Category Archives: 2001

Public Reading: Thomas Lynch

November 2nd, 2001, 2:00 to 3:00 pm
Alden Library 319
Public Reading

Thomas Lynch is an award-winninng poet and essayist, undertaker and humorist and possibly the most celebrated funeral director in the US.

He is the author of three collections of poems (Skating with Heather Grace, Grimalkin & Other Poems, and Still Life in Milford), and two books of essays. The Undertaking, won an American Book Award and Bodies at Motion and Rest is a further exploration of what Lynch desrcibes as the “litarary and mortuary arts.”

This event cosponsored with Ohio University Libraries, LIVE at the Library, Appalachian Community Hospice, Friends of the Libraries of Ohio University, Ohio University College of Ostoepathic Medicine, and Athens County Library Services


Grief & Loss, reading & discussion for children

Thomas Lynch & Appalachian Community Hospice
November 3rd, 2001, 10:00 to 11:00 am
Athens Public Library

Reading & Discussion for Children

Thomas Lynch is an award-winninng poet and essayist, undertaker and humorist and possibly the most celebrated funeral director in the US.

He is the author of three collections of poems (Skating with Heather Grace, Grimalkin & Other Poems, and Still Life in Milford), and two books of essays. The Undertaking, won an American Book Award and Bodies at Motion and Rest is a further exploration of what Lynch desrcibes as the “litarary and mortuary arts.”

This event cosponsored with Ohio University Libraries, LIVE at the Library, Appalachian Community Hospice, Friends of the Libraries of Ohio University, Ohio University College of Ostoepathic Medicine, and Athens County Library Services


America at a Crossroads: Morality & American Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

crossroads_4Part Four: Pedagogy, Press, & Propaganda: The Role of Education
November 5th, 2001, 7:30 to 9:30 pm
Irvine 194

Panel Discussion

  • Mary Rogus, Communication
  • Berhard Debatin, Communication
  • Jack Arbuthnot, Psychology
  • Mark Holowchak, Philosophy

Summaries of presentations:

Mark Holowchak: On the face of it, issues of foreign policy seem to exclude those of morality in democratic communities. After all, while the former is a public affair, the latter is a private affair. But democratic nations, as concretions of individuals, have or lack moral character insofar as the citizens of these nations have or lack moral character. In such a manner, the actions of nations can and often are a vivid reflection of the moral character of the people that comprise them.

One way to encourage the development of the right type of moral character in democratic communities is through improved pedagogy at academic institutions. Classrooms need to focus on education as integration. First, education should lead to personal integration in that it should stimulate growth toward a more solid sense of self. Second, education should prepare students for fruitful integration in their community. Last, education should develop an integrative link between students and the global community itself. Teachers can help foster these links by practicing educative means that focus on, among other things:

  1. having students justify claims by evidence or reasons,
  2. fostering respect for diversity and contrary opinions,
  3. creating an open classroom where each student feels free to participate,
  4. striving to meet the idiosyncratic needs of each student,
  5. focussing on active educational methods, and
  6. using rational, respectful argument in an effort to resolve conflict at all three levels of integration.

Building Ethics Modules into Courses

Arthur Zucker et al.
2001 December 4th, 8:00 am to December 5th, 5:00 pm
Copeland Hall

[registration | deadline]

Notice (Sept. 18): Due to demand, enrollment has been raised from 20 to 25.

Building Ethics Modules is a two-day workshop designed to help Ohio University instructors include ethics components in their classes. The workshop will focus on the development and implementation of ethics modules tailored to the field and subject matter covered in individual courses.

Participants will work individually, with other faculty, and with members of the institute to develop ethics modules. Each participant will receive $300 stipend upon completion of the workshop.

About 90 Ohio University faculty members have participated in the institute’s Building Ethics Modules workshops since the first workshop, in 1990. Participants have come from a wide variety of disciplines, ranging from industrial engineering to dance. Some have incorporated ethics into existing classes, while others have created new courses focussing on ethics.

Enrollment in the 2001 workshop is limited to 20 (first come / first serve). Register by filling out the on-line registration form (recommended), or send a one-page proposal to the Institute for Applied and Professional Ethics, 202 Ellis Hall. Hard-copy proposals should name the course into which the ethics module will be added; describe some ideas you have at the moment about how you might do it; and outline of the problems you foresee and hope to overcome by adding the new material.

Applications must arrive by Friday, November 9, 2001. The Institute will notify applicants by November 12.