Tag Archives: Cheating

Cheating in cyberspace: how to do it (and why not to)

Jon Dorbolo, Oregon State University
May 6th, 2002, 7:30 to 9:00 pm
Irvine 194

dorbolo_wagAs information technology changes the character of education, new challenges to academic integrity arise. In some ways, cheating and plagiarism are easier than ever. In other ways, the uses of information are radically transformed such that traditional conceptions of academic dishonesty need to be rethought. The key objective of this address is to identify the impacts of information technology on cheating methods, cheating detection and prevention, and the ethics of academic integrity. As a result of this session the participant will gain resources that can be used immediately to reduce risks of academic dishonesty and to check their work for questionable practices. Students will gain resources that help protect their work against charges of academic dishonesty; faculty and administrators will gain resources valuable in attenuating academic dishonesty and upgrading institutional policy.

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Computer Assisted

Jon Dorbolo
Oregon State University
May 3rd, 2004, 3:00 to 5:00 pm
Stocker 192

Free, public seminar

dorbolo_wagInformation technology and the internet create new methods and opportunities for academic cheating. This seminar will investigate modes of computer assisted cheating, methods of detection, and methods of prevention.

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21st Century Plagiarism

Jon Dorbolo
Oregon State University
May 4th, 2004, 8:00 to 9:30 pm
New Lecture Facility 145

dorbolo_wagPlagiarism, presenting other people’s words and ideas as one’s own, plays a dual role in Western culture. For one, hardly anyone ever wants to admit to plagiarism and in some instances there are serious penalties for it. For the other, cases of plagiarism are frequent and the perpetrators often profit from it. With the rise of information technology our concepts of information, communication, and property are changing. Our ideas about plagiarism are changing as a result. This presentation will focus on the nature of plagiarism; instances of plagiarism in government, academia, science, and journalism; the ethics of plagiarism; and the challenges posed by cultural and technological change.

For more information, see: http://disrupter.org/dorbolo/21st_century_plagiarism.html

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