Skip to: Main Content Search Navigation Secondary Navigation

Ohio University is open; Water service has been restored to buildings on and around University Terrace

 

Valerie Martin Conley

Chair, Counseling and Higher Education; Professor
Counseling & Higher Eduacation
McCracken Hall 105D
conleyv@ohio.edu
740.593.9426

Dr. Valerie Martin Conley holds the M.A. and B.A. in Sociology from the University of Virginia. She then received the Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from Virginia Tech. She is an associate professor of higher education and director of the Center for Higher Education at Ohio University. She specializes in quantitative applications for educational policy and research drawing upon her experience as a consultant to the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Dr. Conley teaches courses on institutional research, assessment, management of higher education and policy. A former institutional researcher, she is currently serving on the board of directors for the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) and chairs the association's Higher Education Data Policy Committee. In June 2007, she received the Ohio University Outstanding Graduate Faculty Award.

Selected Publications:


Conley, V. M. (2012). Eroding retirement and benefits: The wrong response to fiscal crises. The NEA 2012 Almanac of Higher Education. Washington, DC: National Education Association.


Ponjuan, L., Conley, V. M., & Trower, C. (2011). Career stage differences in pre-tenure track faculty perceptions of professional and personal relationships with colleagues. Journal of Higher Education, 82(3), 319346.


Archibald, J. G., & Conley, V. M. (2011). The role of faculty senate in budget planning: Perceptions of faculty senate leaders. Planning for Higher Education, 39(4), 5458.


Conley, V. M. (2011). Retirement and benefits for the generations. The NEA 2011 Almanac of Higher Education. Washington, DC: National Education Association.


Conley, V. M. (2010). Retirement and benefits: New realities in an economic downturn. The NEA 2010 Almanac of Higher Education. Washington, DC: National Education Association.

Conley, V. M. (2009). Retirement and benefits: Protecting ourselves. The NEA 2009 Almanac of Higher Education. Washington, DC: National Education Association.

Conley, V. M.  (2008). As baby boomers retire.  In Donald E. Heller and Madeline B. d'Ambrosio (Eds.). Generational Shockwaves and the Implications for Higher Education. Northhampton, MA: Edward Elgar.


Conley, V.M., & Yakoboski, P.J. (2008). Managing higher education in uncertain economic times. In Advancing Higher Education.  New York: TIAA-CREF Institute.


Conley, V. M. (2008).  Regenerating the faculty workforce:  A significant leadership challenge and a public policy concern.  Advancing Higher Education, February, New York: TIAA-CREF Institute.


Conley, V. M. (2008). Retirement and benefits: Shifting responsibilities. The NEA 2008 Almanac of Higher Education. Washington, DC: National Education Association.


Conley, V. M. (2007). Of incentive plans, health benefits, library privileges, and retirement. Academe93(3), 20-27.


Conley, V. M. (2007). Retirement and benefits: Expectations and realities.The NEA 2007 Almanac of Higher Education. Washington, DC: National Education Association.


Conley, V. M. & Leslie, D. W. (2002). Part-time instructional faculty and staff: Who they are, what they do, and what they think. Education Statistics Quarterly4(2), 97-103.


Freeman, M. L., Conley, V. M., & Brooks, G. P. (2006). Vertical transitions: Community college student transfer and baccalaureate degree attainment. Journal of Applied Research in the Community College13(2), 141-150.


Leslie, D. W., & Conley, V. M. (Eds.). (2006). New ways to phase into retirement: Options for faculty and institutions.  New Directions for Higher Education, 132.


Conley, V. M. (2005). Exploring faculty retirement issues in public 2–year institutions. Journal of Applied Research in the Community College13(1), 59-72.


Toutkoushian, R. K., & Conley, V. M. (2005). Progress for women in academe, yet inequities persist: Evidence from NSOPF:99. Research in Higher Education46(1), 1-28.


Conley, V. M. (2005). Career paths for women faculty: Evidence from NSOPF:99. In John W. Curtis (Ed.), The challenge of balancing faculty careers and family work.  New Directions for Higher Education130, 25-39.


Conley, V. M. (2001).  Separation: An integral aspect of the staffing process.  The College Student Affairs Journal21(1), 57-63.

Turrentine, C. G., & Conley, V. M. (2001). Two measures of diversity in the labor pool for entry-level student affairs positions. NASPA Journal39, 84-102.


Hyer, P., Conley, V. M., & McLaughlin, G. (1999). The campus climate for diversity: Faculty perceptions.  Blacksburg: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.


Conley, V. M. (1997). Characteristics and attitudes of instructional faculty and staff in the humanities. (NCES 97-973). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics.


Chronister, J., Baldwin, R., Conley, V. (1997). Retirement and other departure plans of instructional faculty and staff in higher education institutions. (NCES 98-254). Washington. DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics.


Salvucci, S., Walter, E., Conley, V., Fink, S., Saba, M., & Kaufman, S. (1997). NCES measurement error programs. (NCES 97-464). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.


Smith, T., Rogers, G., Alsalam, N., Perie, M., Mahoney, R., & Martin, V. (1994). Condition of education, 1994. (NCES 94-149). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics.


YouTube
Facebook
Twitter