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The PhyloCode
Article 8. Registration
8.1. In order for a name to be established under this code, the name and other required information must be submitted to the registration database for phylogenetically defined names (see Art. 22.2). A name may be submitted to the database prior to acceptance for publication, but it is given only a temporary registration number at that time. The registration number will become permanent after the author notifies the database that the paper or book in which the name will appear has been published, provides a full reference to the publication, and confirms that the definition in the database is identical to that in the publication.
Note 8.1.1. Specification of the data that are required for registration can be obtained via the Internet or directly from the database administrator. The registration procedure, a provisional list of required data, and the pertinent addresses are found in Appendix A.
Recommendation 8.1A. A name should not be submitted to the registration database more than one month before it is submitted for publication, to prevent names from being reserved indefinitely in anticipation of possible publication.
Recommendation 8.1B. Registration of a name whose spelling or definition is identical to one that already exists in the database should generally be avoided (but see Recs. 8B, 8C). However, such names are not treated by this code as homonyms or synonyms until published.
8.2. At the submitter's request, a name or definition that he or she proposed can be changed or removed from the registration database if it is not yet published.
Recommendation 8.2A. The submitter of an unpublished registered name or definition who decides to change it or not to publish it should notify the database administrator promptly.
8.3. If the registered definition of a name disagrees with the definition in the protologue or the name is defined more than one way in the protologue, the author should determine which is correct and notify the registration database administrator promptly.
Note 8.3.1. If the author notifies the database administrator that the registered definition is incorrect, the administrator will correct the database and insert a note that the change was made. If one or more definitions in the protologue are incorrect, the administrator will annotate the database to alert users that this is the case.
8.4. If the registered definition of a name disagrees with the definition in the protologue or the name is defined more than one way in the protologue, and the author is no longer alive or is otherwise unable to determine which definition is correct, the following guidelines are to be used: If it is clear that the differences between the definitions are due to typographical errors, the definition that lacks typographical errors is treated as correct. If it is not clear that the differences between the definitions are due to typographical errors, the definition immediately associated with the designation "new clade name," "converted clade name," etc. is treated as correct. If two or more definitions are equally closely associated with the designation "new clade name" or "converted clade name," the decision as to which is considered correct is to be based on an interpretation of the author's intent. Such decisions regarding the correct definition of a name, if made by anyone other than the author, must be published (Art. 4) before the registration database administrator is notified (see Rec. 8A). Once published, such decisions can be reversed only by the CPN.
Note 8.4.1. If the author of a published correction notifies the database administrator that the registered definition is incorrect, the administrator will correct the database and insert a note that the change was made. If one or more definitions in the protologue are incorrect, the administrator will annotate the database to alert users that this is the case.
8.5. If the registered definition of a name and the definition in the protologue agree but contain a typographical error, the author may publish a correction. If the author is no longer alive or is otherwise unable to correct the error, any person may publish a correction (see Rec. 8A).
Note 8.5.1. After the registration database administrator is notified, the definition will be corrected in the database and a note will be added stating that the change was made.
Note 8.5.2. A correction slip inserted in the original publication does not qualify as a published correction. Publication of corrections must satisfy the requirements of Art. 4.
8.6. Accidental errors in a definition that appear in print subsequent to establishment are not to be treated as new definitions (i.e., establishment of homonyms) but as incorrect statements of the established definition. The same is true of unjustified corrections (i.e., any correction that does not fall under Arts. 8.38.5).
Recommendation 8A. The person making corrections of the sort covered by Arts. 8.4 and 8.5 should notify the database administrator promptly after publishing it.
Recommendation 8B. If a name or definition has been registered, but there is no indication in the registration database whether it was ever published, the name or definition should not be published by another person who has not first attempted to determine whether it was ever published. If bibliographic databases fail to resolve the question, a serious effort should be made to contact the person who registered the name or definition. (Contact information submitted with the name and maintained in the database may facilitate this.)
Recommendation 8C. If a serious but unsuccessful attempt has been made to determine whether a registered name was ever published, and the name is new (not based on a preexisting name), it is better to choose a different name, rather than use the same name and risk creating a homonym. If, in the same situation, the registered name is based on a preexisting name, it is better to publish a definition of this name, even at the risk of creating a homonym, rather than choose another, less appropriate name. This is particularly true if the registered name is widely used.