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Friday, Nov 28, 2014

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Color Run Kapple

Mother and daughter team Brooke (left) and Jill (right) Kapple enjoyed Sunday's Color Run

Photographer: George Mauzy

Color Run

A green color bomb explodes over the crowd during the 2013 Color Run

Photographer: George Mauzy

The Color Run Bri Lupton

Ohio University senior Bri Lupton was one of many students who enjoyed getting colored up for charity

Photographer: George Mauzy

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Color Run helps local charity while providing fun for all

Event attracts 2,500 participants in first year


Colors were in abundance on the Athens Campus after the completion of The Color Run on Sunday, Nov. 10, at the Ohio University Intramurals Fields.

The Color Run, which held its first race in January 2012, is a for-profit company based out of Salt Lake City, Utah, that creates the fun by dousing participants with colored food-grade cornstarch at four color stations throughout the 5-kilometer course.

The fundraiser attracted more than 2,500 participants who agreed to serve as blank white canvasses to help raise $8,000 for the local chapter of Habitat for Humanity. The Color Run, which is promoted as the "Happiest 5k on the Planet," started and ended at the South Green intramural fields.

One mother and daughter team drove up from Parkersburg, W.Va., to participate in the colorful event.

"We work out together all the time and have run in several 5Ks in the past -- we used today's event as bonding time," said Jill Kapple, the mother of Ohio University sophomore Brooke Kapple. "I really liked looking at all the colorful people, especially the ones in the tutus. This is a great event for a college campus because it gets people out of the house and moving around. It's not competitive, just people having fun."

Brooke Kapple, an athletic training major at Ohio University, said she also enjoyed The Color Run.

"I liked all the colors and would recommend this event to anyone," she said. "It was a lot of fun and it was cool that they came to Athens. They usually hold these events in the bigger cities."

Dane Cannon, the regional director for The Color Run, admitted that most of the races have been held in large cities, but credited Cecil Walters, director of Ohio University's Office for Multicultural Student
and Recruitment
, for making a great case for Ohio University and the City of Athens.

"Cecil told us that the Ohio University students petitioned for the event and he expressed how important it was for the campus to host such a large, positive event this fall," Cannon said. "I'm pretty happy about how the event turned out. When I repeatedly hear people say 'That's so cool,' it lets me know they're having a great time."

In addition to thanking Walters for proposing the event, Cannon also thanked City of Athens and Ohio University officials for their help in making the event a success.

"All of the people involved in making this event happen were much nicer than they needed to be," Cannon said.

Walters said he was pleased with how The Color Run turned out after writing the initial proposal to host the event in August. He said he wanted to bring the event to Athens after he ran in The Color Run in Columbus, Ohio, in July. He added that the run was also a great volunteer opportunity for international students, who are actively trying to become more integrated with other undergraduate students at Ohio University. 

"The Color Run was a win-win situation for everyone and most importantly it provided leadership and service opportunities for our student volunteers," Walters said. "The whole purpose of hosting it was to raise awareness and funds for the local chapter of Habitat for Humanity and we did that."

When asked about the future of the event in Athens, Walters said he hopes this is just the beginning for an event that both the Ohio University and local communities can enjoy together.

"My hope is to make this an annual event that benefits a different local charity each year," Walters said. "This event also can help our students bridge the gap between them and the local community through their service and leadership."