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To the Ohio University Community,

As your President and fellow Bobcat, I stand with all Ohio University students, faculty, staff and alumni who are protesting and speaking out against acts of hatred, violence and injustice against the African American community. Systemic racism has plagued our country for far too long, and we must work together toward a society that equally respects people of all backgrounds and experiences.

Like you, I am angered and sickened by the killing of George Floyd. And, I am saddened and ashamed that these injustices are still occurring in our country in 2020.

I stand with the Black Lives Matter movement and all who are protesting for equal treatment under the law and for a more just society. This is an issue of human rights and we cannot stay silent. We must help to lead the way for change.

Our nation has been through numerous times of change in the past, and many of our alumni have helped to move our country forward through protests and other actions.

I am proud of how so many members of our Ohio University Community are once again taking a stand in their words and actions. I was extremely moved by the eloquent and important statements from several individuals and groups within our community, and I wanted to share a few with you here:

The Division of Diversity and Inclusion published Ohio University’s Commitment to Social Justice, which includes resources for our community and begins with these words:

“Like many of you, we are deeply saddened by the acts of brutality our country has witnessed in recent days. These images and stories are painful reminders of the persistence of racial tension in our country, and they reaffirm the urgent need to stand in solidarity with our community members of color, especially African American community members.”

You can read the rest of the statement here.

The Ohio University Student Senate published a powerful statement that includes these words:

“We stand as a Bobcat Family, united against the hatred and intolerance that faces members of our community every day. We challenge all of our Bobcats to stand up against this discrimination by educating themselves and their peers, donating if they can, and continuing to support diversity and inclusion at Ohio University and throughout the country.”

You can read the entire statement here.

The Ohio University Alumni Association released a strong statement from Executive Director Erin Essak Kopp, which includes this paragraph:

“We stand in solidarity with the Black community against racism, oppression, and injustice. We stand for human rights and equality. We will not stand silent as hate and inequality continue to plague our alumni, colleagues, friends, and neighbors. Our values and our humanity call us to action. To create change, it is important that we all speak up, show up, act, educate ourselves, listen, challenge ourselves, and grow as individuals and as a community.”

You can read the entire statement here.

OHIO Athletics Director Julie Cromer released the #BobcatsLeadChange initiative, which includes this statement:

“We grieve with the rest of the nation as we witness and try to process the senseless and continuing violence and racial injustice toward people of color. In our shared grief, frustration, anger, despair and sorrow, neither silence nor inaction are acceptable, and we must be intentional in finding our way forward.”

You can read the rest of the statement here.

Patton College of Education Dean Reneé A. Middleton released this earnest and meaningful letter, which included this text:

“I envision our College putting a stake in the ground and joining others at our University in leading this campus towards efforts aimed at infusing anti-racist work into all we do. That leadership will not be based on patriarchal, sexist, homophobic, racist practices that are commonly found in textbooks. We will engage in a new form of leadership in which strength is defined as communal, vulnerable, loving, and warm. I want us to push one another to be better, without the mental baggage that comes with the expectations that any individual has all the answers.

The only way to make sure this crisis doesn’t turn into another moment that is chronicled on social media but does not drive legitimate systemic change is to TAKE ACTION. I would like us—faculty, staff, students, and alumni—to engage in anti-racist teaching, service, and intersectional, decolonizing research in collaboration with other academic colleges, Centers, and community members in pursuit of social justice.”

You can read the entire letter here.

The Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine published an emotional and thoughtful statement from Chief Inclusion Officer Tanisha King-Taylor that includes these words:

“Approaching these topics often re-ignites tensions between groups and leaves those most impacted by the consequences of racism with little energy. We have said it before, but we as an institution must all lean into the discomfort of discussing issues of inequity – fighting against racism and white supremacy is not the responsibility of Black people or people of color alone. White allies must unburden their fellow humans from the labor of liberation.”

You can read the entire statement here.

The Office of Executive Vice President and Provost Elizabeth Sayrs urgently affirmed the University’s commitment to social justice with a statement that included these words:

“The University’s commitment to social justice is not just the responsibility of those whose job titles include the word ‘diversity.’ We affirm that Black Lives Matter, and we stand in solidarity with our students, colleagues, and community members of color, especially African American community members, with our fellow citizens, and with our international students and colleagues. We must go beyond words and address historical and current contexts of the ongoing struggle for racial equality and justice in our classrooms and our course content, in our research and in our disciplines, and on our campuses and in our broader communities.”

You can read the entire statement here.

Dean of University Libraries Neal Romanosky published the Ohio University Libraries’ Commitment to Social Justice, which includes these words:

“We acknowledge our responsibility, and that of all libraries, to further social justice by providing equitable access to information, facilitating the creation of new knowledge, and preserving our history so that we may continue to learn from it.

In that spirit, we commit to confronting and addressing the history of systemic bias and inequity in libraries and in librarianship, as demonstrated in our collections, spaces, services, and traditional recruitment practices. As the Libraries embarks on creating new strategic priorities, we also commit to imbuing diversity, equity, and inclusion throughout those priorities, recognizing that these are not aspects of our work: they are the heart of it.”

