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Jim Dine

Online Exhibitions

"Circle of Cottonwoods: Selected Teec Nos Pos Weavings from the Edwin L. and Ruth E. Kennedy Southwest Native American Collection"

Many regional styles came out of the trading post system, but the Teec Nos Pos style (from the Teec Nos Pos canyon region in the Four Corners area of the American Southwest) is one of the most recognizable in its visual complexity and unique motif characteristics. Characterized by symmetrical and elaborate central designs surrounded by complex borders, the Classic Period of this style (1925 – 1945) produced many large weavings that were popular as floor coverings for homes in the northeastern part of the United States.

"Art of the Zuni"

Drawn from the Kennedy Museum of Art's Edwin L. and Ruth E. Kennedy Southwest Native American Collection, "Art of the Zuni" represents the full range of twentieth century Zuni jewelry-making and stone-carving. A wide range of scholars, artists and Zuni cultural specialists collaborated on this project.

"from sheep to loom"

A detailed description of the Navajo weaving process.

"Lesley Dill : Online Gallery"

An online gallery featuring the work of artist Lesley Dill.

"James Karales: Truth in Looking"

An accompanying education gallery to the museum's past exhibition, James Karales: Photojournalist. This exhibit explored some of the powerful images created by James Karales and asked the viewer to think about the context in which an image is understood.

"Navajo Pictorial Weavings"

"Navajo Wearing Blankets"

"Weaving is Life"

Weaving is Life" features the work of multiple generations of Navajo weavers. Combining works drawn from the Kennedy Museum of Art's existing collection of Southwest Native American textiles with newly commissioned weavings, the exhibition includes the work of as many as four generations of weavers from four different families.

"The Bragro Experience"

An Exhibition that focus' on stools as important markers in the social and ceremonial life of large groups of African women.