Category Archives: 2006

2006 Student Conference Schedule

Friday, April 7:

  • Keynote Address: “We the Media,” Dan Gillmor (11:00 am – 12:30 pm, Scripps Auditorium)
  • Panel: Ethics & Blogging (2:00 – 4:00 pm, Scripps Auditorium)
    • Interactivity and Prioritizing the Human: A Code of Blogging Ethics, Martin Kuhn, University of North Carolina
    • Privacy and Accountability in Blogging, Fernanda Viegas, MIT MediaLab
    • Rhetoric of Political Bloggers, Jan Boyles, University of West Virginia
    • Blogging Investigative Reporting: The Videoblog, Sandeep Junnarker, Columbia University
  • Workshop: Blogging Ethics (4:15 – 6:15 pm, Scripps 107)
    • A Model of Creditability Development in Political Blogs, Colin Lingle, University of Colorado
    • Blogging and Critical Publicity, Damien Pfister, University of Pittsburgh
    • Ethical Considerations in Blogging, Kim Smith & Bryan Murley, University of South Carolina
  • Guest Presentation: “Blogging from a War Zone,” Major Robert Bateman (8 – 9:30 pm, Bentley 140)

Saturday, April 8:

  • Workshop: Blogging Practice (9:00 – 11:00 am, Scripps 107)
    • Branding Credibility: Blogging Ethics from the Consumers’ Perspective, Steve Siff, Ohio University
    • Can Blogging be More than Punditry and Emotional Rhetoric?, Karen Mishra, University of North Carolina
    • The Implications of Blogs for Democracy in the Arab World, Ali Mohamed, McGill University
  • Keynote Address: “Media Ethics in a Digital Age,” Clifford Christians, University of Illinois at Urbana-Campaign (11:00 am – 12:30 pm, Scripps Auditorium)
  • Panel: Ethics & Online Media (2:00 – 4:00 pm, Scripps Auditorium)
    • Typology of Online Journalism, Mark Deuze, Indiana University
    • Reality Constraints of Online Journalism, Bob Benz, Scripps Company
    • Online Journalism Ethics, Bernhard Debatin, Ohio University
  • Workshop: Online Journalism Ethics (4:15 – 6:15 pm, Scripps 107)
    • It’s About What Your School Can Do for You, Susanne Goericke, University of Kansas
    • Sketches of a Sociological Inquiry into Blogging Ethics, Christopher Anderson, Columbia University
    • Blogging Practice, Serena Carpenter, Michigan State University

Conference Overview

In April 2006 the Ohio University Institute for Applied and Professional Ethics and the E. W. Scripps School of Journalism will host Blogging and Online Journalism: New Media, New Challenges, New Ethics (BOJ).

BOJ will provide an opportunity for a small group of select students to join forces with leading figures in journalism and media ethics for an intimate, in-depth exploration of one of the most interesting and dynamic areas in applied ethics.

Half conference and half workshop, BOJ is split into two sections. Each includes an introductory public lecture (see keynotes on left), a public discussion of topic by a panel of experts (see panels on left), and student workshops (see workshops on left). During the workshops, student participants will present original work for discussion by their peers and by the invited panelists.

Details on BOJ speakers and participants and on their topics are available in the STUDENT CONFERENCE menu to the left.


We the Media: The rise of grassroots, open-source journalism

Dan Gillmor, Center for Citizen Media
dan_gillmor

As technology collides with journalism, democratizing the tools of media creation and distribution, news is evolving from a lecture into a conversation.

Dan Gillmor is author of “We the Media: Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People” (O’Reilly Media, 2004), a book that explains the rise of citizens’ media and why it matters. He is currently working on several projects aimed at enabling grassroots journalism and expanding its reach. He also writes a regular column for the Financial Times.

From 1994-2004, Gillmor was a columnist at the San Jose Mercury News, Silicon Valley’s daily newspaper, and wrote a weblog for SiliconValley.com. He joined the Mercury News after six years with the Detroit Free Press. Before that, he was with the Kansas City Times and several newspapers in Vermont. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Vermont, Gillmor received a Herbert Davenport fellowship in 1982 for economics and business reporting at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. During the 1986-87 academic year he was a journalism fellow at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, where he studied history, political theory and economics. He has won or shared in several regional and national journalism awards. Before becoming a journalist he played music professionally for seven years.

