Category Archives: 2005

HEIDi meeting

February 4th, 2005, 12:00 to 1:00 pm
Porter 106

HEIDi, the Human-Environment Interaction Dynamics initiative, is a cross-disciplinary forum for research on the function and development of the human mind. The group meets monthly.

February’s meeting features presentations by Jeffery Vancouver (Psychology) and Tad Zawidzki (Philosophy).


HEIDi Meeting

HEIDi, the Human-Environment Interaction Dynamics initiative, is a cross-disciplinary forum for research on the function and development of the human mind. The group meets monthly.

November 18th, 2005, 12:00 to 1:00 pm

Porter 106

Dr. Gonzales-Vallejo, Part II


HEIDi Meeting

HEIDi, the Human-Environment Interaction Dynamics initiative, is a cross-disciplinary forum for research on the function and development of the human mind. The group meets monthly.

November 4th, 2005, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm

Porter 103

This month’s HEIDi meeting has been moved so members may attend the following talk:

Gerd Gigerenzer, Max Plank Institute for Human Development, Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition: “The Risks of Communicating Risk.” November 4, 2005, Porter 103.


HEIDi Meeting

HEIDi, the Human-Environment Interaction Dynamics initiative, is a cross-disciplinary forum for research on the function and development of the human mind. The group meets monthly.

October 7th, 2005, 12:00 to 1:00 pm
Porter 106

Dr. Claudia Gonzalez will present “The Stochastic Difference Model: Theory and Some Applications,” reflecting her research program on human decision making. Here is what she says about the presentation:

  • What is the basic comparative process underlying preferential choices?
  • How to understand many seemingly non-rational patterns of choices with a simple psychological model?

The talk will focus on these two main questions. I will give a short review of phenomena in the literature of preferential choice that contradicts basic principles of rationality. I will then introduce a working model of how individuals use information when making trade-offs that can account for that phenomena. The algorithm is very simple but descriptively powerful when dealing with binary choices. Extensions of the model to more complex situations will be discussed.


Support: University of Montana Summer Ethics Courses

Practical Ethics Center

2005 May 1st, 12:00 to July 18th, 12:00 am

Missoula, Montana

The Institute offers support for up to three Ohio University students to attend summer classes at the University of Montana’s Practical Ethics Center. Students will receive travel funding and tuition grants. Students must be registered for the Spring semester of 2005 and be eligible to receive transfer credits from the University of Montana.

Interested students should contact the Institute at ethics@ohio.edu to begin the application process.

The Practical Ethics Center at The University of Montana is offering the following Ethics Courses in Summer 2005. Registration forms, course descriptions, preliminary syllabi, faculty information, and travel information can be downloaded directly from our website, www.umt.edu/ethics. If you need more information, contact the Practical Ethics Center: 406-243-6605, ethics@mso.umt.edu.

May 23 – 29, Wilderness “Management:” Tensions & Paradoxes Instructor: Deborah Slicer, Professor of Philosophy Cost is $475 for 3 undergraduate or graduate credits ($360 for no-credit option).

May 30 – June 5, The Good, the Bad, and the Indulgent: Film and the Construction of Virtue Instructor: Sean O’Brien, Adjunct Professor of Philosophy/Liberal Studies Cost is $475 for 3 undergraduate or graduate credits ($360 for no-credit option).

June 6 – 11, Life & Death, Love & War: Ethics of Contemporary Controversies Instructor: Mark Hanson, Interim Director, Practical Ethics Center Cost is $475 for 3 undergraduate or graduate credits ($360 for no-credit option).

June 20 – 25, Ethics, Fire and Wilderness: Ethical Issues in Ecological Reconstruction Instructor: Dan Spencer, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Liberal Studies/Environmental Studies Cost is $515 for 3 undergraduate or graduate credits ($400 for no-credit option)-includes $40 field-trip fee.

June 20 – 26, Theory and Skills of Ethics Teaching Instructor: Deni Elliott, Poynter-Jamison Professor of Journalism Ethics & Press Policy, University of South Florida-St. Petersburg Cost is $525 for 3 graduate credits ($410 for no-credit option)-includes $50 materials fee.

July 15 – 18, Management Decision Making and Business Ethics Instructor: Andrew Wicks, Associate Professor of Business Administration, Darden School of Business, University of Virginia, and Co-Director, Olsson Center for Business Ethics Cost is $455 for 2 graduate credits ($340 for no credit option).

Research Ethics Online (asynchronous–take anytime, anywhere) Instructor: Dr. Mark Hanson, Interim Director, Practical Ethics Center Cost is $240 for 1 graduate credit.


HEIDi meeting

HEIDi, the Human-Environment Interaction Dynamics initiative, is a cross-disciplinary forum for research on the function and development of the human mind. The group meets monthly.

June 3rd, 2005, 12:00 to 1:00 pm

Porter 106

“Developing Self-Organizing Learning Architectures for Computational Intelligence”, Janusz Starzyk


HEIDi meeting

HEIDi, the Human-Environment Interaction Dynamics initiative, is a cross-disciplinary forum for research on the function and development of the human mind. The group meets monthly.

Today’s meeting is an informal gathering of HEIDi members in focus groups.

May 20th, 2005, 12:00 to 1:00 pm

Porter 106


HEIDi meeting

HEIDi, the Human-Environment Interaction Dynamics initiative, is a cross-disciplinary forum for research on the function and development of the human mind. The group meets monthly.

May’s presenter is Jim Zhu, with “Dynamic Psychological Systems — An Engineering View”

May 6th, 2005, 12:00 to 1:00 pm
Porter 106

This talk will present the (commonly practiced) engineering approach to dynamic processes and control systems, and suggest possible applications to psychological processes and systems. First, engineering concepts and terminology about dynamic processes and control systems will be introduced. Dynamic processes are characterized by having memory. As a consequence, changes and causal effects in a dynamic process take time, so they are (mathematically) described by evolutionary equations (i.e. differential or difference equations). Psychological and cognitive processes are also characterized by having memory, thus are naturally dynamic processes. A model of Abraham and Shaw (1982-88) for the left-right-center cognitive process will be used as an example of applications of the engineering approach to psychological processes, and extension of this example will also be suggested.

It is hoped that this talk will help to bridge a language barrier between members of HEIDi, and to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations. [A Pledge: I will make an effort to not indulge in math equations and engineering jargons, and to make it accessible and interesting to a broad audience.]

Reference Books:

  • Ralph L. Levine and Hiram E. Fitzgerald (Ed.) Analysis of Dynamic Psychological Systems, Lenum Press, 1992
  • Hassan K. Khalil, Nonlinear Systems, 3rd ed. Prentice Hall, 2002.

HEIDi meeting: Mathematical Psychology: Interpretation of Parameters as Psychological Processes

April 1st, 2005, 12:00 to 1:00 pm
Porter 106

Dr. Robert Roe will talk about computational modeling of cognitive processes. He will discuss model fit and parameter estimation procedures. In addition, he will discuss the relevance of these modeling procedures in terms of understanding and ultimately (potentially) helping humans.

HEIDi, the Human-Environment Interaction Dynamics initiative, is a cross-disciplinary forum for research on the function and development of the human mind. The group meets monthly.


HEIDi meeting

March 4th, 2005, 12:00 to 1:00 pm
Porter 106

“What Determines the Self in Self-Regulation? Applied Psychology’s Struggle with Will,” Jeff Vancouver and Tad Zawidzki.

HEIDi, the Human-Environment Interaction Dynamics initiative, is a cross-disciplinary forum for research on the function and development of the human mind. The group meets monthly.