Foreman is an assistant professor of counseling and higher education counseling in The Patton College of Education. She attended The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she earned a doctorate in counseling and counselor education. Her research is centered on understanding the impact of working with people who have experienced trauma by examining vicarious traumatization and posttraumatic growth with the goals of illuminating these processes, inspiring commitment to wellness, and supporting the developmental journey of counselors.

This session will explore the role counseling plays in addressing the region’s opioid crisis and how this public health emergency is shaping counselor education and helping professionals in school, justice, and children services systems. We will discuss how trauma pervades situations involving opioid abuse, which doesn’t discriminate anyone or any class, race, gender, or geographic location.
Lunch
Maggie Davis Room, 1st floor of Baker University Center — Noon - 2 p.m.
Talking through Tech: Interpersonal Communication Then and Now
by Stephanie Tikkanen — 2 p.m.

Stephanie Tikkanen earned her doctorate from the University of California Santa Barbara and is an assistant professor in the School of Communication Studies. Her research focuses on the intersection of interpersonal communication and social media. Specifically, she takes a theoretical and quantitative approach to understanding the ways in which channel and structural features interact with individual and relational motivations to affect interpersonal processes across relational types, including families, romantic partners, and friends. Her work has been published in outlets such as the Journal of Communication and Health Communication, and she has won various awards for her teaching at the university and regional levels.

The advent of new technologies has dramatically changed the way that individuals communicate—or has it? Popular culture suggests a great divide between “old” and “new” ways of communicating, but researchers argue that there are more similarities than differences. In this informative and interactive session, we will explore some of the ways in which interpersonal communication has changed and ways in which technology has shaped it for better and for worse. We will examine processes like relationship formation and maintenance, self-disclosure, and social support, as well as discuss innovative uses of technology.
A Crucial Crossroad: Healthcare and Politics
by Dan Skinner — 2 p.m.

As an assistant professor of health policy, Dan Skinner delivers lectures on a range of subjects, from Medicaid reform to Medicare financing to the Affordable Care Act’s significance to primary care. He also oversees a rotation that takes fourth- year students out of the hospital and teaches them the background of medicine, like human resources, finance, and what it is like to serve outside of hospitals in resources like clinics in low-income areas. He earned a Ph.D. and an M.A. in political science from City University of New York, The Graduate Center.

What is a political scientist doing on the faculty of a medical college? This session will show how politics is at the heart of the healthcare policy process, from professional relationships to major changes in the healthcare system, and will discuss how physicians need to be involved in the decision-making process.
Talking through Tech: Interpersonal Communication Then and Now
by Stephanie Tikkanen — 3:30 p.m.

Stephanie Tikkanen earned her doctorate from the University of California Santa Barbara and is an assistant professor in the School of Communication Studies. Her research focuses on the intersection of interpersonal communication and social media. Specifically, she takes a theoretical and quantitative approach to understanding the ways in which channel and structural features interact with individual and relational motivations to affect interpersonal processes across relational types, including families, romantic partners, and friends. Her work has been published in outlets such as the Journal of Communication and Health Communication, and she has won various awards for her teaching at the university and regional levels.

The advent of new technologies has dramatically changed the way that individuals communicate—or has it? Popular culture suggests a great divide between “old” and “new” ways of communicating, but researchers argue that there are more similarities than differences. In this informative and interactive session, we will explore some of the ways in which interpersonal communication has changed and ways in which technology has shaped it for better and for worse. We will examine processes like relationship formation and maintenance, self-disclosure, and social support, as well as discuss innovative uses of technology.
A Crucial Crossroad: Healthcare and Politics
by Dan Skinner — 3:30 p.m.

As an assistant professor of health policy, Dan Skinner delivers lectures on a range of subjects, from Medicaid reform to Medicare financing to the Affordable Care Act’s significance to primary care. He also oversees a rotation that takes fourth- year students out of the hospital and teaches them the background of medicine, like human resources, finance, and what it is like to serve outside of hospitals in resources like clinics in low-income areas. He earned a Ph.D. and an M.A. in political science from City University of New York, The Graduate Center.

What is a political scientist doing on the faculty of a medical college? This session will show how politics is at the heart of the healthcare policy process, from professional relationships to major changes in the healthcare system, and will discuss how physicians need to be involved in the decision-making process.