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Blogging from a War Zone

Robert Bateman

robert_bateman_sSoldiers have been recording their thoughts and fears in personal journals for hundreds of years. Weblogs add a new twist, however, because not everyone who reads them is necessarily a “good guy.” Finding the line, that balance between the impetus of the volunteer soldier from an open society and the need to prevent the enemy from learning about our tactics, techniques and procedures, has been a painful process for the armed forces these last three years. Misunderstandings, miscommunications, and in a few cases, non-judicial punishment, have characterized the reactions of an institution which is in turmoil in more ways than one.


Robert Bateman is a professional soldier, an historian and author. He is both Airborne and Ranger qualified, and has served as an Infantry officer around the world over the course of his career. He has also served as a “Military Fellow” at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and taught history at the United States Military Academy and George Mason University. Currently he is assigned to the Pentagon, where he works as a strategist.

As a freelance writer he has published more than 200 articles and reviews in both military professional as well as academic journals and commercial magazines and newspapers. His first book, */Digital War, A View from the Front Lines /*(1999) was an edited anthology about the future of war which has subsequently been published in paperback as well as Korean and Chinese. His second book, */No Gun Ri, a Military History of the Korean War Incident /*(2002), was an academic work of military history which investigated the history, and the reporting of, the events at No Gun Ri in 1950.

In January 2005 he left his home on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, and went to Baghdad. Over the course of the year he served in Iraq he wrote a column for the /*DC Examiner */newspaper and also updated the readers of the MSNBC.COM blog “Altercation,” (hosted by the liberal pundit Eric Alterman) every week with his observations about life in Baghdad and Iraq.

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Media Ethics in a Digital Age

Clifford Christians, University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana

What ethical issues are central now as the new technologies dominate the media professions and global information systems take shape? There are new moral problems such as digital manipulation. Privacy, surveillance, gender discrimination, distributive justice and cultural diversity are more complicated than ever. But the centerpiece ought to be an ethics of truth. A sophisticated principle of truth should at the leading edge of the cyberspace revolution.

Play Video

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Stoic Warriors: The Blessings and Curses of Being Stoic in War

Nancy Sherman
Georgetown University
January 19th, 2006, 8:00 to 9:00 pm
Bentley 140
Public Lecture

warriorsDr. Sherman, the author of Stoic Warriors, explores the moral challenges military men and women face in their lives and their implicit turn to Stoicism for guidance. Having served as a Distinguished Chair in Ethics at the U.S. Naval Academy, she offers an inside look as an outsider. Sherman argues that the contemporary military offers a window into ancient Stoic philosophy, including both its attractions and dangers.

Nancy Sherman is University Professor of Philosophy at Georgetown University and Adjunct Professor of Law at the Georgetown Law School. In 1997-1999, she served as the inaugural holder of the Distinguished Chair in Ethics at the United States Naval Academy. She is the author of Stoic Warriors: The Ancient Philosophy Behind the Military Mind; Making A Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue; The Fabric of Character: Aristotle’s Theory of Virtue. She is also the editor of Critical Essays on the Classics: Aristotle’s Ethics.

Nancy Sherman has been an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Yale University and has held visiting positions at Johns Hopkins and the University of Maryland. She has written over 30 published articles in the general area of ethics, history of moral philosophy, ancient philosophy, military ethics, moral psychology, and the emotions. She has been the recipient of many awards, including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, the Mellon Foundation, and the Charlotte W. Newcombe Fellowship of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.

Prof. Sherman holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University in philosophy and an M.Litt. in philosophy from the University of Edinburgh. She has a B.A. magna cum laude from Bryn Mawr College.


The moral soul of a soldier

Nancy Sherman
Georgetown University
January 20th, 2006, 4:00 to 5:00 pm
Ellis 113
Philosophy colloquium

nancy_shermanNancy Sherman is University Professor of Philosophy at Georgetown University and Adjunct Professor of Law at the Georgetown Law School. In 1997-1999, she served as the inaugural holder of the Distinguished Chair in Ethics at the United States Naval Academy. She is the author of Stoic Warriors: The Ancient Philosophy Behind the Military Mind; Making A Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue; The Fabric of Character: Aristotle’s Theory of Virtue. She is also the editor of Critical Essays on the Classics: Aristotle’s Ethics.

