Category Archives: Workshops

Ethical Considerations in Online Journalism

April 8, 4:15 – 6:15pm
Scripps 107

Moderator: Bob Benz
This workshop addresses ethical concerns in online media other than blogging (or not exclusive to blogging).

Student papers to be presented and discussed in the workshop are:

It’s About What Your School Can Do for You, Susanne Goericke, University of Kansas
Abstract pending

Sketches of a Sociological Inquiry into Blogging Ethics, Christopher Anderson, Columbia University
Largely lost amidst the debate about whether bloggers need an ethics code and, if so, what it should be, is the more sociological question of why “ethics codes” and occupational norms emerge in the first place. It is in helping to articulate and analyze this question, Anderson argues, that scholars can productively contribute towards our understanding this rapidly growing world of online media.

Blogging Practice, Serena Carpenter, Michigan State University
Abstract pending

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Workshop: Practical Considerations in Blogging

April 8, 9-11am
Scripps 107

This workshop addresses practical considerations associated with ethical blogging.

Moderator: Sandeep Junnarker

Branding Credibility: Blogging Ethics from the Consumers’ Perspective, Steve Siff, Ohio University
Abstract pending

Can Blogging be More than Punditry and Emotional Rhetoric? Ethical Blogging Through Authenticity, Karen Mishra, University of North Carolina
Authentic blog communication is a potential way to overcome a lack of trust by harnessing the reliable voice of company experts to build long-term relationships between a firm and its constituents.

The Implications of Blogs for Democracy in the Arab World, Ali Mohamed, McGill University
The blog phenomenon in the Arab world has not yet ripened to the point that its effects can be accurately judged. Until now, Arab blogs have not received much attention from communication researchers or professionals. However, from the evidence that seems to be accumulating, I argue that the positive impact of the Internet and weblogs in the Arab world may be predominantly seen in the way in which they mediate the flow of news and information. I believe that blogs will revolutionize the Arab world, as they continue to turn up the pressure on Arab governments to come to terms with the winds of change that have started to blow through the Arab World.

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Workshop: Blogging Ethics

April 7, 4:15 – 6:15pm
Scripps 107

This workshop addresses ethical issues arising from the practice of blogging. The focus here is more theoretical than applied.

Moderator: Mark Deuze

Student papers to be presented and discussed in the workshop are:

A Model of Creditability Development in Political Blogs, Colin Lingle, University of Colorado
Abstract not available

Blogging and Critical Publicity, Damien Pfister, University of Pittsburgh
Abstract not available

Ethical Considerations in Blogging, Kim Smith & Bryan Murley, University of South Carolina
A census of 100 authors of the most visited current-events blogs provided a snapshot of bloggers’ opinions about their role in a democracy, journalism and ethics during the tumultuous 2004 presidential election. Among the findings: forty-nine bloggers (90.7 percent) said they played an important role in political change; 51 bloggers (92.6 percent) said it was important that they fact-checked the traditional news media.