Tag Archives: Blogging

Workshop: Practical Considerations in Blogging

April 8, 9-11am
Scripps 107

This workshop addresses practical considerations associated with ethical blogging.

Moderator: Sandeep Junnarker

Branding Credibility: Blogging Ethics from the Consumers’ Perspective, Steve Siff, Ohio University
Abstract pending

Can Blogging be More than Punditry and Emotional Rhetoric? Ethical Blogging Through Authenticity, Karen Mishra, University of North Carolina
Authentic blog communication is a potential way to overcome a lack of trust by harnessing the reliable voice of company experts to build long-term relationships between a firm and its constituents.

The Implications of Blogs for Democracy in the Arab World, Ali Mohamed, McGill University
The blog phenomenon in the Arab world has not yet ripened to the point that its effects can be accurately judged. Until now, Arab blogs have not received much attention from communication researchers or professionals. However, from the evidence that seems to be accumulating, I argue that the positive impact of the Internet and weblogs in the Arab world may be predominantly seen in the way in which they mediate the flow of news and information. I believe that blogs will revolutionize the Arab world, as they continue to turn up the pressure on Arab governments to come to terms with the winds of change that have started to blow through the Arab World.

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Privacy and Accountability in Blogging

Fernanda Viegas, IBM

Fernanda Viegas addresses blogging and privacy. Her presentation is based on the results from a survey she conducted on bloggers’ subjective sense of privacy and perceptions of liability in 2004.

Fernanda B. Viégas has just finished her PhD at the MIT Media Lab and joined IBM Research. Her research focuses on the visualization of the traces people leave as they interact online. Some of her projects explore email archives, newsgroup conversations, and the editing history of wiki pages. She is the creator of the award-winning Chat Circles program, an abstract graphical interface for communicating online. Her interest in issues of online privacy stems from her work with large archives of online social data. She received PhD and MS degrees in Media Arts and Sciences from MIT, and a BFA in Graphic Design and Art History from the University of Kansas. More information is available at http://web.media.mit.edu/~fviegas/

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Rhetoric of Political Bloggers

Jan Boyles, West Virginia University

jan_boylesResearch has demonstrated mainstream media pundits are mired in partisan rancor and rhetoric, eschewing rational arguments for emotional opinions. Will bloggers follow suit?

Jan Boyles is an instructor and second-year master’s student at West Virginia University’s P.I. Reed School of Journalism. Her research emphases include blogging and hyperlocal media. She teaches an introductory journalism course for incoming freshmen. In addition to teaching, Boyles serves as an undergraduate academic adviser and coordinates New Student Orientation. Boyles earned her undergraduate in news-editorial from WVU. She was selected by WVU as a Rhodes Scholar candidate and as a member of the WVU Order of Augusta, the highest University-wide academic distinction bestowed annually to eight graduating seniors. She is also a former newspaper reporter for The Dominion Post (Morgantown, W.Va.), Charleston (W.Va.) Gazette and Charleston (W.Va.) Daily Mail. Boyles co-wrote “Cancer Stories: Lessons in Love, Loss and Hope,” a student-produced book about five cancer patients that was published in 2005 by the WVU Press.

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Blogging investigative reporting: The Videoblog

Sandeep Junnarkar, Indiana University

sandeepSandeep Junnarkar addresses harnessing the Web Blogging’s multimedia capabilities to tell the untold stories; and the technical, financial, journalistic and ethical challenges an independent journalist/blogger faces when trying to bypass the traditional media gate keepers.

SANDEEP JUNNARKAR is a Weil Visiting Professor of Journalism at Indiana University in Bloomington. He entered the online journalism world at its infancy in 1994 as part of a team gathered to present The New York Times on America Online, a service called @times. He later became a breaking news editor, writer and Web producer when the paper went live on the Internet as The New York Times on the Web. He received a Masters in Journalism from the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia in 1994. He completed his undergraduate degree from the University of California at Berkeley. He served as a reporter and New York Bureau chief of News.com from 1998 to 2003.

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Blogging and Critical Publicity

Damien Pfister, University of Pittsburgh

No abstract provided

No biography provided

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Can Blogging be More than Punditry and Emotional Rhetoric?

Ethical Blogging Through Authenticity

Karen Mishra, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Authentic blog communication is a potential way to overcome a lack of trust by harnessing the reliable voice of company experts to build long-term relationships between a firm and its constituents.

Full Text (PDF)

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The Implications of Blogs for Democracy in the Arab World

Ali Mohamed, McGill University

The blog phenomenon in the Arab world has not yet ripened to the point that its effects can be accurately judged. Until now, Arab blogs have not received much attention from communication researchers or professionals. However, from the evidence that seems to be accumulating, I argue that the positive impact of the Internet and weblogs in the Arab world may be predominantly seen in the way in which they mediate the flow of news and information. I believe that blogs will revolutionize the Arab world, as they continue to turn up the pressure on Arab governments to come to terms with the winds of change that have started to blow through the Arab World.

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Blogging from a War Zone

Robert Bateman

robert_bateman_sSoldiers have been recording their thoughts and fears in personal journals for hundreds of years. Weblogs add a new twist, however, because not everyone who reads them is necessarily a “good guy.” Finding the line, that balance between the impetus of the volunteer soldier from an open society and the need to prevent the enemy from learning about our tactics, techniques and procedures, has been a painful process for the armed forces these last three years. Misunderstandings, miscommunications, and in a few cases, non-judicial punishment, have characterized the reactions of an institution which is in turmoil in more ways than one.


Robert Bateman is a professional soldier, an historian and author. He is both Airborne and Ranger qualified, and has served as an Infantry officer around the world over the course of his career. He has also served as a “Military Fellow” at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and taught history at the United States Military Academy and George Mason University. Currently he is assigned to the Pentagon, where he works as a strategist.

As a freelance writer he has published more than 200 articles and reviews in both military professional as well as academic journals and commercial magazines and newspapers. His first book, */Digital War, A View from the Front Lines /*(1999) was an edited anthology about the future of war which has subsequently been published in paperback as well as Korean and Chinese. His second book, */No Gun Ri, a Military History of the Korean War Incident /*(2002), was an academic work of military history which investigated the history, and the reporting of, the events at No Gun Ri in 1950.

In January 2005 he left his home on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, and went to Baghdad. Over the course of the year he served in Iraq he wrote a column for the /*DC Examiner */newspaper and also updated the readers of the MSNBC.COM blog “Altercation,” (hosted by the liberal pundit Eric Alterman) every week with his observations about life in Baghdad and Iraq.

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