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Recreation Studies Assessment

ASSESSING STUDENT SUCCESS

Each semester, the Recreation Studies faculty members determine student success by assessing accreditation based learning outcomes. There are three primary learning outcomes. The following represent three data points that illustrate the degree to which students succeeding in achieving these learning outcomes.

LEARNING OUTCOME 1 (Standard 7.01)

Students graduating from the program shall demonstrate the following entry-level knowledge: a) the nature and scope of the relevant park, recreation, tourism or related professions and their associated industries; b) techniques and processes used by professionals and workers in these industries; and c) the foundation of the profession in history, science and philosophy.

Results: Program faculty members have included multiple specific learning outcomes into various classes within the curriculum that are consistent with Learning Outcome 1. Many of these are assessed using a professional portfolio evaluation. The professional portfolio serves several purposes. First, it is intended to provide students with a means of documenting and archiving their academic work in a way that allows them to summarize and synthesize their overall academic experience in the program. Second, the portfolio is intended to provide students with a means of demonstrating professional competency as recreation and leisure services professionals. The portfolio provides a means for students to showcase themselves as competent young professionals as they embark on their careers upon graduation. The following outcome measure reflects the average grade earned by students submitting their professional portfolio for evaluation in REC 2150: Outdoor Recreation and Education. The average grade on this assignment in Spring Semester 2013 was 91.7%.

LEARNING OUTCOME 2 (Standard 7.02)

Students graduating from the program shall be able to demonstrate the ability to design, implement, and evaluate services that facilitate targeted human experiences and that embrace personal and cultural dimensions of diversity.

 

Results: Program faculty members have incorporated multiple specific learning outcomes into their courses that are consistent with Learning Outcome 2. Many of these specific learning outcomes are assessed via a Recreation Program Plan assignment that all students in the program must complete in REC 3100 Recreation Programming. Student program plans must consist of a variety of components, requiring students to develop a mission and vision statement, program goals and objectives, detailed program descriptions, marketing and promotion strategies, a program budget, and an evaluation plan. The assignment is a semester long project that culminates with students presenting their proposed programs to an expert panel (local recreational professionals) and submitting their comprehensive program plan for written evaluation. Recreation Studies students earned an average score of 80% on this assignment during spring semester 2013.

LEARNING OUTCOME 3 (Standard 7.03)

Students graduating from the program shall be able to demonstrate entry-level knowledge about operations and strategic management/administration in parks, recreation, tourism and/or related professions.

 

Results: The program faculty members have incorporated multiple specific learning outcomes into various courses within the curriculum that are consistent with Learning Outcome 3. Many of these are assessed via the internship evaluation. These evaluations are designed specifically to assess student progress in meeting goals and objectives of the internship experience. Goals and objectives fall into a variety of categories that include administrative, program planning, and supervisory areas. In addition, agency supervisors provide feedback on a certain student traits such as written communication and professionalism. This outcome measure shows that 88% of students were assigned a letter grade of ‘A’ in REC 4910: Internship in Recreation during the summer of 2013.      

 

 

 

 

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