Nancy Sherman has been an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Yale University and has held visiting positions at Johns Hopkins and the University of Maryland. She has written over 30 published articles in the general area of ethics, history of moral philosophy, ancient philosophy, military ethics, moral psychology, and the emotions. She has been the recipient of many awards, including fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, the Mellon Foundation, and the Charlotte W. Newcombe Fellowship of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.

Prof. Sherman holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University in philosophy and an M.Litt. in philosophy from the University of Edinburgh. She has a B.A. magna cum laude from Bryn Mawr College.


Whose Rules? Doing Business Ethically Abroad

March 29th, 2006, 8:00 to 9:30 pm
Bentley 140

google_poster3Firms working in multiple cultures must deal not just with conflicting laws and customs, but often with conflicting moral and ethical systems as well. Is a company ever justified in making ethical compromises in one area in order to do good in another? Are there times when it would be unethical not to compromise?

Discussing the ethical challenges of working in multiple cultures will be a panel of Ohio University professors and students with first-hand experience of the kinds of problems business and individuals face, and with suggestions for dealing with those challenges.

  • Robert Stewart, Scripps School of Journalism
  • Glenn Corlett, Dean, Ohio University School of Business
  • Mark Leff, Scripps School of Journalism
  • Yan Li, Scripps School of Journalism
  • Moderator: Dr. Elizabeth Collins, Dept. of Classics & World Religions
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Do climate experts have special moral responsibilities?

Wendy Parker, Science Studies Program, University of California at San Diego
March 31st, 2006, 4:00 to 5:30 pm
Ellis 024

Climate change is often portrayed as an issue that hinges on difficult scientific and technical questions. Its ethical dimensions, by contrast, rarely take center stage. In this talk, I will first review some of the complex ethical questions related to climate change that philosophers have recently begun to discuss. My primary focus, however, will be on a set of related questions that have received very little attention. These questions concern the moral responsibilities of climate experts. Are climate experts morally required, in virtue of their special knowledge, to take part in debates over climate policy? When, if ever, are climate experts obligated to communicate the results of their research to the public? Might it actually be wrong for climate experts to adhere to traditional norms of scientific communication, such as those requiring full disclosure of caveats and uncertainties, when speaking in public settings? In addition to addressing questions like these, I will consider what other people, including scientists themselves, have said about the moral responsibilities of climate experts.


wendy_parkerWendy Parker received her Ph.D. in History and Philosophy of Science from the University of Pittsburgh in 2003. She spent the following academic year as a Congressional Science Fellow in the U.S. Senate, focusing on the issues of air pollution and climate change. Since then, she has held postdoctoral fellowships at Boston University and (currently) at the University of California, San Diego. She will join the faculty of the Philosophy Department at Ohio University this Fall.

Wendy’s research has primarily been concerned with the epistemology and methodology of computer simulation modeling. Her projects have addressed how computer simulations compare to traditional laboratory experiments, when computer simulation results should be trusted, and how computer simulation models help scientists to arrive at explanations of real-world phenomena. She is also interested in how science is used (and sometimes abused) in public policy debates. She has published papers on topics in philosophy of science, history of science, and atmospheric science.

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Blogging and Online Journalism: New Media, New Challenges, New Ethics

Keynote presentations:

  • Dan Gillmor, author of We the Media
  • Clifford Christians, University of Illinois at Urbana-Campaign

2006 April 7th, 11:00 am to April 8th, 6:30 pm
Athens, Ohio

In April 2006 the Ohio University Institute for Applied and Professional Ethics and the E. W. Scripps School of Journalism will host Blogging and Online Journalism: New Media, New Challenges, New Ethics (BOJ).

BOJ will provide an opportunity for a small group of select students to join forces with leading figures in journalism and media ethics for an intimate, in-depth exploration of one of the most interesting and dynamic areas in applied ethics.

Half conference and half workshop, BOJ is split into two sections. Each includes an introductory public lecture (see keynotes on left), a public discussion of topic by a panel of experts (see panels on left), and student workshops (see workshops on left). During the workshops, student participants will present original work for discussion by their peers and by the invited panelists.

Details on BOJ speakers and participants and on their topics are available in the STUDENT CONFERENCE menu to the left.