You can read the entire statement here.

Ohio University and The Ohio University Foundation established the George Floyd Memorial Scholarship Fund.

You can read more about the George Floyd Memorial Scholarship Fund here.

I shared my own statement on Twitter, and you can read that statement here.

In addition, as a member of the Inter-University Council of Ohio Presidents, I was part of the organization’s statement, which includes these words:

“The IUC Presidents were horrified and disgusted by the brutality demonstrated by individuals within the Minneapolis Police Department that resulted in the death of George Floyd. Our hearts ache for the family of Mr. Floyd. We recognize the legitimate anger by people of all races, but particularly Black Americans who have experienced systemic hatred, racism, and bigotry for too long.”

“We pledge to engage our communities in serious action and redouble our efforts to end abuse, discrimination, and racial inequality.”

You can read the entire statement here.

The Mid-American Conference Council of Presidents also issued a statement that I was proud to be a part of. That statement includes these words:

“The Mid-American Conference joins with others in higher education to urge the nation to seek ways to foster understanding as we address issues of injustice, racism, and discrimination.”

You can read the entire statement here.

I hope that you will read over each of these statements, as well as the many others coming out of our Ohio University Community every day. But more than that, though, I hope you will be inspired by these calls to action.

We must make change in our country and right here at Ohio University. We must fight against systemic racism, hatred, oppression and violence against members of the African American community, as well as other marginalized communities. We cannot stand by and allow these injustices to continue. We must stand up and do what is right.

I am very proud of our Ohio University Community for taking a stand, and I am committed to standing with you now and moving forward.

M. Duane Nellis
President, Ohio University

Stay Connected

Explore these opportunities to engage with the OHIO community virtually

The Ohio Women’s Center and Ohio University Alumni Association present a free, two-part workshop via Zoom: "Implicit Bias" June 16 and "Allyship Training" on June 18.

During this two-part series, we'll learn to recognize our own biases and how to be better allies in both our personal and professional spaces. These sessions will encourage participants to recognize bias and utilize their privilege to be an active ally and co-conspirator.

If you are unable to join us during this time, these workshops will be recorded. To access this information at a later date, please visit the Bobcat Network or the Women's Center website.

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© 2020 Ohio University Advancement. All rights reserved.
Ohio University

Copyright © 2020 | Office of the President |Cutler Hall, Athens, OH 45701

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Ohio University
View this email in your browser

To the Ohio University Community,

As your President and fellow Bobcat, I stand with all Ohio University students, faculty, staff and alumni who are protesting and speaking out against acts of hatred, violence and injustice against the African American community. Systemic racism has plagued our country for far too long, and we must work together toward a society that equally respects people of all backgrounds and experiences.

Like you, I am angered and sickened by the killing of George Floyd. And, I am saddened and ashamed that these injustices are still occurring in our country in 2020.

I stand with the Black Lives Matter movement and all who are protesting for equal treatment under the law and for a more just society. This is an issue of human rights and we cannot stay silent. We must help to lead the way for change.

Our nation has been through numerous times of change in the past, and many of our alumni have helped to move our country forward through protests and other actions.

I am proud of how so many members of our Ohio University Community are once again taking a stand in their words and actions. I was extremely moved by the eloquent and important statements from several individuals and groups within our community, and I wanted to share a few with you here:

The Division of Diversity and Inclusion published Ohio University’s Commitment to Social Justice, which includes resources for our community and begins with these words:

“Like many of you, we are deeply saddened by the acts of brutality our country has witnessed in recent days. These images and stories are painful reminders of the persistence of racial tension in our country, and they reaffirm the urgent need to stand in solidarity with our community members of color, especially African American community members.”

You can read the rest of the statement here.

The Ohio University Student Senate published a powerful statement that includes these words:

“We stand as a Bobcat Family, united against the hatred and intolerance that faces members of our community every day. We challenge all of our Bobcats to stand up against this discrimination by educating themselves and their peers, donating if they can, and continuing to support diversity and inclusion at Ohio University and throughout the country.”

You can read the entire statement here.

The Ohio University Alumni Association released a strong statement from Executive Director Erin Essak Kopp, which includes this paragraph:

“We stand in solidarity with the Black community against racism, oppression, and injustice. We stand for human rights and equality. We will not stand silent as hate and inequality continue to plague our alumni, colleagues, friends, and neighbors. Our values and our humanity call us to action. To create change, it is important that we all speak up, show up, act, educate ourselves, listen, challenge ourselves, and grow as individuals and as a community.”

You can read the entire statement here.

OHIO Athletics Director Julie Cromer released the #BobcatsLeadChange initiative, which includes this statement:

“We grieve with the rest of the nation as we witness and try to process the senseless and continuing violence and racial injustice toward people of color. In our shared grief, frustration, anger, despair and sorrow, neither silence nor inaction are acceptable, and we must be intentional in finding our way forward.”

