Tag Archives: Online Journalism

Ethical Considerations in Online Journalism

April 8, 4:15 – 6:15pm
Scripps 107

Moderator: Bob Benz
This workshop addresses ethical concerns in online media other than blogging (or not exclusive to blogging).

Student papers to be presented and discussed in the workshop are:

It’s About What Your School Can Do for You, Susanne Goericke, University of Kansas
Abstract pending

Sketches of a Sociological Inquiry into Blogging Ethics, Christopher Anderson, Columbia University
Largely lost amidst the debate about whether bloggers need an ethics code and, if so, what it should be, is the more sociological question of why “ethics codes” and occupational norms emerge in the first place. It is in helping to articulate and analyze this question, Anderson argues, that scholars can productively contribute towards our understanding this rapidly growing world of online media.

Blogging Practice, Serena Carpenter, Michigan State University
Abstract pending

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Online Journalism Ethics

Bernard Debatin, Ohio University

debatinOnline journalism is a new and growing field with a variety of ethical challenges and conflicts. So far, little research has been done on the ethics of online journalism, and general ethical standards and protocols have not yet been established. The ethical challenges and dilemmas of online journalism are unique–or at least more pronounced, intensified, or amplified–than in other media because of the distinctive media logic of the hybrid medium Internet and its conditions of use. Practical strategies and ethical recommendations for online media professionals will be proposed.

Bernhard Debatin is an Associate Professor at the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism, Ohio University, where he also serves as the Director of Tutorial Studies in Journalism. He is co-editor or author of six books and several extended research reports in the areas of media ethics, communication research, online journalism, and philosophy. He has published over 50 articles in scholarly books and journals. Debatin teaches online journalism, media ethics, and other conceptually and theoretically oriented courses on mass communication in the School of Journalism.

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Typology of Online Journalism

Mark Deuze, Indiana University

The 21st century has been called the ‘Participation Age’ with regards to the various ways people across the globe use and make media. Scholars and industry observers alike signal a shift away from the mass media model (typified by terms as broadcast, top- down, show-and-tell, b2c, downstream, one-way) towards a culturally converged model (coined as bottom-up, collaborative, participatory, p2p and c2b, upstream, interactive, multiple-way). This presentation analyzes the implications of the participation age for (online and offline) journalism.

Mark Deuze (1969) is assistant professor at Indiana University’s Department of Telecommunications, and is consultant to the Journalism and New Media program at Leiden University, The Netherlands. Mark received his PhD in the Social Sciences at the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. His work focuses on the relationships between media production, technology and society, and has appeared in print in a number of Dutch and English books and journals (including Journalism Quarterly, Journalism Studies and New Media & Society). At the moment, he is working on a new book titled ‘Liquid Media Work’, on the changing nature of media work in the context of cultural and technological convergence. Mark maintains a weblog on journalism, new media, and culture at http://deuze.blogspot.com. E-mail: mdeuze@indiana.edu.

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