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Eng + Tech in the news

 

Four passengers and one crew member were treated for injuries after severe turbulence forced an American Airlines flight to divert while en route to Dallas from Seoul, South Korea, CNN reported this week. The flight landed in Narita, Japan and those injured were taken to local hospitals, CNN said.

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Mr. Baer, who worked as an engineer at a military contractor, became obsessed with building a “game box” that would allow people to play games on a standard television set.

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Patterns derived from the veins on a leaf and spider-webs could be key for designing electrical networks for optoelectronic systems, according to researchers from Boston College and South China Normal University

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The performance chemicals business will focus on organic growth, cash generation

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Responding to growing demand for safety devices that protect aerial work platform operators from getting crushed by overhead objects, French producer Haulotte has introduced its Activ’Shield Bar, which is now available across much of its lineup of telescoping, articulating and vertical lifts.

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EE Times wants to ensure domestic bliss with a handy guide to science, tech, engineering, and math-related movies that the whole family can enjoy. Some of the season's neatest films are tailor made for the family geek(s) and those who love them.

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On Friday, the BBC reported on a NASA email exchange with a space station which involved astronauts on the International Space Station using their 3-D printer to make a wrench from instructions sent up in the e-mail. Quite a marker for things to come? An object, after all, was designed on Earth and then transmitted to space for manufacture, indicating such events may have an impact on the economics of supply and demand for space missions. Astronauts would be more self-reliant on future long-duration space missions if on-demand manufacturing were in place, as an alternative to launching the actual items from Earth. NASA in this recent episode was responding to a request by ISS commander Barry Wilmore for a ratcheting socket wrench. Previously, said the BBC, if astronauts requested a specific item they could have waited months for it to be flown up on one of the regular supply flights. The BBC posed the question, "If a 3D printer can churn out something as useful as a tool in space, what else is possible?" The sky is no longer the limit. "Spare parts, components, even equipment, according to the company behind the printer, Made In Space. And that's just the start."

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Quote:
Given that internal combustion (IC) engines used to power automobiles are intended to drive wheels, it might seem obvious that engines which produces rotary rather than reciprocating motion in the first place would be preferable. But the reality is that piston engines have long established an overwhelming predominance in the worldwide automotive industry.

According to Phil Gott, analyst with...

Round and Round We Go: Rotary Engines for Automotive Applications

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