You can read the rest of the statement here.

Patton College of Education Dean Reneé A. Middleton released this earnest and meaningful letter, which included this text:

“I envision our College putting a stake in the ground and joining others at our University in leading this campus towards efforts aimed at infusing anti-racist work into all we do. That leadership will not be based on patriarchal, sexist, homophobic, racist practices that are commonly found in textbooks. We will engage in a new form of leadership in which strength is defined as communal, vulnerable, loving, and warm. I want us to push one another to be better, without the mental baggage that comes with the expectations that any individual has all the answers.

The only way to make sure this crisis doesn’t turn into another moment that is chronicled on social media but does not drive legitimate systemic change is to TAKE ACTION. I would like us—faculty, staff, students, and alumni—to engage in anti-racist teaching, service, and intersectional, decolonizing research in collaboration with other academic colleges, Centers, and community members in pursuit of social justice.”

You can read the entire letter here.

The Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine published an emotional and thoughtful statement from Chief Inclusion Officer Tanisha King-Taylor that includes these words:

“Approaching these topics often re-ignites tensions between groups and leaves those most impacted by the consequences of racism with little energy. We have said it before, but we as an institution must all lean into the discomfort of discussing issues of inequity – fighting against racism and white supremacy is not the responsibility of Black people or people of color alone. White allies must unburden their fellow humans from the labor of liberation.”

You can read the entire statement here.

The Office of Executive Vice President and Provost Elizabeth Sayrs urgently affirmed the University’s commitment to social justice with a statement that included these words:

“The University’s commitment to social justice is not just the responsibility of those whose job titles include the word ‘diversity.’ We affirm that Black Lives Matter, and we stand in solidarity with our students, colleagues, and community members of color, especially African American community members, with our fellow citizens, and with our international students and colleagues. We must go beyond words and address historical and current contexts of the ongoing struggle for racial equality and justice in our classrooms and our course content, in our research and in our disciplines, and on our campuses and in our broader communities.”

You can read the entire statement here.

Dean of University Libraries Neal Romanosky published the Ohio University Libraries’ Commitment to Social Justice, which includes these words:

“We acknowledge our responsibility, and that of all libraries, to further social justice by providing equitable access to information, facilitating the creation of new knowledge, and preserving our history so that we may continue to learn from it.

In that spirit, we commit to confronting and addressing the history of systemic bias and inequity in libraries and in librarianship, as demonstrated in our collections, spaces, services, and traditional recruitment practices. As the Libraries embarks on creating new strategic priorities, we also commit to imbuing diversity, equity, and inclusion throughout those priorities, recognizing that these are not aspects of our work: they are the heart of it.”

You can read the entire statement here.

Ohio University and The Ohio University Foundation established the George Floyd Memorial Scholarship Fund.

You can read more about the George Floyd Memorial Scholarship Fund here.

I shared my own statement on Twitter, and you can read that statement here.

In addition, as a member of the Inter-University Council of Ohio Presidents, I was part of the organization’s statement, which includes these words:

“The IUC Presidents were horrified and disgusted by the brutality demonstrated by individuals within the Minneapolis Police Department that resulted in the death of George Floyd. Our hearts ache for the family of Mr. Floyd. We recognize the legitimate anger by people of all races, but particularly Black Americans who have experienced systemic hatred, racism, and bigotry for too long.”

“We pledge to engage our communities in serious action and redouble our efforts to end abuse, discrimination, and racial inequality.”

You can read the entire statement here.

The Mid-American Conference Council of Presidents also issued a statement that I was proud to be a part of. That statement includes these words:

“The Mid-American Conference joins with others in higher education to urge the nation to seek ways to foster understanding as we address issues of injustice, racism, and discrimination.”

You can read the entire statement here.

I hope that you will read over each of these statements, as well as the many others coming out of our Ohio University Community every day. But more than that, though, I hope you will be inspired by these calls to action.

We must make change in our country and right here at Ohio University. We must fight against systemic racism, hatred, oppression and violence against members of the African American community, as well as other marginalized communities. We cannot stand by and allow these injustices to continue. We must stand up and do what is right.

I am very proud of our Ohio University Community for taking a stand, and I am committed to standing with you now and moving forward.

M. Duane Nellis
President, Ohio University

Stay Connected

Explore these opportunities to engage with the OHIO community virtually

The Ohio Women’s Center and Ohio University Alumni Association present a free, two-part workshop via Zoom: "Implicit Bias" June 16 and "Allyship Training" on June 18.

During this two-part series, we'll learn to recognize our own biases and how to be better allies in both our personal and professional spaces. These sessions will encourage participants to recognize bias and utilize their privilege to be an active ally and co-conspirator.

If you are unable to join us during this time, these workshops will be recorded. To access this information at a later date, please visit the Bobcat Network or the Women's Center website.

Twitter
Facebook
Instagram
© 2020 Ohio University Advancement. All rights reserved.
Ohio University

Copyright © 2020 | Office of the President |Cutler Hall, Athens, OH 45701

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